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Old 03-27-2012, 07:47 PM
 
73,005 posts, read 62,585,728 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Listener2307 View Post
He's mostly right. Living in the delta is tough for everyone in that jobs are scarce and pay little. Seems like the delta still - to this day - has more people living there than the infrastructure can support.

If your grandparents are still with us, take the time to sit and talk to them about their life in the south. Record it, or write it down. Collect pictures, dates. addresses, names, and if you have the ability put them into book and have several copies printed. We did that for my wife's 100th birthday, and Lordy, the tears of joy! The old pictures; memories; stories you never knew......
My grandfather passed away before either or my parents met. My grandmother died when I was very young. My father, however, has told me what he knows. According to him, my grandparents left because of the Jim Crow policies in Mississippi, and the lack of opportunities. He mentioned that when my grandmother left, she never wanted to return. My grandparents were sharecroppers in the Delta region.

My father says that if he had born and raised in Mississippi, his life would have been different. He says his mentality would have been different. His parents left because they were tired of having to be subservient and "take crap". He said that Milwaukee was different because even with the racism there, it was different from Mississippi. If you lived in Mississippi and called you "boy", you had to take it, or risk consequences for it. Where he lived, you didn't have to take that. He says that his parents left the South so that they could have more in life. My father never went hungry. He didn't have ratty clothes. His parents both worked, they owned their home, albeit in a relatively rough part of town. They were able to give him nice clothes to wear, he played sports, he never went hungry. My father looks at Mississippi from what his parents went through and what he sees now.
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Old 03-28-2012, 07:07 AM
 
Location: NE Mississippi
25,567 posts, read 17,275,200 times
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Originally Posted by green_mariner View Post
................ If you lived in Mississippi and called you "boy", you had to take it, or risk consequences for it. Where he lived, you didn't have to take that. He says that his parents left the South so that they could have more in life.................
All mostly true. I grew up during the 50s and I can remember all of that. I remember when gas stations had three restroom - Men, Women & Colored - and there were two water fountains in the drug store - white and colored. My little sister was "rescued" once by a white clerk when she almost drank from the wrong water fountain; she was too young to read.
But the important point is, it is all part of history, like it or not. It would have been nice to view it through the eyes of your grandparents.

The Great Migration is part of history, too. In my travels I have been approached by a great many black folks in a great many places who were anxious to tell me of their roots in Mississippi. They are curious, I guess, and I always encourage their questions - even the ones they are afraid to ask.
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Old 03-28-2012, 09:17 AM
 
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Originally Posted by Listener2307 View Post
All mostly true. I grew up during the 50s and I can remember all of that. I remember when gas stations had three restroom - Men, Women & Colored - and there were two water fountains in the drug store - white and colored. My little sister was "rescued" once by a white clerk when she almost drank from the wrong water fountain; she was too young to read.
But the important point is, it is all part of history, like it or not. It would have been nice to view it through the eyes of your grandparents.

The Great Migration is part of history, too. In my travels I have been approached by a great many black folks in a great many places who were anxious to tell me of their roots in Mississippi. They are curious, I guess, and I always encourage their questions - even the ones they are afraid to ask.
It would have been very nice to view history through my grandparents. I wish they had lived long enough for me to be able and talk to them about it.

I couldn't imagine living during a time when there were "White" and "Colored" water fountains. I was born in the 80's and my father was born in the north, so neither one of us could imagine.

I do have some knowledge of what my father has told me about growing up in the urban north during the 60's, and about the riots too.

The Great Migration is part of my heritage. For a class project, I did a paper on the Great Migration. For me, even being born in the 80s, it's personal. I say it's personal because my grandparents were part of a larger movement.
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Old 03-28-2012, 02:04 PM
 
Location: Mississippi Delta!
468 posts, read 786,080 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Listener2307 View Post
Living in the delta is tough for everyone in that jobs are scarce and pay little. Seems like the delta still - to this day - has more people living there than the infrastructure can support.
The Mississippi Delta has been losing population since World War Two. Look at the population statistics of any county in the Delta.

God bless,

CKB
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Old 03-28-2012, 03:16 PM
 
Location: NE Mississippi
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Originally Posted by Chris Balducci View Post
The Mississippi Delta has been losing population since World War Two. Look at the population statistics of any county in the Delta.

God bless,

CKB
You're right. And, in fact, Mississippi has only doubled its population in the last 100 years. For a while I thought it must be because black folks were not counted during the early part of the 1900's, but I have learned from competent authority that even during the 1860's slaves were counted as part of the population.

Speaking honestly, I can see no reason why the delta would grow in population. Farming, the dominant industry, just doesn't take all that many people any more and river commerce just barely exists. If people find a way out of the delta they almost never go back.

The Gulf Coast, Oxford, Tupelo, Memphis suburbs....those places and some others are different. There is actual commerce and education going on in those places.
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Old 03-28-2012, 03:54 PM
 
Location: Mississippi Delta!
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I live in Cleveland, and we have Delta State University. We're not as bad off as other Delta towns. A lot of people I went to high school with ended up in a Memphis or Jackson suburb.
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Old 03-30-2012, 10:16 AM
 
169 posts, read 237,712 times
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Originally Posted by Spot View Post
I am curious as to why anyone would want to live in Mississippi. I've been there a couple of times and I just don't see what is appealing about the place. Why do you live there?
Most of us can't afford to live anywhere else or we would. trust me. but the weather is nice
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Old 03-30-2012, 02:48 PM
 
73,005 posts, read 62,585,728 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Listener2307 View Post
You're right. And, in fact, Mississippi has only doubled its population in the last 100 years. For a while I thought it must be because black folks were not counted during the early part of the 1900's, but I have learned from competent authority that even during the 1860's slaves were counted as part of the population.

Speaking honestly, I can see no reason why the delta would grow in population. Farming, the dominant industry, just doesn't take all that many people any more and river commerce just barely exists. If people find a way out of the delta they almost never go back.

The Gulf Coast, Oxford, Tupelo, Memphis suburbs....those places and some others are different. There is actual commerce and education going on in those places.
Every person I've ever met from that area has a very grim view of it. I know one person who wants out really bad, but can't afford to leave.
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Old 03-31-2012, 11:15 AM
 
Location: NE Mississippi
25,567 posts, read 17,275,200 times
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Originally Posted by green_mariner View Post
Every person I've ever met from that area has a very grim view of it. I know one person who wants out really bad, but can't afford to leave.
It's tough being stuck in an area that you dislike. But when you think about it, and awful lot of people are in that category. Person A wants to leave California, but can't make enough money anywhere else; person B would like to leave Ohio and take a better job, but he's underwater on his mortgage so he can't leave. Person C would rather live a simple life in Mississippi, but there is no job for him.
And the person in the delta has never made more than $10/hour and just can't see a way to leave.

Sometimes ya just gotta gather up the gonads and go for it.
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Old 03-31-2012, 11:23 AM
 
73,005 posts, read 62,585,728 times
Reputation: 21906
Quote:
Originally Posted by Listener2307 View Post
It's tough being stuck in an area that you dislike. But when you think about it, and awful lot of people are in that category. Person A wants to leave California, but can't make enough money anywhere else; person B would like to leave Ohio and take a better job, but he's underwater on his mortgage so he can't leave. Person C would rather live a simple life in Mississippi, but there is no job for him.
And the person in the delta has never made more than $10/hour and just can't see a way to leave.

Sometimes ya just gotta gather up the gonads and go for it.
That is true. My grandparents were sharecroppers, left everything to seek opportunities elsewhere.
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