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Old 11-15-2019, 08:39 PM
 
Location: North Jackson
2,173 posts, read 3,517,043 times
Reputation: 2987

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Quote:
Originally Posted by bfmx1 View Post
I guess I would have said it's because, when a metro sees success, many people move to there to find work, primarily lower income earners and/or minorities who generally vote for the party that promises them the most.
That's an amazing level of disrespect for the blue. I would think a significant chunk of those minorities vote for the party least likely to use anti minority rhetoric.
And people can vote for a party that in their view is more humane, even if they don't require anything.
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Old 11-17-2019, 01:50 PM
 
Location: Omaha
47 posts, read 27,615 times
Reputation: 134
Quote:
Originally Posted by bfmx1 View Post
Wow, that's an interesting theory that I haven't really thought about. I love it actually. Why do cities turn blue after x amount of success/growth?

I guess I would have said it's because, when a metro sees success, many people move to there to find work, primarily lower income earners and/or minorities who generally vote for the party that promises them the most.

Maybe a combo of the two but this should be a new thread to discuss why cities turn blue.


Anyway, you're right, Birmingham is the only real city in Alabama and it's "been there done that" stage was far deeper than anything in Mississippi. The backbone of a city is its industry/companies that provide jobs. Birmingham's corporate landscape is MUCH deeper than Jackson's giving it a huge advantage to "making it" or thriving in the next several decades.

Jackson is basically a large Gadsden.

Im not sure what kinda "Win" MS could hope for honestly.
Politically,

Blue is psychologically associated with dependence on others, social pecking order, overconfidence, dreamchasing, fantasy, and trusting others. Red is psychologically associated with survival, rational fear, providing sustinance, preparing for the future, sustaining growth, and building economic stability

This is why Republicans are better drivers and hunters and liberals are typically more artistic. Balanced and rational people are a mix of both.

The blue couldn't afford to be lacksidaisical without the vigilance of the red, and if the red never relaxed once in awhile, they'd die at 25.
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Old 11-20-2019, 12:29 AM
 
139 posts, read 78,862 times
Reputation: 424
It's worth noting that DeSoto County, Mississippi and Madison County, Alabama (Huntsville) have very similar demographics (median incomes are virtually identical) and growth rates.

DeSoto County is growing a bit faster in terms of percentage. Madison County, AL is twice as big in population (360k to 180k) so in hard numbers Madison County, AL is growing faster. But not by that much. From 2017 to 2018 Madison County, AL grew by 4,800 people and DeSoto County, MS grew by 3,000. And in terms of domestic migration (not counting local births and deaths), the difference was even smaller (3,300 and 2,100).

One notable difference is that white household incomes are about the same for both counties (71k Madison and 69k DeSoto) but black household incomes are much higher in DeSoto (50k DeSoto vs 37k Madison)

It's fair to say then DeSoto County is effectively Mississippi's version of Huntsville, Alabama in terms of growth and incomes, and Huntsville is often referenced as the nicest overall place to live in Alabama.

I predict that DeSoto's growth is going to progressively build up faster, because in certain ways it's still relatively undiscovered. In the Memphis area, many people who work in Memphis are known to live in DeSoto County, but it's never really considered that much, as compared to Germantown and Collierville, particularly among high-income households like doctors, etc. DeSoto gets a bevy of prosperous middle income households primarily. However, I see that changing over time. The reasons:

- I-269 has now opened which connects the Hernando/Southaven/Olive Branch areas to the rest of the Memphis metro including a direct line to Germantown/Collierville and on up to the I-40 corridor heading towards Nashville.

- The land in DeSoto County is rolling and bucolic. Because growth has been spread evenly across the county and at a steady but not rapid pace, the large amount of available land has presumably kept prices reasonable, allowing people to choose larger lots or acreage. So DeSoto doesn't feel as boxed in as Collierville and Germantown which have large homes on small lots for the most part.

- DeSoto County dominates Mississippi's top 10 list of best schools.

- DeSoto has an impressive array of industries atypical of your usual suburban bedroom community.

- Parts of DeSoto are a straight shot to downtown Memphis, with little traffic, thus located far more favorably that the outer suburbs to the east of Collierville and Arlington.

The new Mississippi legislature could accelerate the growth by making tax rates more competitive with Tennessee, which has no income tax. This is probably the sole reason that the very top, wealthiest households still don't move from Memphis to DeSoto in large numbers, because if a wife and husband combined make for example 250k, then moving to Mississippi will cost them an extra 12k per year in state income tax. Mississippi's lower sales and property taxes and lower land prices, plus the federal deduction for state income taxes, combined still probably don't make up for all of that hefty 12k increase in state income tax.

For economic development reasons alone, if the state of Mississippi is willing to forgo taxes to attract a Toyota, why not forgo tax dollars to attract rich doctors and lawyers to move down to DeSoto from Memphis, by finding a way to lower their state income tax rates?

