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Old 02-07-2020, 01:55 PM
 
Location: NE Mississippi
18,606 posts, read 10,916,905 times
Reputation: 26096

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Meh ..... I trust the feds and the state government a lot more than I trust the word of someone in Parchman or the relative of someone in Parchman or in some other state prison.


The problem in prisons is usually the people in prison, not the infrastructure. I recently spoke with someone who had served time in Parchman. He said it was tough, but nothing unendurable.
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Old 02-09-2020, 05:27 PM
 
Location: Southern California
476 posts, read 584,139 times
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From around 1940 until 1972, when the Department of Justice intervened, Parchman's abuses were legendary. Punitive measures were doled out with wild enthusiasm upon the predominately black population who worked in the fields picking cotton. Apparently Parchman yielded around a million dollars a year by way of this unpaid labor. I don't know if this practice continued into the 1950s and 1960s. As far as I know Parchman still grows enough vegetables to feed every prison in Mississippi.

According to my sources Parchman raises chickens, they have some horses, (for what I don't know), an auto shop, flower gardens, AND amenities for their distinguished tracking hounds.

In, or around 2014 the population in Parchman was around 3,500 inmates and was staffed mostly by black females. To qualify one needs a GED and a clean record. With employment opportunities confined within limits in the Mississippi Delta, Parchman at least presents a chance to work for more than minimum wage and probably offers decent benefits.

Parchman is no worse than most prisons and in some ways better than others. Politicians and statesmen alike will pretend to be appalled and outraged by the egregious conditions. Adjustments will be made after a lot of handwringing. Then everyone will be pleased, at least for awhile.
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Old 02-09-2020, 08:31 PM
 
Location: Mississippi
1,108 posts, read 2,269,089 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Listener2307 View Post
Meh ..... I trust the feds and the state government a lot more than I trust the word of someone in Parchman or the relative of someone in Parchman or in some other state prison.


The problem in prisons is usually the people in prison, not the infrastructure. I recently spoke with someone who had served time in Parchman. He said it was tough, but nothing unendurable.
The problem with that mindset is that nobody else is going to tell you about the conditions in the prison. Not the guards, not the administration, and why would they? Therefore, their word deserves to be considered, and the conditions investigated. To ignore it is to give them no recourse for the conditions they are possibly subjected to.

I will reiterate. Yes, they are prisoners, but they have constitutional rights. Heaven forbid you or someone you love is imprisoned, falsely or otherwise, and subjected to inhumane conditions and nobody believes them. No, I do not have a family member or friend in prison, however, I support basic rights for everyone.

The feds are investigating because of the word of the prisoners. I'm glad to know someone is listening to them. If it turns out to be false so be it, but if it turns out to be true at least someone is doing something.
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Old 02-09-2020, 09:15 PM
 
Location: Mississippi
1,108 posts, read 2,269,089 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Listener2307 View Post
...The problem in prisons is usually the people in prison, not the infrastructure. I recently spoke with someone who had served time in Parchman. He said it was tough, but nothing unendurable.
That's why there has to be oversight and rules. People in prison aren't always good people, that's why many of them are there. Also, the right people have to be overseeing, or you get what has been alleged.

The thing about someone serving years ago is that conditions can change. You take a former prisoner's word that conditions were not that bad then, but dismiss prisoner's claims that it is now.

I am glad the feds are looking into it because I support people's rights to be treated fairly and humanely. Like I said, if I don't support all people's rights I have no business expecting my own rights.
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Old 02-10-2020, 09:21 AM
 
Location: NE Mississippi
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Anyone care to expand on what rights might be denied prisoners?
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Old 02-10-2020, 09:59 AM
 
Location: Mississippi
1,108 posts, read 2,269,089 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Listener2307 View Post
Anyone care to expand on what rights might be denied prisoners?
Don't worry about it...
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Old 02-14-2020, 09:32 PM
 
6 posts, read 1,639 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Dd714 View Post
Appreciate your sincere re-evalation of the widespread issue. Hey, I have no respect for someone that committed a violent crime, but many in prison have simply made mistakes in life, maybe guilty of dealing a small quantity of drugs. Non-violent crimes.
I don't think boycott is the answer as the issue is too widespread and the impact is meaningless. MS politicians don't give a damn what MO citizens think, tourism isn't that significant, and MO politicians don't give a damn what MS citizens think. Simply enough - vote, write your congressman, become active in prison reform. Trump signed the "first step act" in 2019 in regards to federal prisons. That's "the first step". Let's see it apply to all state prisons. Also sentencing reform. Trust the system.
They don't even care what their own citizens think; why else is the GOP in Missouri trying to kill Clean Missouri?
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Old 03-06-2020, 11:25 PM
 
Location: Central Illinois -
25,627 posts, read 16,533,063 times
Reputation: 19729
Quote:
Originally Posted by Versatile View Post
Nowhere in particular as of yet. I will enter Ms on I-55 and I will just try to make as few stops as possible and spend any money in Mississippi as I pass through with my Skoolie. Mine is a diesel with a big tank and a large refrigerator for ham and cheese sandwiches.

I have no idea if Alabama or Louisiana is better or worse. Hell, now that I think about it; Mo. is just as bad or worse. Maybe I should just drive in circles?

Alabama is as bad, if not worse. Their prisons have been under investigation by the DOJ for years now, and I believe they recently released a scathing report on conditions in them.
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Old 03-08-2020, 09:48 AM
 
Location: Boston, MA
13,171 posts, read 9,299,576 times
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It's supposed to suck in prison. That way, when you are paroled you do everything in your power to not go back.
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Old 03-11-2020, 11:06 PM
 
Location: Tucson/Nogales
20,219 posts, read 23,726,619 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Mr. Joshua View Post
It's supposed to suck in prison. That way, when you are paroled you do everything in your power to not go back.
Innocent people are locked up every day in prisons/jails across the country, thru pressured plea agreements (Illegal in a number of countries), and those that can afford the best attorney's will never see a day in prison, like many in Washington D.C.!

How often do you read of someone released from prison due to DNA clearance? Some have served 10-20-30 years and DNA evidence freed them.

In Iran, fearful the coronavirus will sweep thru their jail/prisons they have released 1000's of inmates recently.

Prisons are a luxury to any society.

Texas found that out in the early 80's when they suffered a crippling economic recession, and they had no choice, they had to release 1000's of inmates.

That could happen in Mississippi some day and then?
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