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Old 08-13-2017, 07:52 AM
 
Location: StlNoco Mo, where the woodbine twineth
10,021 posts, read 8,646,805 times
Reputation: 14576

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Sullivan Tri-County News July 20, 1961




Thefts At Union

Three tires and salvage telephone batteries were stolen sometime Friday night at the West End Salvage Sales, Union Mo. The thefts were discovered at 8 o'clock Saturday morning. Union police are investigating.



Villa Ridge Burglary

The home of Mr. and Mrs. E.C. Mittler at Villa Ridge was burglarized while the family attended a funeral in St. Louis last Saturday. Reported stolen are a beverage cooler, clock radio, two flat irons, a .38 pistol and $110 in currency and coins. A watchdog apparently presented a problem to the offenders, who abandoned all but the cash in nearby woods. The articles have been recovered. The door from the garage to the kitchen of the home had been forced open to gain entry. No arrest had been made but there is an investigation.



Clubhouse Broken Into

L.W. Huber on Jennings, Mo., discovered last Sunday that fishing tackle had been stolen from his clubhouse on Highway K south of St. Clair. Sheriff H.M. Miller is investigating.
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Old 08-14-2017, 06:19 AM
 
Location: StlNoco Mo, where the woodbine twineth
10,021 posts, read 8,646,805 times
Reputation: 14576
The Sedalia Democrat April 12, 1897


A Burglar Called, Paid His Respects To Mike McGinley's This Morning

A burglar visited the home of Mike McGinley, southeast corner of Fifth street and Harrison avenue, at 2 o'clock this morning, and proceeded to make himself at home by rummaging the place from cellar to garret. It is not known how he effected an entrance, but the supposition is that he either had a key that unlocked the front door or raised a side window and crawled in. At the hour stated, Mrs. McGinley was awakened and heard what sounded like someone walking in one of the rooms downstairs. The wind was blowing outside, and she never for an instant thought of a burglar being in the house.
A few minutes later she saw the flash of a light upstairs, and a little later a second light, as if someone had struck a match. Her first thought was that it was the servant, and she called out, "Is that you?" mentioning the girl's name. This settled it, and the thief fairly flew. He must have been in his stocking feet, for he was not even heard as he descended the stairs.
By this time Mr. McGinley had been awakened and informed that there was a burglar in the house. Hurriedly arising, he armed himself and went in search of the prowler, but he had made his escape, leaving no trace of the direction in which he had gone.
Investigation revealed that the fellow had taken the precaution not to be surprised at work. The front door was left unlocked, and a portier that shut off the front hallway from the parlor was removed, so that the thief could see if anyone approached from that direction. The rear door was also unlocked, and other doors were propped open, so that the fellow would not be interrupted in the event a rapid escape was necessary. Thus prepared for work, a combination bookcase and desk in the west sitting room, in which were a number of papers, was pried open with a screwdriver belonging to the sewing machine paraphernalia.
The fellow must have been without a knife, for he used the screwdriver in gouging the wood around the lock until it looked as if rats had gnawed it. Every piece of paper in the desk was removed and scattered upon the floor, the visitor evidently being in search of money, but his only reward was a few nickles and dimes that belonged to the children, and a couple of silk mufflers, the property of Frank McGinley.
This portion of the house searched, the thief proceeded upstairs, where the entire family, including three men, sleep, and was interrupted by Mrs. McGinley awaking and calling aloud to know if it was the servant who had struck a match.
A peculiar thing in connection with the robbery, is that at 3 o'clock Sunday morning, an unknown man attempted to gain entrance to the house through the front door. He was seen by Mrs. McGinley working at the knob, and when asked what he wanted, he walked away passing east on Fifth street.
He is said to have been a tall man, well dressed, wearing a cap, long overcoat and toothpick shoes, but whether white or black is not known.
When Mr. McGinley arose yesterday morning he found a horse hitched on the west side of his residence, and he naturally supposed that the man who had visited owned the animal, but no thought was entertained of a burglar having paid his respects at the house.
It was later learned that the horse belonged to a drunk who had fallen off and the horse wandered away, someone must have found it and tied it to the nearest hitching post they could find.
Mike's only regret is that he did not realize the true situation sooner, when he heard the burglar gouging away at the bookcase downstairs, in which event Coroner Cowan would have had an inquest on his hands today.
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Old 08-14-2017, 06:52 AM
 
