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Old 02-17-2007, 12:31 PM
 
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roundup is a nice small town,decent scenery at the edge of the bull mountains,and pretty close to billings without being too close.realestate is also fairly cheap as things go nowadays,especially being within commuting distance of billings
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Old 02-27-2007, 09:53 AM
 
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Default Roundup

We just bought land in Roundup and we love it. We havent moved yet but hope to by this summer. We are in our 30's with children and Roundup had everything we needed. Quaint small town, friendly, 2 grocery stores (good size stores too) good smaller schools, we ate at 3 diners and they were all good. We did see alot of retired people so you would have friends if you want. It is a very diverse terrain. If you look in the Bull Mts you can have Mountain style living like Western Montana (kinda) Where we bought is 12 miles West of Roundup and about an hour from Billings which has everything any big city has. The one thing Roundup doesnt have (that we loved) is commercial, franchise stores. No Walmart-yea!!! It really has a feel of an old, slower paced, community. By the way, we are moving from Alabama and we spend just a week to fly out and secure our property and we already feel homesick for Montana. Another note--we looked all over Montana, border to border and finally narrowed it down to Central Montana and we really liked everywhere we went. Lewistown is a very nice town too. Little more expensive but if you only want a fixer upper maybe a great choice. Good Luck and dont let anyone discourage you. We are just taking a leap of faith to go before we retire to give our kids a better place to grow up in.
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Old 02-27-2007, 04:39 PM
 
Location: Great Falls, Montana
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>>> ...we looked all over Montana, border to border and finally narrowed it down to Central Montana... <<<

GoinWest,

Most who come here these days are making the same great choice you did.... You just can't beat Central Montana.

Anyhow.......

It's about time you got here......

Welcome Home
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Old 03-09-2007, 03:56 PM
 
62 posts, read 460,933 times
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Default Montana, forgive me !!!

Quote:
Originally Posted by goinwest View Post
If you look in the Bull Mts you can have Mountain style living like Western Montana (kinda) Where we bought is 12 miles West of Roundup and about an hour from Billings .
Be careful of the Bull Mountains. I would stay close to Hwy 12. If you go deeper into the Bulls, it is made up of Ponderosa Pine. My brother nicknamed it the tree that talks to fire. It has a very heavy kerosene content and will go up in a second.

There are many newbees that live in the Bulls, especially South of Hwy 12 and West/East of Hwy 87. It is a dry area. It is beautiful with sandstone outcroppings and Ponderosa pine. About everything that exits into the Bulls from Hwy 87 are dense 20-40 acre tracts with very small dirt roads. Before a fire starts there make sure you have two ways in to your property and two ways out. Have an alternate route out. Because of the new people, hence not used to the dry conditions, I would worry about someone leaving a charcoal BBQ outside in the wind. One spark in that area is devastating.

The Bulls can be a very attractive area. There are only a few locals who live there and they have ranches...most of the rest are relocators from other states. The realtors are able to sell them property there because it is so gorgeous.

There was a fire south of Roundtown in I believe late 80's(?) can't really remember. Anyway, it went through the Majerus ranch and burnt the ground so bad parts are still sterile. There is a huge coal mine on the East side of Hwy 87 south of Roundup. So buying anything on the East side, which did have water, is out. People are selling like mad over there. The coal mine will blow dust everywhere. Its sad because it is a gorgeous area. Just telling the truth.

Last fall there was a careless person who must have been traveling down the highway and threw out a cigarette butt. It started a fire just north of Majerus', South of Roundup, West of 87. The thing went up quickly. This fire however, was tackled much quicker and with more support than I have ever seen up there. Rumor was that it was close to the coal mine and that's why they worked so hard. I thought because so many more people live up there now that they were protecting them....who knows?

If you are going to live right in town, Roundup isn't bad, but it is very old housing. It has everything one would need...I don't know why it is such a depressed area. Again, maybe because it isn't near the Interstate the drive-by people don't see it. The rodeo is great. The Mussellshell River goes through there. It has a small hospital with a PA. It has a old folks home. It has a great inexpensive 9 hole golf course.

Now the other blogger mentioned Lewistown which is further north above the Snowies and off the highway (87) to the West. Lewistown isn't too bad. It is not far from the Missouri breaks if you elk hunt. If you really don't need to live in a city and don't need outside entertainment Grass Range has a couple of properties not too expensive.

