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Old 09-10-2017, 07:27 PM
 
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I was curious what are some Mississippian historic cities and towns where you can see an abundance of antebellum plantations and/or antebellum/Victorian era mansions and homes, along with lots of those trees typical of the South (I think they're called magnolias?). Like something out of Gone with the Wind.
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Old 09-10-2017, 09:21 PM
 
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Natchez. Natchez has the most antebellum houses in the state. Go during the Fall Pilgrimage to get house tours: Fall Pilgrimage - Natchez Pilgrimage Tours

They also have a Spring Pilgrimage.

More on the Pilgrimage here: Natchez Pilgrimage Tours

other places that may have a pilgrimage with plenty of antebellum homes:

Oxford

Vicksburg

Columbus

Carrollton (near Greenwood)

Raymond (near Jackson)

Port Gibson

Canton (near Jackson)
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Old 09-11-2017, 03:01 AM
 
Location: 78745
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Katebrowne View Post
I was curious what are some Mississippian historic cities and towns where you can see an abundance of antebellum plantations and/or antebellum/Victorian era mansions and homes, along with lots of those trees typical of the South (I think they're called magnolias?). Like something out of Gone with the Wind.
I 'd almost bet the trees are Live Oaks. Or Southern Live Oaks.

Spanish moss from those live oaks is what drapes the driveways and streets thru out the Very Deep South. I don't know how far North they will grow, but it's not very far.

Here's a pic I found online.

https://goo.gl/images/S5bjN2
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Old 09-16-2017, 06:04 PM
Status: "Not a Communism, just a KHAMnist." (set 5 days ago)
 
Location: Dallas, TX
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Katebrowne View Post
I was curious what are some Mississippian historic cities and towns where you can see an abundance of antebellum plantations and/or antebellum/Victorian era mansions and homes, along with lots of those trees typical of the South (I think they're called magnolias?). Like something out of Gone with the Wind.
Quote:
Originally Posted by emmerich01 View Post
Natchez. Natchez has the most antebellum houses in the state. Go during the Fall Pilgrimage to get house tours: Fall Pilgrimage - Natchez Pilgrimage Tours

They also have a Spring Pilgrimage.

More on the Pilgrimage here: Natchez Pilgrimage Tours

other places that may have a pilgrimage with plenty of antebellum homes:

Oxford

Vicksburg

Columbus

Carrollton (near Greenwood)

Raymond (near Jackson)

Port Gibson

Canton (near Jackson)
Emmerich covered it well. A minor quibble about typical trees. Magnolias, while common, are not typical. Pine trees vastly outnumber magnolias in south and central Mississippi and, to a degree, along the coast. North Mississippi away from "The Delta" has less pines but still not uncommon. The Delta (Northwest of Jackson) is pretty much devoid of pines unless someone planted them. That's all "bottomland hardwood".

Quote:
Originally Posted by Ivory Lee Spurlock View Post
I 'd almost bet the trees are Live Oaks. Or Southern Live Oaks.

Spanish moss from those live oaks is what drapes the driveways and streets thru out the Very Deep South. I don't know how far North they will grow, but it's not very far.

Here's a pic I found online.

https://goo.gl/images/S5bjN2
It's mainly along the coast, I would think. I can say for sure that along the I-20 corridor, including north Louisiana, Spanish Moss is rare to nonexistent. Certainly in North Mississippi its rare almost to the vanishing point (if not completely so).
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Old 09-16-2017, 08:05 PM
 
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Here's the rest of MS towns that had significant populations in 1860 & 1870: Brandon, Brookhaven, Fayette, Grand Gulf, Hillsborough, Holly Springs, Jackson, Lexington, Liberty, Macon, Monticello, Ripley, Rodney. There's probably more historical info on the websites for these towns.
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Old 09-17-2017, 09:55 AM
 
Location: The South
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Katebrowne View Post
I was curious what are some Mississippian historic cities and towns where you can see an abundance of antebellum plantations and/or antebellum/Victorian era mansions and homes, along with lots of those trees typical of the South (I think they're called magnolias?). Like something out of Gone with the Wind.
The Windsor Ruins, Port Gibson, Mississippi
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Old 09-17-2017, 01:33 PM
Status: "Furloughed, stuck at home." (set 20 days ago)
 
Location: Southeast Arizona
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I've personally been to Vicksburg, Natchez and Oxford.

I'd also add Corinth to the list if you want a combination of Antebellum properties and Civil War history as well.

I also need to see Canton, Carrollton, Raymond and Port Gibson. Lots of Civil War engagements were fought in the latter two.
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Old 09-17-2017, 05:01 PM
 
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Carrolton's Pilgrimage is 7 October. It's a great small town, just not many good jobs with a couple hours drive.
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Old 09-17-2017, 05:07 PM
 
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Phil, you asked where I found this info. It is from "Population History of Eastern U.S. Cities and Towns, 1790-1870"by Riley Moffat. If you'd like to find a copy for yourself, check ebay, amazon, or bookfinder.com/ Best wishes.


Quote:
Originally Posted by Phil75230 View Post
Emmerich covered it well. A minor quibble about typical trees. Magnolias, while common, are not typical. Pine trees vastly outnumber magnolias in south and central Mississippi and, to a degree, along the coast. North Mississippi away from "The Delta" has less pines but still not uncommon. The Delta (Northwest of Jackson) is pretty much devoid of pines unless someone planted them. That's all "bottomland hardwood".



It's mainly along the coast, I would think. I can say for sure that along the I-20 corridor, including north Louisiana, Spanish Moss is rare to nonexistent. Certainly in North Mississippi its rare almost to the vanishing point (if not completely so).
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