Location: StlNoco Mo, where the woodbine twineth
10,021 posts, read 8,646,805 times
Reputation: 14576
Gunfighters

http://ftp.rootsweb.ancestry.com/pub...ealog.gunfight





Sullivan Tri-County News November 26, 1959

Burglary Friday At Stanton Post Office

A glass door pane was broken Friday night at the store which is run in conjunction with the Stanton post office, and thieves reached through the aperture to turn the lock and walk in. Postmaster Joseph Fijan, who owns and operates the store, reports that about 50 cartons of cigarettes and 5 cheap cameras were stolen. There are no suspects. Similar entry was gained into the Stanton post office about 2 years ago, when the post office was burglarized.



On June 16, 1944, Allen Lambus, 73, of Mississippi County, was executed for murder after seven reprieves. He was put to death in Missouri's gas chamber for slaying a teenage girl with a hay-hook when she resisted his amorous advances.
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Old 08-15-2017, 06:34 AM
 
Location: StlNoco Mo, where the woodbine twineth
10,021 posts, read 8,646,805 times
Reputation: 14576
St. Louis Post-Dispatch April 14, 1906


Woman Catches Woman Burglar When Cops Fail

Mrs. Anna Atkins finds intruder in her home and gives chase.
Pursued through alley fugitive threw away money she had taken from a pocketbook. Captive says her name is Minnie Dell, but refuses to give address.
The woman burglar with red hair and green eyes who has foiled the police detectives of St. Louis for months, is a prisoner in the Dayton Street station. She was captured by Mrs. Anna Atkins of 3438 School Street who intuitively recognized the intruder in her home and chased her for more than a block into the arms of a policeman.
When arrested, the red-headed woman burglar gave the name of Helen Meyer, but later, at the station, she said her name was Minnie Dell. Her pal stood on watch outside of Mrs. Atkins' house, and was not apprehended.
The woman burglar went to the home of Mrs. Atkins Friday afternoon and rang the doorbell. There was no response, and she entered the house thinking no one was home. Her pal stood on the opposite side and kept watch to see that the woman burglar was not disturbed at her work.
Mrs. Atkins, however, was at home. She was upstairs, and hearing a sound as if someone walking, went downstairs to investigate. Mrs. Atkins saw the intruder, who had picked up a purse that contained $3. The woman started for the door and Mrs. Atkins called out for her to stop. The woman darted out the front door, dropping a silver dollar as she ran.
Mrs. Atkins, without any hesitancy, followed her to the street, calling loudly for the police. Patrolman McLaughlin, who was in the neighborhood, heard her cries and ran to the scene. He saw the woman fleeing and the other in pursuit. He joined in the chase. When the woman burglar saw the officer she darted into an alley and threw away the 2 paper dollars she had taken from the purse. The policeman overtook her before she had reached the end of the alley, and placed her under arrest.
She was taken to the Dayton Street station where she was identified by Mrs. Atkins.
The police records show that 2 women have been actively engaged in looting West End homes for more than two months, and the woman under arrest answers the description of one of the women who has been seen on nearly every occasion.
More than 20 such cases have been reported and the persons who have suffered such robberies have been requested to call at the police station to identify the prisoner.
Charles Campbell of 2732 Pine street saw the woman burglar this morning. He said that the skirt and silk waist she was wearing had been stolen from his wife.
Among others who have been robbed by the women burglars are; Mrs. James Atkins, Mrs. John H Wright, Miss Anna Green, Miss Nellie Hunt, Mrs. Berchold Waldman, Mrs. George Miltenberger, Mrs. J Elkes, and Mrs. Niles Thompson. On February 28, two women robbed 2 homes in Maplewood. One of those burglars resembled the "Dayton Street Prisoner"
Police Captain Gaffney took the woman from her cell Saturday morning and for half an hour sweated her in his private office behind closed doors. She stated that her name was Minnie Dell and only admitted to the Atkins robbery, then remained silent. She shared her cell with a negress. " We have a description of the woman who was with her yesterday, but have no name or address," said Gaffney. The other woman is young, not more than 18, and is shorter and more stout than the prisoner. She has dark hair and wore a blue dress yesterday. " I hope to land the other one today " Gaffney said.
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Old 08-15-2017, 09:03 AM
 
