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Old 08-18-2017, 09:49 AM
 
Location: StlNoco Mo, where the woodbine twineth
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Quote:
Originally Posted by elkotronics View Post
Sullivan News July 13, 1911

Counterfeiter Dead

Recluse Found Dead In Meramec River

A.B. Small, fisherman, tie cutter, bachelor recluse, was found dead in shallow water, by his boat in the Meramec river last Thursday near the mouth of the Indian Creek, 6 miles south of St. Clair.
Small lived in a little log cabin, up a narrow valley, about a mile from the river. He was considered peculiar and a recluse, but did tie making and other chopping for those who needed work of that kind done, and earned his living in that way, it was supposed.
But search of his cabin by the coroner revealed considerable counterfeit money in dollars and half-dollar coins. A search later by the coroner and prosecuting attorney and a secret service man from St. Louis, discovered 7 plaster of paris dies for molding the coins.
The man's brother had been with him for some time but left only a few days before his death. How the counterfeit money was disposed of is not known as none was ever discovered being circulated in the community.
It seemed evident that the man had been shot by someone at considerable distance, for while most of the shot had taken effect in the left side in the region of the heart, some had struck his face and some as low down as the hip. No clue was at first known as to who did the shooting. Suspicion soon rested on one, John Heads, living in a cabin a few miles from the dead man's cabin. He had been heard to charge Small with being to attentive to his wife and was the only person known to be an enemy to Small.
He was arrested Sunday by Deputy Sheriff J.N. Cardwell of St. Clair, on a warrant charging him with murder and is now in jail at Union.
Small's custom was to go to the river every evening, cross in a boat and visit his mailbox on the other side. It is evident that he had been for his mail Wednesday evening, for when found, he had a letter in his pocket he had just received. He was shot on his return in the boat before landing and left in the shallow water, where the body fell. Robbery could not have been the object, as money he had in his pocket was not taken.
One feature in the case would indicate that it might be a case of accident. His own shotgun was found near him in the water, with an empty shell, and but for the scattered condition of the shot striking him, the accident theory would be very plausible.

Sounds like the murderer was John Heads in this one, though he may have had an accident with his own gun. Doubtful on that, because of the way the bullet spray went down.
Yeah, I think they got the right suspect, since he was Small's only enemy and he was the nearest person around Small.
Strange that someone would counterfeit half-dollar coins. But I guess it was easier to pass them back then compared to today, I mean, how often do you see a 50 cent piece ? Sure would look suspicious bringing in a pile to any of the banks or stores.
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Old 08-18-2017, 04:25 PM
 
Location: Alamogordo, NM
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Strange that someone would counterfeit half-dollar coins. But I guess it was easier to pass them back then compared to today, I mean, how often do you see a 50 cent piece ? Sure would look suspicious bringing in a pile to any of the banks or stores.

Oh man, it would look really weird to bring a pile of 'em in to a bank!
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Old 08-19-2017, 07:37 AM
 
Location: StlNoco Mo, where the woodbine twineth
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Jorts Wearing Bandit Hits St. Louis

Call the fashion cops: 'Jorts-wearing bandit' hits St. Louis





Burglar Robs Comic Book Shop But Leaves Cell Phone

Arrest made in comic book burglary after suspect leaves cellphone | FOX2now.com






The Sullivan News October 30, 1919

Held On Auto Charge

Dixon, Mo.,---Harley Schwartz, of this city, was arrested in St. Louis on charges of selling a mortgaged automobile and on attempting to pass a forged check. The police say the machine was sold to Roy Woods, and the forged check was given to the Davis Motor Sales Co.
The Dixon authorities have telegraphed the St. Louis police to hold Schwartz.
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Old 08-19-2017, 08:41 AM
 
Location: StlNoco Mo, where the woodbine twineth
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St. Louis Post-Dispatch February 22, 1955