In any event, maybe this forum needs to start thinking of DeSoto as Mississippi's Huntsville, because the numbers back it up.
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Old 11-20-2019, 09:02 AM
 
Location: Jack-town, Sip by way of TN, AL and FL
1,340 posts, read 980,195 times
Reputation: 2115
Quote:
Originally Posted by brickpatio2018 View Post
It's worth noting that DeSoto County, Mississippi and Madison County, Alabama (Huntsville) have very similar demographics (median incomes are virtually identical) and growth rates.

DeSoto County is growing a bit faster in terms of percentage. Madison County, AL is twice as big in population (360k to 180k) so in hard numbers Madison County, AL is growing faster. But not by that much. From 2017 to 2018 Madison County, AL grew by 4,800 people and DeSoto County, MS grew by 3,000. And in terms of domestic migration (not counting local births and deaths), the difference was even smaller (3,300 and 2,100).

One notable difference is that white household incomes are about the same for both counties (71k Madison and 69k DeSoto) but black household incomes are much higher in DeSoto (50k DeSoto vs 37k Madison)

It's fair to say then DeSoto County is effectively Mississippi's version of Huntsville, Alabama in terms of growth and incomes, and Huntsville is often referenced as the nicest overall place to live in Alabama.

I predict that DeSoto's growth is going to progressively build up faster, because in certain ways it's still relatively undiscovered. In the Memphis area, many people who work in Memphis are known to live in DeSoto County, but it's never really considered that much, as compared to Germantown and Collierville, particularly among high-income households like doctors, etc. DeSoto gets a bevy of prosperous middle income households primarily. However, I see that changing over time. The reasons:

- I-269 has now opened which connects the Hernando/Southaven/Olive Branch areas to the rest of the Memphis metro including a direct line to Germantown/Collierville and on up to the I-40 corridor heading towards Nashville.

- The land in DeSoto County is rolling and bucolic. Because growth has been spread evenly across the county and at a steady but not rapid pace, the large amount of available land has presumably kept prices reasonable, allowing people to choose larger lots or acreage. So DeSoto doesn't feel as boxed in as Collierville and Germantown which have large homes on small lots for the most part.

- DeSoto County dominates Mississippi's top 10 list of best schools.

- DeSoto has an impressive array of industries atypical of your usual suburban bedroom community.

- Parts of DeSoto are a straight shot to downtown Memphis, with little traffic, thus located far more favorably that the outer suburbs to the east of Collierville and Arlington.

The new Mississippi legislature could accelerate the growth by making tax rates more competitive with Tennessee, which has no income tax. This is probably the sole reason that the very top, wealthiest households still don't move from Memphis to DeSoto in large numbers, because if a wife and husband combined make for example 250k, then moving to Mississippi will cost them an extra 12k per year in state income tax. Mississippi's lower sales and property taxes and lower land prices, plus the federal deduction for state income taxes, combined still probably don't make up for all of that hefty 12k increase in state income tax.

For economic development reasons alone, if the state of Mississippi is willing to forgo taxes to attract a Toyota, why not forgo tax dollars to attract rich doctors and lawyers to move down to DeSoto from Memphis, by finding a way to lower their state income tax rates?

In any event, maybe this forum needs to start thinking of DeSoto as Mississippi's Huntsville, because the numbers back it up.
If it's ever going to happen, it'll be soon with Tate Reeves in office. He's all about some low taxes.

The big difference I see in Desoto and Huntsville is that Huntsville anchors its own economy, and Desoto is obviously attached to Memphis. I agree that many businesses are out in the area now, which is creating its own economy based on logistics, and I hope that continues.
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Old 11-20-2019, 10:28 PM
 
139 posts, read 78,862 times
Reputation: 424
I agree about DeSoto being an outgrowth of Memphis, certainly. But also I'm thinking that for Mississippi's purposes, an affluent and fast-growing urban area within the state should count, in terms of the state's self image.

Also, it's kind of interesting because people in DeSoto County, even if they work across the line in Memphis, definitely see themselves as living in Mississippi, and not Memphis. I've driven through the area numerous times and what stands out is that when you stop at the grocery store, Walgreens, or what have you, you don't have that feeling of being worried about being attacked. It feels organized and safe, which sets it distinctly apart from Memphis.

Of course Memphis is loaded with character, especially midtown and downtown. But nevertheless I'm starting to sense a rising feeling of pride in DeSoto County, as it grows and they begin to focus on more cultural improvements to the area. This gave me the idea that in not too much longer, let's say when the population rises to the 250k to 300k range (in roughly 15 to 25 years), it will probably be Mississippi's largest county (or maybe 2nd after Harrison by then), surpassing Hinds, and suddenly will find itself with an identity as one of Mississippi's premier urban areas and arguably one of the better places to live in the country.
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