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Old 07-03-2019, 09:24 AM
 
Location: Mississippi
1,108 posts, read 2,269,501 times
Reputation: 1533

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The state of Mississippi is attempting to make it illegal for food manufacturers to use the term "Vegan Burger" along with other descriptive terms for meatless products that they say will cause confusion among consumers. There is a lawsuit too.

https://www.usatoday.com/story/money...it/1630857001/


"According to the lawsuit, the 2019 law forbids sellers of plant-based foods from using the following phrases: "vegan burgers," "meatless hot dogs," "vegan bacon," "meatless meatballs," "vegan chorizo" and "meatless steaks."

The lawsuit said that Upton's Naturals has been selling a variety of plant- and fruit-based foods since 2006 and its products have become popular throughout the country.

Upton's "proudly" marks its products as vegan, the lawsuit said, and no reasonable customer would be misled by the term "vegan bacon."


To me the term "burger" is descriptive of a patty in a bun. I wouldn't possibly mistake a "Vegan Burger" for one with meat. Seems ridiculous to me, and I have to wonder who's pockets are getting filled.

Last edited by jhadorn; 07-03-2019 at 09:52 AM..
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Old 07-03-2019, 10:00 AM
 
Location: NE Mississippi
18,614 posts, read 10,924,346 times
Reputation: 26097
This made the newspaper because it happened in Mississippi. The same law exists in Missouri, but was not covered quite so well. It is also a law in South Dakota. The FDA has cracked down on what can be called "milk".



As this article explains the debate is also active in Europe where the French passes a similar law.


Just because you and I don't agree with or understand the issues, does not mean someone's pocket is being filled.
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Old 07-03-2019, 10:05 AM
 
Location: Mississippi
1,108 posts, read 2,269,501 times
Reputation: 1533
Quote:
Originally Posted by Listener2307 View Post
This made the newspaper because it happened in Mississippi. The same law exists in Missouri, but was not covered quite so well. It is also a law in South Dakota.



As this article explains the debate is also active in Europe where the French passes a similar law.


Just because you and I don't agree with or understand the issues, does not mean someone's pocket is being filled.
Also doesn't mean someone's pockets aren't being filled in the most corrupt state in the U.S. Don't want people to question this stuff? Then don't be the most corrupt state in the country.

If someone doesn't know what vegan means they should learn, kinda like we learned the difference between a chair and a lightpost. People are being too sensitive and protective. What happened to buying a product, even if you don't know exactly what it is when buying it, then deciding you don't like it and will never buy it again?

Also doesn't mean I can't wonder who's pockets are being filled when something comes across that could be considered to be lobbying from the the meat industry.

Last edited by jhadorn; 07-03-2019 at 10:58 AM..
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Old 07-03-2019, 12:31 PM
 
Location: NE Mississippi
18,614 posts, read 10,924,346 times
Reputation: 26097

Ranked by most corrupt:

#1 Wyoming
#2 Michigan
#3 South Dakota
#4 Delaware
#5 Nevada
#6 Pennsylvania
#7 Kansas
#8 Oklahoma
#9 Louisiana
#10 Maine
#11 Oregon
#12 North Dakota
#13 South Carolina
#14 Vermont
#15 Texas.
Source: Center for Public Integrity.

https://publicintegrity.org/state-po...for-integrity/
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Old 07-03-2019, 01:07 PM
 
Location: Mississippi
1,108 posts, read 2,269,501 times
Reputation: 1533
Quote:
Originally Posted by Listener2307 View Post

Ranked by most corrupt:

#1 Wyoming
#2 Michigan
#3 South Dakota
#4 Delaware
#5 Nevada
#6 Pennsylvania
#7 Kansas
#8 Oklahoma
#9 Louisiana
#10 Maine
#11 Oregon
#12 North Dakota
#13 South Carolina
#14 Vermont
#15 Texas.
Source: Center for Public Integrity.

https://publicintegrity.org/state-po...for-integrity/
Well that's great. It's fallen in the last few years. Maybe because they are being called on their BS by the FBI.

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Operat...issippi_Hustle

https://www.thenewamerican.com/cultu...ys-a-new-study

http://www.upress.state.ms.us/books/546

https://www.motherjones.com/politics...prison-hustle/

https://www.clarionledger.com/story/...cy/2602517002/

https://www.clarionledger.com/story/...dal/670417001/

It still isn't good. I found the rankings you referenced and they were from 2017 anyway. I highly doubt there are 15 states more corrupt than Mississippi, especially since it was the most corrupt state in 2014. I think we both know the truth.

Last edited by jhadorn; 07-03-2019 at 01:28 PM..
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Old 07-03-2019, 07:22 PM
 
Location: Pacific Northwest & NYC Central Park South
3,323 posts, read 4,580,799 times
Reputation: 12558
Many years back, I described somebody as being 'Howdy Doody'. And from the responses, I gleaned that the pejorative, 'Howdy Doody', originated with a puppet - a very CREEPY PUPPET, on a children's show, from when my mother was a kid. https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=DIslhp9vqqw

Dowager Soybean Empress, who actually remembers Howdy Doody, if vaguely, says that Ag Commissioner Andy Gipson is a dead ringer for Howdy Doody. "Gloria, when he's got that plaid shirt on, with the cowboy hat, he gives me chills - and not good chills, either. That joker's SCARY."