Go Ahead And Shoot, I'm Not Afraid Of You


John S Bernal was shot and wounded fatally early today as he advanced toward two armed robbers at the Londoff Cocktail Lounge, 2357 Palm street, where he was a customer, telling them, "Go ahead and shoot, I'm not afraid of you." Bernal, 33 years old, of 2318 Sullivan avenue, died at City Hospital of a wound near the heart, 3 hours after he was shot. The shooting was witnessed by 20 other customers and employees of the cocktail lounge.
The robbers, who were masked and armed with revolvers, fled with $500 taken from the safe and cash register. Bernal's death was the second killing in a holdup in St. Louis in less than 24 hours. A criminal was tentatively identified as one of the robbers from a police photograph and the man is being sought.
The robbers, hatless and wearing dark overcoats, entered the dimly lighted basement cocktail lounge at 1 a.m. by a side entrance. Both had scarves covering portions of their faces. One man stood in the center of the room, covering customers and waitresses with his revolver. "This is a stickup, don't move," the robber warned. Harry Londoff, brother of Johnny Londoff, the owner, was behind the bar. The second robber ordered Londoff to empty the cash register, and hand him a bag of money from the safe behind the bar.
Londoff said the bag contained $350, and that he gave the robber $150 from the cash register.
Both robbers were backing toward the side entrance when Bernal, who had been sitting at the bar, slid off the stool and advanced toward the men.
One robber fired 3 shots, 2 went wild, smashing glasses and a glass panel in a case at the back of the bar. The third struck Bernal, who fell to his knees. As the robbers turned and dashed up the stairs, Bernal tried to get to his feet, then sprawled on the floor. He was unconscious when police arrived, and died without making a statement.

Former convicts Dale Berry and Richard J Crimmins were charged with the robbery and killing.
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Old 08-19-2017, 10:10 AM
 
Location: StlNoco Mo, where the woodbine twineth
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The Sullivan News March 12, 1942

Alleged Forger Arrested Here

Detective Sgt. John Feinn and two assistants from the St. Louis office arrived in Sullivan about 7:30 Tuesday morning to complete the roundup of a gang of check forgers by the arrest of a Mrs. Dickman. During the night previous, three men were arrested in Rolla and one woman in St. James. The men were placed in the Sullivan jail by Marshal Brake and the women were guarded in a car as there was no woman's quarters in the jail here, until taken into St. Louis Tuesday evening.
Mrs. Dickman, a divorcee, and a man, J.W. Ryan, she claimed to be her brother, have been living in the old Kramer house on Clark avenue since December.
Charges of some $10,000-$12,000 check forgeries on the small arms plant in St. Louis County have been issued against Ryan.
The checks have been cashed in 5 different states. When the home was searched Tuesday the detectives located all the necessary evidence but Ryan was not found. He has been driving a big 1942 Buick coupe which he sold in Cuba a few days ago. There are others in the gang to be rounded up. All are being held in St. Louis for questioning.
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Old 08-20-2017, 08:49 AM
 
Location: StlNoco Mo, where the woodbine twineth
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Sullivan Tri-County News July 7, 1955

Lee Reed Nabs Gas Thieves

Lee Reed, night watchman of Sullivan and a former resident of St. Clair, has solved a series of gasoline thefts which had stumped Sullivan police for some weeks. He arrested Harvey McCance, 18, of Pacific, William Jasper Bandy, 16, of Sullivan, Curtis Woodrow Paul, 16, of Sullivan, Woodrow and Danny King, brothers, whose ages are 18 and 15, of La Port, Colo., and formerly of Sullivan.
Last Sunday night Reed hid in an opportune spot in order to catch the young men in the act of theft and his strategy was successful.
About 2:30 a.m. he observed that gasoline taken from a Sullivan school bus was being channeled into a car owned by one of the offenders from a 10-gallon can. At the school bus there were a syphon hose, and a 5-gallon can which was overflowing. In the boy's car were two sections of garden hose cut into short lengths, and other tools of the gas theft trade.
McCance and Woodrow King, who are too old to be designated juvenile delinquents, were given 30-day suspended jail sentences Tuesday in Franklin County Magistrate Court. The three younger offenders were made wards of the juvenile court and released to their parents. The King boys were given permission to return at once to Colorado.
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Old 08-20-2017, 05:12 PM
 
