U.S. CitiesCity-Data Forum Index
Covid-19 Information Page
Go Back   City-Data Forum > U.S. Forums > Minnesota > Minneapolis - St. Paul
 [Register]
Minneapolis - St. Paul Twin Cities
Please register to participate in our discussions with 2 million other members - it's free and quick! Some forums can only be seen by registered members. After you create your account, you'll be able to customize options and access all our 15,000 new posts/day with fewer ads.
View detailed profile (Advanced) or search
site with Google Custom Search

Search Forums  (Advanced)
Reply Start New Thread
 
Old 10-12-2018, 07:06 PM
 
Location: 912 feet above sea level
2,268 posts, read 1,076,319 times
Reputation: 12592

Advertisements

Quote:
Originally Posted by LeTraveler View Post
People say that and I just think how much opinion is based on experience. Humid? Haha.

I'm coming from Atlanta, before that I was in central SC, grew up near the Atlantic...there is no comparison. It is so amazingly dry here. I didn't know it could be so dry and cool in any place in America. It gets fairly hot and slightly humid sometimes, like today, but it doesn't last long.
You know, claiming "It's not humid in Minnesota because it's more humid in Atlanta and South Carolina!" is about is nonsensical as claiming that it's not humid in Atlanta and South Carolina because it's more humid in some other places (New Orleans, the Florida peninsula, etc. - yes, it is, look it up).

As an aside... you didn't know "it could be so dry and cool in any place in America"?

Really? You've never heard that the United States has deserts? Or, you did, and figured that deserts are less dry than lush and green Minnesota?

That's... bizarre. And very uninformed.
Rate this post positively Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message

 
Old 10-12-2018, 07:44 PM
 
225 posts, read 153,628 times
Reputation: 441
^i'm sorry, but what exactly is your issue?

There is a level of humidity which is considered ideal for human comfort. Minneapolis this summer when I arrived had many days in or close to that range. So, no, it's not very humid.

Are facts better for you because experience is "nonsensical" in a response to a comment based on experience?

The rest of your comment isn't worth discussing, honestly. Read it over and you might understand why.
Rate this post positively Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
 
Old 10-12-2018, 09:05 PM
 
Location: Twin Cities
5,817 posts, read 6,433,427 times
Reputation: 8720
Minneapolis/St Paul— not on the list of most humid cities. No surprise really.
https://www.currentresults.com/Weath...mid-cities.php
Rate this post positively Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
 
Old 10-13-2018, 02:48 PM
 
3,368 posts, read 4,350,135 times
Reputation: 4756
Quote:
Originally Posted by LeTraveler View Post
^i'm sorry, but what exactly is your issue?

There is a level of humidity which is considered ideal for human comfort. Minneapolis this summer when I arrived had many days in or close to that range. So, no, it's not very humid.

Are facts better for you because experience is "nonsensical" in a response to a comment based on experience?

The rest of your comment isn't worth discussing, honestly. Read it over and you might understand why.
No kidding. I spent many years living in the tropics (4 degrees north of the Equator, where Teak grows naturally) so Minnesota humidity is a bit 'meh'; nothing to get excited about. I actually grew to like a certain amount of humidity for the positive effect upon the skin and lungs. Dry air exacerbates certain coughing spells. I lived in a dry climate before moving to the tropics, and had a dry, raspy, deep-seated cough for five years that worried me. When I got to the tropics, the cough disappeared.
Rate this post positively Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
 
Old 10-30-2018, 02:06 PM
 
70 posts, read 43,737 times
Reputation: 186
Quote:
Originally Posted by Glenfield View Post
Minneapolis/St Paul— not on the list of most humid cities. No surprise really.
https://www.currentresults.com/Weath...mid-cities.php
That's a year round average, it's bone dry in Minnesota winters. Averages of summer humidity is more telling.
Rate this post positively Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
 
Old 10-30-2018, 02:23 PM
 
83 posts, read 57,232 times
Reputation: 80
I love Minnesota. If I could afford to move, I would! I love to visit the cities and explore.
Rate this post positively Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
 
Old 10-30-2018, 07:18 PM
 
Location: Twin Cities
5,817 posts, read 6,433,427 times
Reputation: 8720
Quote:
Originally Posted by FJhg View Post
That's a year round average, it's bone dry in Minnesota winters. Averages of summer humidity is more telling.
You are wrong. The most humid month is December while the least humid is May.
https://weather-and-climate.com/aver...tes-of-America
Rate this post positively Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
 
Old 10-31-2018, 09:49 AM
 
425 posts, read 229,004 times
Reputation: 1116
Quote:
Originally Posted by Glenfield View Post
You are wrong. The most humid month is December while the least humid is May.
https://weather-and-climate.com/aver...tes-of-America
It's all about the dew point and using humidity is not a good method to measure how the weather "feels". For example, a temperature of 25 degrees with a dew point of 23 would have 92% humidity. It would "feel" better than 82 degrees with a dew point of 75 with a humidity of close to 80%. The 25 degree weather would feel dry while the 82 degrees would feel more tropical. The higher the dew point the more volume of moisture exists. So, don't pay attention to the humidity level but watch the dew point. That is why San Fran/bay area has high humidity levels but it usually has low dew points making SanFran feel comfortable.

