U.S. CitiesCity-Data Forum Index
Covid-19 Information Page
Go Back   City-Data Forum > U.S. Forums > Missouri
 [Register]
Please register to participate in our discussions with 2 million other members - it's free and quick! Some forums can only be seen by registered members. After you create your account, you'll be able to customize options and access all our 15,000 new posts/day with fewer ads.
View detailed profile (Advanced) or search
site with Google Custom Search

Search Forums  (Advanced)
Reply Start New Thread
 
Old 02-25-2006, 10:52 PM
 
Location: Southwestern Arizona
4 posts, read 29,923 times
Reputation: 32

Advertisements

I have some land in Gravois Mills Mo. that has several acres of Ceramonial Grounds of the Osage Indians. It has been protected by the government for almost a century. It has always been a mystery to me as to the ceramonys that may have been preformed there. I still have a great deal I should learn of the Indiginious people that once lived and still do live in the area. If anyone can connect me with someone that can tell me more of the land I love so much it would mean a great deal to me....Thanks Roam-n-Red
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message

 
Old 05-17-2006, 11:00 PM
 
1 posts, read 6,059 times
Reputation: 13
hello, Ithink that most were moved to a res. in olk. see I also own some land on the osage reservation but also there were cherokee moved to that reservation, my blood comes from Busheyhead and he was the origional owner of the land i own. I will try to look up some history for you however i do know there are some osage still there where you are i am from that area.

I forgot to tell you there is a real good movie you aut to see called fish hawk you will love it, about the last remaining osage man in the area and he moved. it isnt a historical just a good flick.

Last edited by Marka; 05-18-2006 at 12:09 AM.. Reason: merged
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
 
Old 07-21-2006, 08:47 AM
 
Location: S.E.of the Kansas City area
19 posts, read 102,516 times
Reputation: 29
Camden Co., MO. Community History:
Several hundred years ago, the Osage Indians roamed the hills and valleys of what is now Missouri's Miller, Camden and Morgan Counties, which surround the Lake of the Ozarks - the northern foothills of the Ozark Mountains. Tribes of Osage Indians pushed patiently through the trees hunting deer, turkey and other wildlife. By the streams, they fished and captured beavers. Caves abound in the Ozarks, and offered temporary shelter to the Osage Indians. The Ozarks is also abundant in sinkholes, underground streams, large springs and natural bridges. Just beyond and between the hills and rocky cliffs, there are plateaus where prairie grass grew and where the Indians planted their crops of corn, beans and pumpkins.. Farmers in this three-county area continue to turn up arrowheads as they till their fields ... a constant reminder of the land's predecessors.

The white man moved from the Mississippi onto the Missouri River, then through the tributaries of the Osage and Niangua Rivers - to this beautiful, lush land. Possibly the earliest meeting of the Osage and explorers was in 1710, when a Frenchman named Claude DuTissent visited and hunted with the Osage tribes. But it wasn't until a century later that the natural wonders of the Ozarks were described by Lewis and Clark as they explored the frontier.

Gradually, commerce began between the traders from St. Louis and the Indians. The Osage bartered beaver and other animal skins, which found their way to the eastern colonies of the United States and Europe. As the traders moved into the area, the Osage ceded parcels of land to the federal government which eventually took a familiar action. In 1825, the Osage tribe was moved to reservations in Kansas and Oklahoma.

The Ozarks then became wide open for settlers who came primarily from Kentucky, Tennessee and Virginia. Among them were hunters, such as Daniel Boone, who made a livelihood of trapping animals for their skins. However, most of the newcomers were farmers who built their log homes and churches and tilled their fields with oxen and mules. They grew crops of hay, soybeans and corn, and raised cattle and pigs to meet their needs of self-sufficiency.

Life in the Ozarks wasn't all work. The pioneers also met their need for social interaction by gathering as small communities, enjoying box suppers and music played for square, round and clog dancing. These are activities which have been passed on through generations.

You might check out the Official Website of the Osage Nation at:
www.osagetribe.com, www.nativeamericans.com, or the Camden County Library District at www.ccld.us/services/reference/specialcollection.htm (broken link). This should give you a good start if you have not already found these sites.