Location: StlNoco Mo, where the woodbine twineth
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Sullivan Tri-County News February 5, 1959

Woman Stabbed To Death By Husband

Mrs. Lola Mae Weaver, aged 40, of Pacific, paid with her life early Tuesday for attempting to care for her husband, James C Weaver, who is insane. She was stabbed 68 times in the arms, hands, head, ear, neck, chest and lungs. In the heart there were 7 stab wounds, according to police sources. In the lungs there were multiple stabs. Weaver had been released Monday afternoon to his wife by Missouri State Hospital No.4 at Farmington on a convalescent parole.
Authorities knew that he was considered dangerous.
Hospitalization for his mental condition began last November. Driving with relatives to Indiana, he became violent after crossing the Missouri border and was taken as an emergency patient to the Illinois State Hospital for the mentally ill at Alton. He escaped from there December 4. After his capture by Sheriff H. Bill Miller, Franklin County, Mo., Weaver was placed in the hospital at Farmington. Hospital authorities released him Monday of this week.
The murder of his wife came to light late Tuesday afternoon when a woman, for whom Mrs. Weaver had done housework at Pacific, phoned the Weaver's home to ask why Mrs. Weaver had not come to work.
A man's voice answered, "Cause she's dead here in the house with me. She ain't gonna work for you no more."
The employer phoned the Pacific City Clerk, who relayed the message to Marshal Johnson. He went to the Weaver home. Weaver refused to permit Johnson to enter until Johnson removed his police pistol. Johnson complied, remembering that last December, Weaver had surrendered without trouble when authorities first disarmed. Weaver then admitted Johnson into the house but was not "in a talking mood."
Meantime Sheriff Miller awaited word from Johnson by police radio. When no word had come after 40 minutes, a posse was organized. Sheriff Miller and 4 policemen used tear gas at 7 pm to release Marshal Johnson and to capture Weaver. He surrendered without trouble and is now in the County Jail. An inquest is set for 8 am Thursday Feb. 5.
Weaver had stated calmly to police that early Tuesday he became angry because Mrs. Weaver wanted to go to a nearby store for cigarettes. He grabbed a knife and started stabbing.
They have no children. Mrs. Weaver's body is at Thiebes Funeral Home in Pacific.
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Old 08-21-2017, 08:28 AM
 
Location: StlNoco Mo, where the woodbine twineth
9,999 posts, read 8,458,510 times
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Sullivan Tri-County News June 8, 1961

2 Burglaries At Bourbon
Safe Broken At Farmers Co-op

An unidentified intruder broke into the Bourbon Farmers Exchange Friday night, jimmied the safe, and left with $361 in cash. Checks were left for the Farmers Co-op. Harrison Matthews is the manager. Marshal John Richardson states that the theft was discovered at 7:30 Saturday morning when Bill Wilhite came to work. The lock on the safe was destroyed. A laboratory technician of the Missouri Highway Patrol came Saturday from Jefferson City to take fingerprints and found only the prints of fabric. The safe burglar had worn gloves.
Someone broke into Kimberlin Oil Co. at Bourbon also Friday night and burglarized the business owned by James McIntosh. The latch on a cigarette vending machine was pried and the coin box was stolen with its contents. A key was used to open the soda dispenser and a minor amount of coins stolen. Marshal Richardson says he wouldn't doubt that both burglaries were committed by the same person. There are no clues.