Does your husband like to fish? Do you like to walk in the National Forests? Are you a birder? There are a lot of people moving in that think Montana is a great place for these 4-wheeler things rather than good ole horseback. Be very careful. Over by Whitehall, Jefferson Valley, which is about 20 miles East of Butte, used to be a very beautiful place. Again a lot of out of staters are building there. They have turned LookOut Pass into a 4-wheel convention. Also people from Bozeman, Gallatin Valley, are moving there because Bozeman has become so expensive.

Do you boat? A small town that is just beginning to be discovered by out of staters is Townsend. It is south east of Helena (for medical) and north of Three Forks (Interstate 90). There is a large reservoir called Canyon Ferry there. It is less expensive than up around Flathead/Kalispell area if you need a large body of water for boating. I have noticed though since just last year home prices have risen.

The only reason it is still available is it isn't near an Interstate and the people "passing through" Montana haven't seen it. It has a bowling alley, restaraunts, bank, police and the normal few bars. Just east of there is National Forest through the Deep Creek Canyon so there is dedicated land to walk around. Further east along Hwy 12 is White Sulphur Springs. WSS is a nice place, a little clicky...has necessities. Again off the beaten path of Interstates so is affordable. If you want to live on the outskirts there is a retired doc who is selling small parcels of land with CC&R's, not too restrictive, and he's just north of the golf course.

Lincoln is a beautiful town on Hwy200. Its north of Helena....again off the beaten path so not as many out of staters know of it. Yes, the unibomber was from there but he was up StemplePass road. Try and stay away from Wolf Creek area. That is a gasoline can ready to explode. Again gorgeous area, but too spooky for me to sleep at night.

Cascade, Great Falls, Choteau are windy areas. Well, actually most of Montana is windy unless you are in the trees. Anything on the front range will be windy. First ever wind farm in Montana was just built near Judith Gap last year. If you are retiring you may be too old to start a windbreak. What's left and inexpensive is what is left. Most of the property around beautiful Swan, Seeley, Big Fork area has been gobbled up by you guessed it....those that sold their home at a huge profit in CA, OR, WA and moved to Montana.

You could always wait until the market goes to heck and the people that "summer in Montana" sell their 2nd or 3rd homes here. Or we could, God willing, have a real Montana winter and scare the begeezers out of some of those whom have escaped to Montana....Back in the early 80's one could have had a hayday with available properties after the winter of 78.

It really depends on what your hobbies are....Let me know...I spend a great amount of time researching real estate for a brother that wants to move back. I am not a realtor....land just interests me. Otherwise, Plains is still available, but I hate to even blog that....it is a beautiful valley and not quite discovered by those with bucks.
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Old 03-10-2007, 08:18 AM
 
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Thank you NativeMontanan!
I was hoping someone would tell me in detail about some of the area's! We have lived in the mountains all our life and know about the danger of fire.
Right now we live in heavy wooded area 5 miles from the main road and have 3 ways to get out. I drive 17 miles to get to town and like the inconvience.
We are hoping to find an older home outside of town, I have never had neighbors close by but probably wouldn't mind. We don't mind the snow so that isn't a concern. We don't want to live in a city, and don't like outside entertainment and hate shopping. I need tree's and rivers. My husband likes to fish, I like to walk-and saddle up for a nice ride. We do most everything together so while he is fishing I am reading, while I am walking/riding he is tinkering outside (splitting wood, or working in the garden etc.)
We don't boat, and I don't like the wind so those windy area's you mention are not for me. The plains will not work for me at all -gotta have the security of mountain life. I guess you can say our hobbies are a simple quite life enjoying each other, our family (we have 6 children) and a small community. We are always willing to give a helping hand so a strong community where people care about one another is very important. And yes I am a rodeo junkie -will travel for a good rodeo
I appreciate you taking the time to help us find a place that we could afford, we have 5 years before we retire -and will still be young enough (50) to still enjoy the things we love.
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Old 03-20-2007, 10:53 PM
 
Location: Brendansport, Sagitta IV
7,912 posts, read 13,760,585 times
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I grew up in MT and am looking to move back north... so I was checking real estate and good gods, around WSS, anything with acreage was as high as Bozeman! WTF?!
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Old 03-23-2007, 01:38 PM
 
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Quote:
Originally Posted by NativeMontanan View Post
Try and stay away from Wolf Creek area. That is a gasoline can ready to explode. Again gorgeous area, but too spooky for me to sleep at night.
Can you expand upon this thought? Why is it ready to explode, and what's spooky about it? It's one of the places I want to explore when I come visit.