Minnesota rarely gets above 75 degree dew points. However, in recent years we have seen an uptick in the water in the air due to both climate change and the increase in corn production (corn is a thirsty crop that though evapotranspiration can put a staggering amount of water in the air-3,000 to 4000 gallons per acre and Iowa alone puts out 50 billions gallons a day in the atmosphere during the summer). Minnesota production varies depending on the markets between corn and soy. Yes, Minnesota has an increased amount of water in the air than in the past. But, we are not like parts of the south with some truly killer dew points.

Last edited by TheGrandViking; 10-31-2018 at 10:03 AM..
Rate this post positively Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
 
Old 10-31-2018, 10:35 AM
 
Location: Twin Cities
5,817 posts, read 6,433,427 times
Reputation: 8720
Quote:
Originally Posted by TheGrandViking View Post
It's all about the dew point and using humidity is not a good method to measure how the weather "feels". For example, a temperature of 25 degrees with a dew point of 23 would have 92% humidity. It would "feel" better than 82 degrees with a dew point of 75 with a humidity of close to 80%. The 25 degree weather would feel dry while the 82 degrees would feel more tropical. The higher the dew point the more volume of moisture exists. So, don't pay attention to the humidity level but watch the dew point. That is why San Fran/bay area has high humidity levels but it usually has low dew points making SanFran feel comfortable.

Minnesota rarely gets above 75 degree dew points. However, in recent years we have seen an uptick in the water in the air due to both climate change and the increase in corn production (corn is a thirsty crop that though evapotranspiration can put a staggering amount of water in the air-3,000 to 4000 gallons per acre and Iowa alone puts out 50 billions gallons a day in the atmosphere during the summer). Minnesota production varies depending on the markets between corn and soy. Yes, Minnesota has an increased amount of water in the air than in the past. But, we are not like parts of the south with some truly killer dew points.
There is no better measure of how humid a place is than, well, the humidity.

Look, I get that you feel that it’s too damp here for your taste, but the data shows that relative to other cities in the country this is not among the most humid.

I accept that you don’t like the weather. If it becomes unbearable, you might consider a move to the mountains or desert.

Last edited by Glenfield; 10-31-2018 at 10:53 AM..
Rate this post positively Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
 
Old 10-31-2018, 10:51 AM
 
425 posts, read 229,004 times
Reputation: 1116
Quote:
Originally Posted by Glenfield View Post
There is no better measure of how humid a place is than, well, the humidity.

Look, I get that you feel that it’s too damp here for your taste, but the data shows that relative to other cities in the country this is not among the most humid and it is silly to say it is. .

I accept that you don’t like the weather. If it becomes unbearable, you might consider a move to the mountains or desert.
Do you have me confused with another poster (This is my first post on the subject)? My post doesn't reflect a preference or a judgement about Minnesota's Humidity but more of explanation about dew point and how it relates to humidity. More importantly about how weather "feels" in relation to humidity. Of course, I didn't take the step further into absolute vs. relative humidity but more alluded to it in the explanation.
Rate this post positively Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
Please register to post and access all features of our very popular forum. It is free and quick. Over $68,000 in prizes has already been given out to active posters on our forum. Additional giveaways are planned.

Detailed information about all U.S. cities, counties, and zip codes on our site: City-data.com.


Reply
Please update this thread with any new information or opinions. This open thread is still read by thousands of people, so we encourage all additional points of view.

Quick Reply
Message:


Settings
X
Data:
Loading data...
Based on 2000-2020 data
Loading data...

123
Hide US histogram

Over $104,000 in prizes was already given out to active posters on our forum and additional giveaways are planned!

Go Back   City-Data Forum > U.S. Forums > Minnesota > Minneapolis - St. Paul

All times are GMT -6.

© 2005-2021, Advameg, Inc. · Please obey Forum Rules · Terms of Use and Privacy Policy · Bug Bounty

City-Data.com - Contact Us - Archive 1, 2, 3, 4, 5, 6, 7, 8, 9, 10, 11, 12, 13, 14, 15, 16, 17, 18, 19, 20, 21, 22, 23, 24, 25, 26, 27, 28, 29, 30, 31, 32, 33, 34, 35, 36, 37 - Top