U.S. CitiesCity-Data Forum Index
Covid-19 Information Page
Go Back   City-Data Forum > U.S. Forums > Mississippi
 [Register]
Please register to participate in our discussions with 2 million other members - it's free and quick! Some forums can only be seen by registered members. After you create your account, you'll be able to customize options and access all our 15,000 new posts/day with fewer ads.
View detailed profile (Advanced) or search
site with Google Custom Search

Search Forums  (Advanced)
Reply Start New Thread
 
Old 07-11-2019, 11:30 AM
 
Location: plano
7,484 posts, read 9,223,740 times
Reputation: 7162

Advertisements

With this relatively weak hurricane brewing in the gulf, how far north into mississippi do residents worry about wind damage from this strength storm? How about flooding are part os Jackson at risk with a wet storm like this if it moves slowly through the area?
Rate this post positively Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message

 
Old 07-11-2019, 11:55 AM
 
14,037 posts, read 20,256,568 times
Reputation: 23573
Storm surge does the most damage, obviously that is only along the coast. Wind damage as well, but hurricanes collapse quickly when they hit land and no longer have warm water to feed on.

For a minimal hurricane I wouldn't worry at all about being in Jackson, some wind, some rain, no big deal...except for tornadoes that can spin off but you don't need a hurricane for that. That's a typical spring storm for us in the mid-south.

Also if you live in a trailer park - because God seems to hate trailer parks and will target those specifically.
Rate this post positively Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
 
Old 07-11-2019, 03:22 PM
 
Location: Floribama
17,470 posts, read 35,378,130 times
Reputation: 16728
Generally within about a hundred miles inland is where most of the wind damage occurs. I’m in Alabama but I live about 55 miles inland, and my town got pretty severe damage from Ivan (2004) and Fredrick (1979).

Hurricane Michael last year flattened forests well into Georgia. Generally they don’t weaken much until the whole eye is over land. If you look at the FL panhandle for example, by the time the southern eyewall is on land, the northern eyewall is already crossing into Alabama.
Rate this post positively Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
 
Old 07-12-2019, 07:03 AM
 
Location: plano
7,484 posts, read 9,223,740 times
Reputation: 7162
Thanks both, that is about what I figured. I lived in Houston for decades and my biggest fear was flooding which happened with tropical storm Harvey. Fortunately we had moved to DFW by then we are about 300 miles inland from the gulf and more hills and better drainage over all than Houston. I was in New Orleans for a summer job in 1969 when Camille came into the coast of Mississippi. Tornadoes do not scare me as their impact area is small but a hurricane is a whole other thing
Rate this post positively Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
 
Old 07-12-2019, 12:39 PM
 
14,037 posts, read 20,256,568 times
Reputation: 23573
Quote:
Originally Posted by Johnhw2 View Post
Thanks both, that is about what I figured. I lived in Houston for decades and my biggest fear was flooding which happened with tropical storm Harvey. Fortunately we had moved to DFW by then we are about 300 miles inland from the gulf and more hills and better drainage over all than Houston. I was in New Orleans for a summer job in 1969 when Camille came into the coast of Mississippi. Tornadoes do not scare me as their impact area is small but a hurricane is a whole other thing
I grew up in Central Florida. Hurricanes are nothing, I've been through enough. But I've never been more scared then when I moved to the Memphis area and went through a few tornado seasons - bad storms, then power goes out, pitch dark in the house, pitch dark outside, and then the local tornado sirens go off....those sirens - it's like an announcement "you will die in a few minutes".
Rate this post positively Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
 
Old 07-12-2019, 01:43 PM
 
Location: NE Mississippi
18,678 posts, read 10,999,684 times
Reputation: 26231
Quote:
Originally Posted by Dd714 View Post
I grew up in Central Florida. Hurricanes are nothing, I've been through enough. But I've never been more scared then when I moved to the Memphis area and went through a few tornado seasons - bad storms, then power goes out, pitch dark in the house, pitch dark outside, and then the local tornado sirens go off....those sirens - it's like an announcement "you will die in a few minutes".
.... And worst of all is the night-time tornadoes. We had a couple over the last few years and I walked outside with the dogs. Even the dogs seemed spooked by the still night air and those sirens endlessly wailing.
Rate this post positively Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
 
Old 07-12-2019, 05:37 PM
 
776 posts, read 794,976 times
Reputation: 875
Tornadoes are the worst and like Listener said night time ones are scary.
Rate this post positively Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
 
Old 07-25-2019, 07:21 PM
 
182 posts, read 134,463 times
Reputation: 366
Id say around Hattiesburg. Katrina happened right before I got to USM, they said they didn't get any damage but they did get a lot of evacuees. Tornados in that area is another story.
Rate this post positively Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
 
Old 07-29-2019, 08:19 PM
 
985 posts, read 1,029,694 times
Reputation: 1970
Quote:
Originally Posted by kgpremed13 View Post
Id say around Hattiesburg. Katrina happened right before I got to USM, they said they didn't get any damage but they did get a lot of evacuees. Tornados in that area is another story.
Katrina caused plenty of damage in H'burg and into Jackson. Rain saturates the round, weakening the soil, then wind pushes trees over.

Much of Hattiesburg was without power for a week or so due to downed trees.

Google - Hattiesburg Katrina Damage.
Rate this post positively Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
 
Old 07-30-2019, 08:43 AM
 
151 posts, read 51,942 times
Reputation: 273
Quote:
Originally Posted by viverlibre View Post
Katrina caused plenty of damage in H'burg and into Jackson. Rain saturates the round, weakening the soil, then wind pushes trees over.

Much of Hattiesburg was without power for a week or so due to downed trees.

Google - Hattiesburg Katrina Damage.
Yes, I was living in Minnesota at the time and I recall a city about 35 miles from me ( St Cloud MN...pop 70,000) deciding to help by "adopting" a specific city in Mississippi.
Hattiesburg was chosen and a delegation went from St Cloud to Hattiesburg to help out, deliver supplies, and $$$$$$$$ that had been raised.
Rate this post positively Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
Please register to post and access all features of our very popular forum. It is free and quick. Over $68,000 in prizes has already been given out to active posters on our forum. Additional giveaways are planned.

Detailed information about all U.S. cities, counties, and zip codes on our site: City-data.com.


Reply
Please update this thread with any new information or opinions. This open thread is still read by thousands of people, so we encourage all additional points of view.

Quick Reply
Message:


Settings
X
Data:
Loading data...
Based on 2000-2020 data
Loading data...

123
Hide US histogram


Over $104,000 in prizes was already given out to active posters on our forum and additional giveaways are planned!

Go Back   City-Data Forum > U.S. Forums > Mississippi

All times are GMT -6.

© 2005-2021, Advameg, Inc. · Please obey Forum Rules · Terms of Use and Privacy Policy · Bug Bounty

City-Data.com - Contact Us - Archive 1, 2, 3, 4, 5, 6, 7, 8, 9, 10, 11, 12, 13, 14, 15, 16, 17, 18, 19, 20, 21, 22, 23, 24, 25, 26, 27, 28, 29, 30, 31, 32, 33, 34, 35, 36, 37 - Top