Thanks,
~W
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Old 03-23-2007, 02:13 PM
 
Location: Brendansport, Sagitta IV
7,912 posts, read 13,760,585 times
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After several years of drought, any forested area becomes a tinderbox, most especially if it's not being selectively logged. We've had 10 years of mostly-drought in the west. And there's a lot of "protected" forest around Wolf Creek.

When there's not enough water to support the whole tree population, it's important that the weaker ones be thinned out so the remaining trees can survive; otherwise they'll ALL die, or at the very least will all be stressed to the point where most have dead or dying branches (which of course are much more flammable than green wood). So logging is a critical part of forest management in dry years, and a blanket prohibition on logging actually ENCOURAGES both tree death and forest fires that will quickly burn out of control.

This is what recently happened in SoCal's national scrubbrush, er, forests -- 4 out of 5 trees died due to the combination of drought and a logging moratorium. And when there was a fire (and in any wildfire area, that's WHEN, not IF), there was this huge supply of standing deadwood, and NOTHING spreads a fire faster.

This is why much as I love trees, and much as it pains me to see any tree cut down, I'm all for selective logging -- in drought years, it helps keep the rest of the forest healthy, and reduces the risk of forest fires that will burn far beyond what nature would normally do for herself. (The occasional fire is good and useful for "recycling" a forest that's in its dotage, and helping certain plants reseed. Some pine species *need* fire to open their cones so seeds can sprout.)

If you're caught behind a forest fire that's jumping along standing deadwood, your chance of getting out alive is slim to nil. The problem isn't getting cooked, it's that the heat gets so intense that the resulting violent updraft takes all the air with it, and you suffocate. I remember some years back that several firefighters got killed that way during one of the Bob Marshall Wilderness' annual weiner roasts. They often find deer laying dead after fires, without a singed hair on 'em, because of this phenomenon.

And when aided by wind (natural or what it generates for itself) a fire can move faster than you'd believe possible. Some years ago we clocked a brush fire along the highway here, and it travelled 3 miles in 3 minutes flat. That's 60 MILES PER HOUR. You may not have TIME to get out.

Me, I'm glad I prefer plains and wheatfields to forests and mountains.
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Old 03-23-2007, 02:26 PM
 
Location: Brendansport, Sagitta IV
7,912 posts, read 13,760,585 times
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Main drawback with Lewistown is that the roads thru there bloody suck in winter. Nice little town otherwise, real pretty, and Great Falls isn't such a bad drive if you need real shopping. If you're into herding dogs, there are a lot of stockdog trials in the area.

I've only been to Roundup a few times (had a feed store that was worth the drive from Bozeman!), but it struck me as the quintessential cowboy town -- dusty streets and no reason to be in a rush; where you're goin' to ain't gonna git up and run off.

Which reminds me... back in the early 60s, first time I ever went thru Jordan, I remember that the highway was paved to the edge of town, was dirt through town, then the pavement picked up again on the other side. Guess no one wanted to raise taxes to pave main street.
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Old 04-18-2007, 12:40 PM
 
2 posts, read 6,948 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by dcconey View Post
Can anyone tell me anything about Roundup - Saco ?
We jokingly call Saco "the mosquito capital" because of it's very abundant and very large mosquitoes. Had to haul horses through there one night and it sounded like someone throwing handfuls of gravel at the windshield, which turned out to be the mighty mosquitoes. Not much in Saco or surrounding areas.

Roundup is beautiful with it's rocky outcroppings, pine and sagebrush but am told that the "undesireables" from Billings are moving in. They are given a "one way ticket" to Roundup after being released from jail in Billings - a lot with drug problems. Not trying to deter you from Roundup, just want you to be aware of this growing situation there.

We live in Lewistown and it is very lovely here. We are in a "snow bowl" here. We often get dumped on but travel 20-30 miles away and there won't be a single flake of snow. But it keeps this area green during this time of drought. People are friendly and the town is working hard at improving downtown and are putting in many walking trails in the area.

Unfortunately, we are moving. I hate leaving our wonderful two acres on Big Spring Creek but the taxes are eating us up. It will be hard leaving our little piece of paradise, but we have to do what we have to do.
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