Location: StlNoco Mo, where the woodbine twineth
10,021 posts, read 8,646,805 times
Reputation: 14576
James Wilson Murdered Orville Lyons 1869

Douglas County, Missouri Genealogy Trails





Murderers Released To Murder Again

A List of Murderers Released to Murder Again!





Sullivan Tri-County News February 20, 1964

Sheriff's Office

Richard Shepard of rural route Pacific reported Wednesday of this week that his service station had been burglarized the night before. The loot was apparently planned to set someone up in the repair business with smokes for coffee breaks. Missing are a cash register, adding machine, distributor caps, rotors and brushes, oil filters, and a tray of miscellaneous fittings in addition to 100 cartons of assorted brand cigarettes. Entry was gained by breaking a west window when an attempt to break in the front door failed.
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Old 08-15-2017, 04:52 PM
 
Location: Alamogordo, NM
7,940 posts, read 9,505,022 times
Reputation: 5695
The Sedalia Democrat April 12, 1897


A Burglar Called, Paid His Respects To Mike McGinley's This Morning

A burglar visited the home of Mike McGinley, southeast corner of Fifth street and Harrison avenue, at 2 o'clock this morning, and proceeded to make himself at home by rummaging the place from cellar to garret. It is not known how he effected an entrance, but the supposition is that he either had a key that unlocked the front door or raised a side window and crawled in. At the hour stated, Mrs. McGinley was awakened and heard what sounded like someone walking in one of the rooms downstairs. The wind was blowing outside, and she never for an instant thought of a burglar being in the house.
A few minutes later she saw the flash of a light upstairs, and a little later a second light, as if someone had struck a match. Her first thought was that it was the servant, and she called out, "Is that you?" mentioning the girl's name. This settled it, and the thief fairly flew. He must have been in his stocking feet, for he was not even heard as he descended the stairs.
By this time Mr. McGinley had been awakened and informed that there was a burglar in the house. Hurriedly arising, he armed himself and went in search of the prowler, but he had made his escape, leaving no trace of the direction in which he had gone.
Investigation revealed that the fellow had taken the precaution not to be surprised at work. The front door was left unlocked, and a portier that shut off the front hallway from the parlor was removed, so that the thief could see if anyone approached from that direction. The rear door was also unlocked, and other doors were propped open, so that the fellow would not be interrupted in the event a rapid escape was necessary. Thus prepared for work, a combination bookcase and desk in the west sitting room, in which were a number of papers, was pried open with a screwdriver belonging to the sewing machine paraphernalia.
The fellow must have been without a knife, for he used the screwdriver in gouging the wood around the lock until it looked as if rats had gnawed it. Every piece of paper in the desk was removed and scattered upon the floor, the visitor evidently being in search of money, but his only reward was a few nickles and dimes that belonged to the children, and a couple of silk mufflers, the property of Frank McGinley.
This portion of the house searched, the thief proceeded upstairs, where the entire family, including three men, sleep, and was interrupted by Mrs. McGinley awaking and calling aloud to know if it was the servant who had struck a match.
A peculiar thing in connection with the robbery, is that at 3 o'clock Sunday morning, an unknown man attempted to gain entrance to the house through the front door. He was seen by Mrs. McGinley working at the knob, and when asked what he wanted, he walked away passing east on Fifth street.
He is said to have been a tall man, well dressed, wearing a cap, long overcoat and toothpick shoes, but whether white or black is not known.
When Mr. McGinley arose yesterday morning he found a horse hitched on the west side of his residence, and he naturally supposed that the man who had visited owned the animal, but no thought was entertained of a burglar having paid his respects at the house.
It was later learned that the horse belonged to a drunk who had fallen off and the horse wandered away, someone must have found it and tied it to the nearest hitching post they could find.
Mike's only regret is that he did not realize the true situation sooner, when he heard the burglar gouging away at the bookcase downstairs, in which event Coroner Cowan would have had an inquest on his hands today.


