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Old 01-28-2013, 08:57 AM
 
2,515 posts, read 5,436,450 times
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Backwards state living in the past. Glad I got out when I graduated High School. I can only shake my head at the antiquated ideologies that people are clinging to.
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Old 01-28-2013, 10:00 AM
 
Location: Northwest Hills, CT
352 posts, read 728,994 times
Reputation: 241
Quote:
Originally Posted by JacksonPanther View Post
At least try to be honest and admit that the whole "admitting priviledges" thing is just a smokescreen to close the clinic. It doesn't improve anyone's care.
100% correct.
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Old 01-28-2013, 11:35 AM
 
Location: Mishawaka, Indiana
7,009 posts, read 11,104,030 times
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Honestly, I was surprised Mississippi hasn't outlawed abortion yet, and Alabama has.
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Old 01-28-2013, 12:48 PM
 
26 posts, read 52,731 times
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Another option would be to allow any physician to simply do surgery of any type in his/her office and let the patient beware. It is a bit hard to justify that other physicians have to comply with the law and have a way to admit AND treat a patient whom they injure, communicating with hospital, providing background and info on what started the problem. Now we know that all drs don't do things perfectly, but allowing one type of surgery in a kind of 'fly by the seat of our pants' while making other adhere to rules? How can anyone justify that? Are women who decide to obtain a legal abortion so 'bad' that they can be allowed to just find their own way to the emergency room & try to explain what procedure was used, what anesthetic they've had, how long since the event, etc? Many women are ashamed of having gone through this and may or may not reveal how far along they were, who aborted them, what happened - just let em 'figger it out on their own' and absolve the physician & clinic of any responsibility for care?

Somehow I think our legislature made the right decision, although undoubtedly some members simply hoped to cut down the number of procedures. Rather like 'hate crimes' do we now judge a law by the personal motivation of those voting for it? We need to look at what it does for the person it supposedly protects. If an abortion clinic is running clean and orderly, there should be no problem requiring their physicians to be able to admit. This clinic has decided that they do not wish to comply and will continue until they probably will be shut down, rather than spend a bit more to hire someone who can acquire admitting privileges. Doesn't say much for how they care for their patients.
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Old 01-28-2013, 01:15 PM
 
Location: Johns Island
2,415 posts, read 3,981,725 times
Reputation: 3559
Quote:
Originally Posted by SandiK View Post
Another option would be to allow any physician to simply do surgery of any type in his/her office and let the patient beware. It is a bit hard to justify that other physicians have to comply with the law and have a way to admit AND treat a patient whom they injure, communicating with hospital, providing background and info on what started the problem. Now we know that all drs don't do things perfectly, but allowing one type of surgery in a kind of 'fly by the seat of our pants' while making other adhere to rules? How can anyone justify that? Are women who decide to obtain a legal abortion so 'bad' that they can be allowed to just find their own way to the emergency room & try to explain what procedure was used, what anesthetic they've had, how long since the event, etc? Many women are ashamed of having gone through this and may or may not reveal how far along they were, who aborted them, what happened - just let em 'figger it out on their own' and absolve the physician & clinic of any responsibility for care?
Again this doesn't make sense. If the procedure went wrong and the patient needed to be hospitalized, do you really think UMMC/CMMC/whatever are not going to listen to and ask the doctor for all the details that led up to the need for hospitalization? You think because a doctor doesn't have admitting priviledges, that the admitting hospital refuses to talk to the attending doctor? If that's not clear enough, imagine this example - your doctor has admitting priviledges at one hospital - does that mean you are forced to only go to that particular hospital?

This is nonsense. Admitting priviledges is a purely administrative hoop that has no bearing on patient care.


