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Old 09-23-2019, 07:07 AM
 
Location: StlNoco Mo, where the woodbine twineth
9,999 posts, read 8,471,012 times
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Morgan County Democrat (Versailles Mo) September 9, 1904 Pg2

T.J. Jackson, a resident of Hughesville, who was under suspicion of having committed numerous thefts in that town, was caught by a party of vigilantes at an early hour Sunday morning as he was milking cows in a pasture near the town. Jackson made a gun-play, when J.B. Mockbee, a Hughesville merchant, fired upon him with a shotgun. Eighty-nine shot entered Jackson's legs and hips, seriously wounding him.





In July of 1883, near Prairie Ridge, Saline county, 16-year-old George Conger attacked 10-year-old Sweden Joliffe with a stick. Joliffe pulled a knife and fatally stabbed Conger, Joliffe was arrested.
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Old 09-23-2019, 06:35 PM
 
Location: StlNoco Mo, where the woodbine twineth
9,999 posts, read 8,471,012 times
Reputation: 14545
Davis, Miller and Duvall were arrested in St. Clair county for manufacturing and passing counterfeit coins in 1883.






Rich Hill Tribune June 2, 1904 Pg5

Charles Roller, who was stabbed and nearly killed by Omar Smith at Richards sometime ago, has fully recovered. Smith was arraigned in circuit court at Nevada last week and on a plea of guilty was fined $5.00 and costs.





Warrenton, Mo., June 30, 1904

The jury in the case of William E Church, charged with murder of his foster parents, Mr. and Mrs. H.W. Yeater, on August 31, 1903, brought in a verdict today of murder in the first degree. Church's attorney has filed a motion for a new trial, which will be argued before Judge Shelton on July 23.
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Old 09-24-2019, 07:13 AM
 
Location: StlNoco Mo, where the woodbine twineth
9,999 posts, read 8,471,012 times
Reputation: 14545
Weekly Graphic (Adair Co) April 21, 1882 Pg2

THE DEATH AVENGERS

Atchison, Kan., Apr 18.--A special says it is positively known that Frank James is at the head of a movement which has for its aim the extermination of all parties whose names are associated with the death of his brother Jesse.
It is learned Frank James passed through Atchison last Friday going southwest, having with him four persons, and that on the same day Mrs. James went to Kansas City. Yesterday Frank and party returned. The new gang will be composed of material taken from the county which produced Polk Wells, Bill Morris, Jim Dougherty, John Pomfrey and others. These death avengers are backed by the entire constituency of Jesse James.





Iron County Register November 5, 1914 Pg3

REWARD FOR FUGITIVE

Gov. Major renewed for another year the reward of $100 for the capture of James Long, who has been a fugitive from Benton county since 1906. He is wanted for murder.
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Old 09-24-2019, 11:43 AM
 
Location: StlNoco Mo, where the woodbine twineth
9,999 posts, read 8,471,012 times
Reputation: 14545
Fair Play (Ste. Genevieve) December 10, 1892

TURNED A SMOOTH TRICK

James H Beets, a prominent farmer of Jackson county, was beat out of $1,500 by a confidence game the other day.
The game is an old one, and it seems strange that there are men living in this age who can be so easily gulled. The men claimed to wish to buy Beets' farm, and also said they were agents for the Louisiana state lottery, and Beets bought a ticket, which drew $1,500.
This the confidence men put in a box and Beets was required to place the same amount therein, and was given the box, which eventually proved to be empty. The men are not to be found.




The State Journal (Jefferson City) February 20, 1874 Pg3

Our readers will, many of them, recognize in the McCoy spoken of in the dispatches as implicated in the Quincy bank robbery a person who once figured in these parts.
Big Shang McCoy was the stage carpenter of Bragg Hall. He was an ex-convict. He was a United States prisoner, sent from Jackson county for counterfeiting. He went from this place to Quincy, where, it seems, he was connected with a varieties theatre.
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Old 09-25-2019, 07:01 AM
 
Location: StlNoco Mo, where the woodbine twineth
9,999 posts, read 8,471,012 times
Reputation: 14545
Cape Girardeau Democrat August 15, 1891

ORE THIEF SHOT

Charles Feazell, an ore thief, was shot at Joplin the other night while engaged in his rascally business. An organized ore-stealing gang exists at Joplin.


SHOT HIS NEIGHBOR

David Snorgrass fatally shot a neighbor named Jennings, in Pettis county. There had been bad feeling between the men for some time.


STOLE HIS TEETH

William H Stungwark, of St. Louis, reports to the police that somebody stole his false teeth. He was " gumming " it at last accounts.


ARRESTED AT THE ALTAR

Alexander Long was married in St. Louis and arrested at the altar for perjury. He swore too freely in an Illinois court.
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Old 09-25-2019, 11:13 AM
 
Location: StlNoco Mo, where the woodbine twineth
9,999 posts, read 8,471,012 times
Reputation: 14545
St. Joseph Herald May 2, 1882

CRITTENDEN ENDORSED

Kansas City, May 1---A mass meeting was held at Liberty, Clay county, today near the home of the James boys, and resolutions passed endorsing Gov. Crittenden's action, and expressing full sympathy with him in his warfare against the bandits. The meeting was largely attended and the resolutions emphatically and universally commended.




Weekly Graphic (Adair Co) April 14, 1882

For killing his counsel two years ago, George Burges, a young lawyer of Platte City, has been sentenced to five years in the penitentiary.
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Old 09-25-2019, 09:22 PM
 
Location: StlNoco Mo, where the woodbine twineth
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Kansas City Journal December 16, 1897 Pg3

TRIED A VERY SLICK SCHEME

One of the cleverest schemes to escape from the county jail that has ever been tried was attempted within the last week by L.A. Moore, a highway robber.
By eating laundry soap he succeeded so well in simulating a serious attack of sickness that he deceived several of the best doctors in the city and was removed to the city hospital for treatment.