Oh, the nerve of some crooks, eh, aliasfinn?
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Old 08-16-2017, 05:28 AM
 
Location: StlNoco Mo, where the woodbine twineth
10,021 posts, read 8,646,805 times
Reputation: 14576
^^^^ Notice that the descriptions of most of these burglars are that they were well dressed ?

Even when they sneak into someone's house while the owners are sleeping and steal a few nickels and dimes that belonged to children, they still take pride in their appearance.
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Old 08-16-2017, 05:41 AM
 
Location: StlNoco Mo, where the woodbine twineth
10,021 posts, read 8,646,805 times
Reputation: 14576
The Sullivan News June 6, 1940

5 Little Boys Rob Washington Pipe Factory

Five boys, ranging in ages from 5 to 11, broke into the Missouri Meerschaum Factory Sunday and stole some pipes and bits, candy, a fountain pen and pocket knife. They were soon caught by police and confessed their error. One boy confessed to raising a window and unlocking a door to admit the other boys. They then broke the glass front on the candy machine and took some of the candy. The boys will be required to report to the chief of police in Washington at regular intervals and, pending good behavior, will be given no more punishment. The chief of police has promised he will do all he can to keep the boys straight and out of court.

(Figures the candy machine would get hit)






St. Charles Mail Robbery 1921

Preservation Journal
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Old 08-16-2017, 06:45 AM
 
Location: StlNoco Mo, where the woodbine twineth
10,021 posts, read 8,646,805 times
Reputation: 14576
Moberly Monitor February 22, 1955


Priest Is Shot And Wounded During Mass At St. Louis By Woman Described As Former Mental Patient



St. Louis---A Roman Catholic priest was shot today, while saying mass in a church here by a woman described by police as a former mental patient.
The Rev. Andrew B Schierhoff, assistant pastor at the Immaculate Conception Church, was facing the altar when struck in the leg by a shot fired from a .22 rifle. The woman, Mrs. Hubert Samson, 40, was overpowered by two men who were among about 50 persons in the church at the time. Wound not serious said attendants at City Hospital, where the priest was taken, he lost a considerate amount of blood but the wound was not considered serious. Police said Mrs. Samson carried the rifle in a large bag and walked down the center aisle of the church, firing one shot after stepping into a pew near the altar. The woman, separated from her husband who lives in Frankenstein, Mo., gave the authorities a rambling account of grievances she held against priests of the parish, police said. Police Capt. John A Buck said Mrs. Samson told him she intended only to wound Father Schierhoff and not to kill him. She was taken to City Hospital for observation. Police said relatives of the woman said she had been a patient at the state mental hospital at Farmington, Mo., and also at the sanitarium near St. Louis. After the shooting, Monsignor James Johnston, pastor of the church, completed the mass and then asked persons in the church to pray for the wounded priest and for the woman.
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Old 08-16-2017, 07:14 AM
 
Location: Alamogordo, NM
7,940 posts, read 9,505,022 times
Reputation: 5695
^^^^ Notice that the descriptions of most of these burglars are that they were well dressed ?

Even when they sneak into someone's house while the owners are sleeping and steal a few nickels and dimes that belonged to children, they still take pride in their appearance.


Be afraid. Be very...afraid.
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