And apparently, Gipson is the creepy little puppet of one special interest or another. ....right along with Guuuvnerrrrrrrrr Bouffant (Do these guys go to speech therapists, to get their 'R'-sounds extra-hard, so they'll sound extra-redneck?). But Gipson seems WAAAAAY off the deep end - like maybe Sociopathy is in the rearview mirror, and Psychopathy is at the very next intersection. He makes Guuuvnerrrrrrrrr Bouffant seem normal by comparison. I realize that in Mississippi, it's important to out-redneck your opponents, if you aim to win elections. But this guy is trying much too hard.

'Hot Dog' and 'Burger' are extremely generic, SUBJECTIVE terms. As long as they are used to describe safe, edible food products, I don't see how, in a fair and rational world, governments could, or would seek to bar marketers from using the terms, when it's so abundantly clear that no deception is intended, and no material harm is likely to accrue from ingestion of the products.

What's next? Banning the term, 'Ice Cream Sandwich'?

I'm remembering our visit to Sedona, where we had our first 'Black Bean Burgers' (really, really, really good). I guess those will be illegal in Mississippi, too...

Last edited by GrandviewGloria; 07-03-2019 at 07:47 PM..
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Old 07-04-2019, 11:53 PM
 
141 posts, read 79,963 times
Reputation: 434
Of course the politicians have been paid off.

Someone is in charge and passed and signed the bill, which means someone probably representing the beef or chicken industry likely promised someone else money. (Of course the politicians will reference something from the old testament that commands us to eat animals, etc.)

This is no different than the British parliament around the 1700s which passed a law requiring all British clothes to be made of wool, which was made guess where....England. That act of public benevolence was a payoff to wool makers who were getting their clocks cleaned by American cotton and Indian calico, and guess who got a cut of the wool industry's profits...those upstanding members of parliament. The only protection for the public from such corruption is having a diversity of economic interests represented in government, in order to prevent individual industries from buying off the politicians at the expense of literally everyone else in the state or the country.

First we had the airport board geniuses' business trip to France. And now the state is openly in bed with the beef or chicken industries of all things. Is there anyone who isn't on the take anymore?

Texas, please send us some of your immigrants so that we can have swing voters in this state to remove these bumpkins, ASAP.
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Old 07-08-2019, 10:02 AM
 
13,973 posts, read 20,189,749 times
Reputation: 23431
It's called "lobbying", I doubt we are talking direct bribes here although sometime the boundaries are hard to define. So you have the Mississippi Farm Bureau (representing the meat industry) vs. the Plant Based Food Association (representing the interests of the vegetable industry). Such regal names!

There are precedents to deceptive labeling, much of them are in federal law. Most of them are pretty silly - i.e you can't call Ice Cream as such unless it has a certain percentage milk and cream. I think the problem is more the government acting as nanny, something that usually doesn't happen in MS politics and regulations.

But hey, the "Plant Based Food Association" just has to find better lobbyist.
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Old 07-09-2019, 03:56 PM
 
141 posts, read 79,963 times
Reputation: 434
Lobbying is fine to me, because there has to be some way for people to access politicians. And there has to be a way for politicians to vet their visitors in order to understand the people with whom they are dealing. That's all fine.

And yes, there is no need for the politicians to take direct bribes. Instead, they provide favors to those who either directly or indirectly contribute to their campaign. And if they're particularly shrewd, they might find a way to get a piece of the action long after the legislative favor, say through some nice contracts for their family business. This dynamic is how political parties stay in power, and all those political favors ultimately are paid for through higher tax rates, which result in a dead economy for the rest of us. And shielding local businesses from competition is the fastest way to make a state or a country impoverished (e.g. India, Brazil).

What's sad is that the Mississippi politicians engaging in such obvious corruption are not even hiding it, because they believe Republicans can never lose in Mississippi. They're in for a shock, as neighboring Texas, Florida, and Georgia are all right on the cusp of changing sides, as their state demographics are changing at exactly the same time as Republicans are branding themselves as looking down on everyone who is not exactly like them.
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Old 07-09-2019, 04:18 PM
 
13,973 posts, read 20,189,749 times
Reputation: 23431
Quote:
Originally Posted by brickpatio2018 View Post
Lobbying is fine to me, because there has to be some way for people to access politicians. And there has to be a way for politicians to vet their visitors in order to understand the people with whom they are dealing. That's all fine.

And yes, there is no need for the politicians to take direct bribes. Instead, they provide favors to those who either directly or indirectly contribute to their campaign. And if they're particularly shrewd, they might find a way to get a piece of the action long after the legislative favor, say through some nice contracts for their family business. This dynamic is how political parties stay in power, and all those political favors ultimately are paid for through higher tax rates, which result in a dead economy for the rest of us. And shielding local businesses from competition is the fastest way to make a state or a country impoverished (e.g. India, Brazil).

What's sad is that the Mississippi politicians engaging in such obvious corruption are not even hiding it, because they believe Republicans can never lose in Mississippi. They're in for a shock, as neighboring Texas, Florida, and Georgia are all right on the cusp of changing sides, as their state demographics are changing at exactly the same time as Republicans are branding themselves as looking down on everyone who is not exactly like them.

And that matters exactly ZERO! Have you ever heard of primaries? Republicans do run against other republicans just like democrats run against other democrats. Nor is changing parties and demographics relevant, and if it were to occur, with your melodramatic cynicism, one must assume one corrupt politician will be replaced by another corrupt politician as we likewise assume that corruption is not limited to one party or another.
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