Quote:
Originally Posted by SandiK View Post
Somehow I think our legislature made the right decision, although undoubtedly some members simply hoped to cut down the number of procedures. Rather like 'hate crimes' do we now judge a law by the personal motivation of those voting for it? We need to look at what it does for the person it supposedly protects. If an abortion clinic is running clean and orderly, there should be no problem requiring their physicians to be able to admit. This clinic has decided that they do not wish to comply and will continue until they probably will be shut down, rather than spend a bit more to hire someone who can acquire admitting privileges. Doesn't say much for how they care for their patients.
The local Jackson hospitals have made it clear that they will not provide admitting priviledges to any doctor that works at the clinic, either for religious reasons, or for fear of bad publicity. Again, nothing to do with patient care.
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Old 01-28-2013, 01:22 PM
 
Location: Southern New Hampshire
9,496 posts, read 16,364,151 times
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Does sex ed. in Mississippi consist of "abstinence only" programs?

Just wondering ...
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Old 01-28-2013, 01:24 PM
 
Location: Jackson County, MS
40 posts, read 66,998 times
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I don't consider Mississippi's opposition to abortion a sign of backwardness at all. More and more Americans are coming to believe that abortion is murder, and is wrong. Therefore, Mississippi happens to be on the leading edge of popular opinion and cultural change on this issue.
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Old 01-28-2013, 01:29 PM
 
Location: Southern New Hampshire
9,496 posts, read 16,364,151 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by p-squared View Post
I don't consider Mississippi's opposition to abortion a sign of backwardness at all. More and more Americans are coming to believe that abortion is murder, and is wrong. Therefore, Mississippi happens to be on the leading edge of popular opinion and cultural change on this issue.
Um, no. Most rational people believe that the government has no business telling women what they can do with their own bodies, especially when the Supreme Court has said it's no one else's business.

Let's teach kids that they should never have sex outside of marriage, and see how well that works. Oh wait, that's what some states actually DO.
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Old 01-28-2013, 03:19 PM
 
2,319 posts, read 4,549,687 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by karen_in_nh_2012 View Post
Um, no. Most rational people believe that the government has no business telling women what they can do with their own bodies, especially when the Supreme Court has said it's no one else's business.

Let's teach kids that they should never have sex outside of marriage, and see how well that works. Oh wait, that's what some states actually DO.
I agree. p-squared provides no evidence or documentation for this assertion. I do not even believe there is a 50/50 split on this issue. Most people believe women should have the right to terminate pregnancies in the event of rape, incest, or if their lives are threatened. There is absolutely no agreement about abortion, even among the religious.

In MS it takes a special school board vote to allow a non-abstinence focused sex ed class. (Mississippi School Health Policies - Mississippi Office of Healthy Schools) I'm guessing those folks would never get reelected so . . . . hmmm. Does anyone know of any school district that permits sex ed classes to deal with real prevention? Where I grew up, it's abstinence only, and I can't tell you how many girls had babies before marriage. All Southern Baptists too, I might add.
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Old 01-28-2013, 03:25 PM
 
Location: Tennessee
10,688 posts, read 6,963,230 times
Reputation: 4668
Default Medical care

Quote:
Originally Posted by JacksonPanther View Post
This doesn't make any sense. If a patient at the clinic needs to go to a hospital, what exactly does "not having admitting priviledges" even mean? You think UMMC is going to just let them bleed out on their doorstep, because the clinic doctor "doesn't have admitting priviledges?" Not unless they want to get sued up the wazoo.

At least try to be honest and admit that the whole "admitting priviledges" thing is just a smokescreen to close the clinic. It doesn't improve anyone's care.
In order for a physician to have admitting privileges at any hospital, they must make application to the hospital, pay a relatively small fee, and sometimes be part of the "on-call" staff by allowing themselves to be assigned to night or weekend duty in the event there is a "call" for a physician of their specialty.

I wouldn't be surprised that the right to life movement is so strong in Mississippi that no hospital will even offer privileges to an abortionist physician. Mississippians are a proud and strong-willed people. However, their stance on abortion as a whole, may be detrimental to the overall fiscal and physical care of a large portion of the many poor that live within the state. Rich Mississipians just go out of state for their abortions should the need arise.

Yes, I know for many it is a moral issue--it is for me too--I just don't feel like imposing my moral priorities on other folks. And this is not a thread about abortion--it is about WHY the state is shutting down a clinic. The government is always a reflection of the people it governs.
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