Moore was attacked last Saturday night with what looked to the jail guards like a bad sick spell. He was lying on his bunk moaning piteously. His most severe symptom was a frothing at the mouth. The jail doctor was sent for and pronounced Moore to be in a bad condition. He said the sick prisoner ought to be sent to the city hospital for proper treatment.

The ambulance was sent for, and drove up to the jail door, but Moore was too sick to walk. He was so badly off that Tom Hyland and Walter Evans, prisoners on the same floor, had to carry him out of his cell.

The doctors at the hospital examined Moore, shook their heads wisely, and said he would probably die, and that his relatives, if he had any, ought to be notified. But Moore was too sick to speak a word, so it was feared that the poor man would die without his real name being known.

It is a rule at the hospital to shackle all sick prisoners to the iron bed, and a little before midnight this was done with Moore. When the attendant went to put the iron shackle on Moore's ankle he roused up and said weakly:
" Doctor, it's no use putting those heavy iron things on me. I'm dying anyhow."
" We will have to fasten you." said the attendant.

" Then strap me, can't you." Pleaded Moore
" I wouldn't try to get away. I couldn't get away if I had the chance. There's only a light charge against me at the jail, anyway."

Tuesday night his attendant discovered him trying to pick the lock that fastened the shackle around his ankle. That opened the eyes of the doctors, and yesterday morning they made a closer examination of Moore, and found that, after all, his sickness was nothing serious, but that Moore had brought it upon himself by eating soap. It was soap that made the froth at his mouth.

When the hospital doctors discovered this they telephoned Marshal Chiles to come and get Moore. Deputy Marshal Casimer Welch took him from the hospital to the jail yesterday morning and put him in his old cell and will keep him there.

Several other prisoners are sick or pretending to be. One of them is Ed N. Blum, the noted forger. Another is Will Johnson, who tried to kill a man.

Sickness caused by eating ordinary laundry soap has been resorted to a number of times by notorious criminals to effect an escape from prison.
A few years ago a man who was serving a life sentence in the penitentiary at Joliet, Ill., was pronounced by doctors to be in the last stages of consumption, and was pardoned for that reason by the governor. After his release he recovered rapidly, and after he had become as fat and well as ever he told with considerable pride that he had deceived the doctors by a steady diet of laundry soap.
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Old 09-26-2019, 07:36 AM
 
Location: StlNoco Mo, where the woodbine twineth
9,999 posts, read 8,471,012 times
Reputation: 14545
The Evening Missourian (Columbia) July 19, 1919

NO TRACE OF CONVICT 6663

There is still no trace of convict No. 6663, who changed his prison attire in the basement of the Troxell Furniture Company last week. The police are endeavoring to find out from what prison or workhouse a man by that number has escaped recently. It is thought that he was from the St. Louis workhouse.




Chariton Courier February 22, 1884 Pg2

FRANK JAMES

All the State cases against Frank James in Missouri have been dismissed, for the reason that the State relied chiefly upon the testimony of Dick Liddell for conviction, but owing to a recent decision of the supreme court, Liddell is held to be an incompetent witness.
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Old 09-26-2019, 04:55 PM
 
Location: StlNoco Mo, where the woodbine twineth
9,999 posts, read 8,471,012 times
Reputation: 14545
Mansfield Mirror (Wright Co) April 30, 1914

SAFE BLOWERS AT AVA

The safe in the K.C.O. & S. depot at Ava was blown up Tuesday night and $104 was secured. An attempt was also made to enter the post office.





The Monett Times July 9, 1920

CHARGED WITH STEALING EXPRESS PACKAGE

E.W. Strain, an express messenger helper, was arrested by W.P. Boyle, special agent for the American Railway Express Company, and Joe A Jackson, chief of police at Monett, on the charge of theft of an express package, which contained silk shirts and which was being returned by a Fort Smith firm to Boston.
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Old 09-26-2019, 08:53 PM
 
Location: StlNoco Mo, where the woodbine twineth
9,999 posts, read 8,471,012 times
Reputation: 14545
Kansas City Medical Index 1901

Within the past few months, twelve inmates of the state penitentiary have lost their minds.
On the advice of the prison physician, Governor Dockery recently respited the following list of crazy convicts at the penitentiary and committed them to the state asylum at Fulton.

Edward Raefing, St. Louis, robbery first degree, 9 years from Nov 8, 1900

R.J. Turner, Jackson county, forgery, 5 years from Feb 25, 1899

William Brown, alias W.E. Colligan, St. Louis, burglary 2nd degree, 4 years from June 5, 1900

Wesley Holt, colored, Jackson county, assault to kill, 2 years and 8 months, from Jan 15, 1900

Charles Barnett, Greene county, felonious assault and breaking jail, 5 years from Aug 4, 1899

George House, Cass county, burglary and larceny, 5 years from May 23, 1901

John Reynolds, Daviess county, burglary first degree, 10 years from Apr 17, 1894

Matthew Sullivan, alias Mum, St. Louis, habitual criminal and grand larceny, 5 years from Apr 5, 1901

Fred Linderman, Jackson county, murder 2nd degree, 99 years from May 18, 1899

Samuel Richmond, Ripley county, murder 2nd degree, 10 years from April 18, 1899

John Jones, colored, Jackson county, burglary and grand larceny, 5 years from Jul 6, 1899

Conway Gorman, Laclede county, train robbery, 15 years from May 30, 1896
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