St. Louis Post-Dispatch November 27, 1913


Negro Night Watchman Shoots Whistling Burglar With Double-Barreled Shotgun

St. Louis---Loo Horn, a negro watchman, shot Thomas McCune, a whistling burglar in the Army and Navy goods store at 415 North Broadway Wednesday night.
After firing both barrels of his shotgun at the burglar, the watchman loaded his weapon again and concealed himself in the back end of the store while he kept McCune in one of the front show windows covered with his gun. The watchman was so badly frightened that he refused to open the door when the police arrived. They had to break it open before they could capture the burglar.
McCune had climbed the outside fire escape to the top of the 4-story building and whistled as he went down the stairs to the first floor, and was whistling when he stepped into the front show window and gathered up an armload of razors, knives, mouth harps and other articles.
The watchman heard the whistling from his hiding place in the rear of the store. He waited until the burglar had gathered up an armload of goods and started to step into the main store room, then he fired both barrels of the shotgun. Seven shot penetrated the side of McCune's face, but the articles he was holding in his arms prevented any from hitting his body.
The watchman, so frightened, he told the police, that he would have dropped dead if the burglar had made a move. He reloaded and kept his gun on the burglar and ordered him not to move.
McCune, 19 years old, told police he was driven to burglary by hunger. He said he had been in St. Louis for two weeks. The watchman was employed after the store was robbed on Monday.



Sullivan News April 9, 1936

Thieves broke into the courthouse of Potosi last week and ransacked all the offices with the exception of that of the County Clerk. Nothing but cash was taken--to the extent of $120.
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Old 08-21-2017, 10:21 AM
 
Location: StlNoco Mo, where the woodbine twineth
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Sullivan News April 9, 1936

Mattox Drug Store Robbed Sunday Night

The Mattox drug store here was robbed of some money and merchandise Sunday night when an entrance was gained through one of the east windows in the store. According to a statement made by Mr. Mattox to Patrolman Henderson, all the change in the money drawers, including the mills, and about $50 in merchandise were missing.
The thief used the stairs on the east side of the building as a blind from the street, and climbed up to the high window. He evidently tried to pry the window open, as the sash is very much scarred, but when he failed he broke the pane and pried loose one end of one of the three iron bars that were nailed across the inside of the window. Several people reported having heard the noise and identified it as the shattering of an empty whiskey bottle or a car accident. No one took the trouble to investigate, but from these reports it is believed that the robbery occurred between 11:15 and 11:30.
Among the things that Mr. Mattox missed were cigarette cases, fountain pens, mechanical pencils and compacts. He did not miss the penny slot machine until someone found it down near the stock yards and brought it back.




Sullivan Tri-County News April 3, 1958

Boys Steal Car To Put Punch In Vacation

St. Louis schools are closed this week for Easter vacation, and the lull in time proved too much for two 15-year-old boys whose solution to the problem landed them with the juvenile authority.
Stating that they had "nothing else to do," they stole a late model car at Ladue Tuesday morning. Driving west, they were stopped by Missouri Highway Troopers, A.J. Boschert and Don Rodgers near the southwest garage of Gray Summit on the highway. They were released to the juvenile authority in St. Louis County.
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Old 08-21-2017, 09:11 PM
 
Location: StlNoco Mo, where the woodbine twineth
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Peter Licavoli (1902-1984) b. St. Louis, Missouri and his brother Thomas Licavoli (1904-1973) b. St. Louis, Missouri, were described as two of the most vicious gang leaders of their day. They started their activities in St. Louis and moved up to Detroit where they took over the Purple Gang and eventually settled in Ohio.

https://www.upi.com/Archives/1984/01...3319442645200/




James Licavoli, ruthless Cleveland Mob chief, born August 18 in 1904 | The Mob Museum



Licavoli Mob | Mafia Wiki | FANDOM powered by Wikia



https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/James_T._Licavoli



https://www.findagrave.com/cgi-bin/f...r&GRid=7536730




JAMES T. LICAVOLI, CRIME LEADER IN CLEVELAND - NYTimes.com
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