Happy searching
MissouriLady
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
 
Old 12-04-2006, 03:56 PM
 
Location: Southwestern Arizona
4 posts, read 29,923 times
Reputation: 32
Wow you all have been very helpfull in providing information of the Osage people. Thank you so much. I am far from there in Southern Arizona right now but your words have brought me so much closer to the beautiful place I have in Gravois Mills. I plan on retireing to my little place there and work the land myself someday. I am sad to hear that the Osage people have had to move away to the reservations. It is like that everywhere. I have also contacted the Osage web site and I will look at the Library site as well. Thank you much Roam-n-Red
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
 
Old 01-16-2010, 11:27 AM
 
3 posts, read 15,179 times
Reputation: 12
roam-n-red do you know any thing about Gravois Beach Resort from the 50s&60s or what the name of the place is now.thanks 1950s Kid
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
 
Old 05-25-2010, 09:51 AM
 
Location: Missouri
1 posts, read 4,624 times
Reputation: 11
Default Osage Trail Trees In Gravois Mills Mo

Red

On our way to the Lake of the Ozarks we pass through Gravois Mills to reach our cabin.

Throughout the Ozark area we have located many Indian Trail Trees, have you had the opportunity to see these bent trees on your property?

Several years ago several of us tree enthusiasts met with the Mountain Stewards of Georgia at Hobbs State Park, Ark. Since that meeting much attention has been brought to preserving these trees.

I would someday love to see the ceremonial grounds located in Gravois Mills. Please go to the website to learn what the Stewards are doing.

Mountain Stewards

They are taching others how to locate these trees by using old survey maps and extracting trails data.

Google CMT Culturally Modified Trees and the name, Celinda Kaelin.

Hap
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
 
Old 05-28-2010, 07:27 AM
 
11,699 posts, read 11,056,700 times
Reputation: 4599
We were told in school that the Cherokees hated the Osage and picked on the constantly and called them lazy Possum eaters.
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
 
Old 02-09-2011, 07:17 PM
 
1 posts, read 3,955 times
Reputation: 16
Smile Gravois Beach Resort

Quote:
Originally Posted by 1950s kid View Post
roam-n-red do you know any thing about Gravois Beach Resort from the 50s&60s or what the name of the place is now.thanks 1950s Kid

My grandparents started Gravois Beach Resort before the dam was completed. I have many years of memories of spending summers there in the 50s & 60s
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
 
Old 07-15-2012, 01:11 PM
 
1 posts, read 3,110 times
Reputation: 10
Some of my family (which included my Osage great-grandmother) settled in a place called Packard, Missouri (named for my great-grandfather Delos Packard Thurber). All I can find out so far about Packard, MO is that it was in Hickory County and had a post office around the turn of the 20th century. I've heard that the town is now
"under a lake" (manmade). Has anyone heard of it? Does it have anything to do with Gravois Mills? Thanks, TC
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
 
Old 07-20-2012, 04:05 PM
 
1,472 posts, read 2,081,070 times
Reputation: 1153
Quote:
Originally Posted by tinacastanares View Post
Some of my family (which included my Osage great-grandmother) settled in a place called Packard, Missouri (named for my great-grandfather Delos Packard Thurber). All I can find out so far about Packard, MO is that it was in Hickory County and had a post office around the turn of the 20th century. I've heard that the town is now
"under a lake" (manmade). Has anyone heard of it? Does it have anything to do with Gravois Mills? Thanks, TC
It would be under Truman Lake.I'm wondering if OP doesn't have Burial Mound on their property.There is several around I know of.

brushrunner
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
Please register to post and access all features of our very popular forum. It is free and quick. Over $68,000 in prizes has already been given out to active posters on our forum. Additional giveaways are planned.

Detailed information about all U.S. cities, counties, and zip codes on our site: City-data.com.


Reply
Please update this thread with any new information or opinions. This open thread is still read by thousands of people, so we encourage all additional points of view.

Quick Reply
Message:


Settings
X
Data:
Loading data...
Based on 2000-2020 data
Loading data...

123
Hide US histogram

Over $104,000 in prizes was already given out to active posters on our forum and additional giveaways are planned!

Go Back   City-Data Forum > U.S. Forums > Missouri
Similar Threads
Follow City-Data.com founder on our Forum or

All times are GMT -6. The time now is 03:14 PM.

© 2005-2020, Advameg, Inc. · Please obey Forum Rules · Terms of Use and Privacy Policy · Bug Bounty

City-Data.com - Contact Us - Archive 1, 2, 3, 4, 5, 6, 7, 8, 9, 10, 11, 12, 13, 14, 15, 16, 17, 18, 19, 20, 21, 22, 23, 24, 25, 26, 27, 28, 29, 30, 31, 32, 33, 34, 35, 36, 37 - Top