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Old 12-08-2015, 07:44 PM
 
Location: Minneapolis, MN
8,634 posts, read 13,922,756 times
Reputation: 4378

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Quote:
Originally Posted by Yankees1212 View Post
I didn't even think about buying a bike with ABS, but that's a good suggestion and definitely something to think about. I'm just wondering if a 300cc has enough power for a lot of highway riding?
My personal opinion is that a Ninja 300 would suffice. There are a lot of experienced riders who will stick with the 300 as a commuter bike because they get great fuel economy and are extremely agile for getting around traffic in town. This isn't to say the Ninja 650 isn't a nice bike, because it is. However, for a beginner bike your priority should be ease of use as opposed to power. I'll give you an example of why I think the 300 is a better choice for starting out, it's more manageable size. This is one of the biggest differences between the bikes. The Ninja 650 has a curb weight of like 465lbs compared to 384 lbs for the 300. This means that if you are at a stop and don't pay attention for a second and lean the bike to its side (common mistake for squids) you'll be putting 80lbs less on your leg when you catch it and pull it back into place. The same weight reduction can be applied to moving the bike around your garage and makes it flickable in turns and general manuevering. The old Ninja 250 was a highway capable bike and the newer 300 adds a nice bump in midrange power, plus fuel injection. It also has a slipper clutch which is a really nice feature for beginning riders. If your choice is between the two Ninjas I think the 300 is a better choice. And as I said before, adding ABS is worth the extra $500 or whatever it costs.
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Old 12-08-2015, 08:00 PM
 
Location: NJ
802 posts, read 1,482,756 times
Reputation: 726
Quote:
Originally Posted by Cruz Azul Guy View Post
My personal opinion is that a Ninja 300 would suffice. There are a lot of experienced riders who will stick with the 300 as a commuter bike because they get great fuel economy and are extremely agile for getting around traffic in town. This isn't to say the Ninja 650 isn't a nice bike, because it is. However, for a beginner bike your priority should be ease of use as opposed to power. I'll give you an example of why I think the 300 is a better choice for starting out, it's more manageable size. This is one of the biggest differences between the bikes. The Ninja 650 has a curb weight of like 465lbs compared to 384 lbs for the 300. This means that if you are at a stop and don't pay attention for a second and lean the bike to its side (common mistake for squids) you'll be putting 80lbs less on your leg when you catch it and pull it back into place. The same weight reduction can be applied to moving the bike around your garage and makes it flickable in turns and general manuevering. The old Ninja 250 was a highway capable bike and the newer 300 adds a nice bump in midrange power, plus fuel injection. It also has a slipper clutch which is a really nice feature for beginning riders. If your choice is between the two Ninjas I think the 300 is a better choice. And as I said before, adding ABS is worth the extra $500 or whatever it costs.
Thanks so much for this advice!
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Old 12-08-2015, 08:01 PM
 
Location: NJ
802 posts, read 1,482,756 times
Reputation: 726
Quote:
Originally Posted by PDD View Post
Don't listen to your mother she is not as smart as you are when it comes to motorcycles. That's what I did when I was 23 back in 1966. We didn't even have to wear a helmet back then.
Had my head on collision when the oncoming driver did not see me and turned right in front of me. I was lucky only had a broken leg and missed six weeks of work.
BTW that was when NJ had 1/2 the cars on the road as it does today.

I say go for it, you only live once. Do you have any brothers or sisters just in case? Don't want to leave your mom childless.
Honestly, can't tell if you are being sarcastic with this post lol
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Old 12-08-2015, 08:47 PM
 
11,722 posts, read 6,512,889 times
Reputation: 12628
Yeah...a friend of my mom's was decapitated on a motorcycle. Knew I wasn't going to be getting on one without seriously upsetting her.

Maybe start with a dirt bike or stick to track experiences and avoid riding with the general public.
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Old 12-08-2015, 08:55 PM
 
Location: NJ
802 posts, read 1,482,756 times
Reputation: 726
I think a lot of people who get into riding a motorcycle have the personality where they like to take risks. Therefore, a lot of people riding don't take the necessary precautions to avoid a bad collision. I've watched a bunch of youtube videos on safety and have seen testaments from people who have ridden for thousands of miles and for decades without an incident. One of the biggest pieces of advice is to NOT accelerate through an intersection. A lot of bikers do this for an unknown reason. Anyway, if I emulate the good riders and not the ones who don't ride defensively, I think I'll be fine.

Please, let's stick to the topic at hand-> how to dispel doubt for my mom and a good starter bike so I'm able to be as comfortable as possible!
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Old 12-09-2015, 06:29 AM
 
Location: Western North Carolina
1,296 posts, read 928,151 times
Reputation: 2010
Been riding since I was a zygote. I'd suggest you start looking at the used market first, find a good running daily commuter leaning towards the dual sport side of life. Dual sports are much lighter than street bikes and are a lot easier to flick around and learn how and why bikes do what they do. Also, when you drop it, they're easier to pick up and the scratches give them character. Most can handle the highways just fine, in 1968 I rode a Yamaha DT-1 (a 250 2 stroke) back and forth multiple times from Bergen County, New Jersey to college in Boston. It wasn't pleasant but certainly do-able. Street bikes are fine too, but a bit heavier and although very good at handling higher speeds on the highway, they're a bit more cumbersome when in city or in-town traffic or in a good set of twisties.

Rather than concerning yourself at this point with what the bike can do, concentrate on learning what you can do with the bike, i.e. learning to ride it and then control it. After your comfortable with what you can do, then it's time to start looking at the new bikes. And don't worry about what other people say or think, it's your life. Enjoy it.
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Old 12-09-2015, 05:21 PM
 
Location: California
11,451 posts, read 17,912,669 times
Reputation: 12626
I've been riding for 42 years on the street, don't pass up doing something you want, keep it low keyed around your mother, mothers worry. Start small and work up, 300cc is big enough to take you anywhere just be safe. Have a good time.
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Old 12-09-2015, 10:46 PM
 
Location: NJ
802 posts, read 1,482,756 times
Reputation: 726
Ok, so it definitely seems the consensus is 300 so that's what I'm going to look for in the new few months to purchase. The Ninja 300 has ABS so I'm going to keep an eye on that. I've heard the bike is a lot of fun to ride and great for beginners. Looking forward to it
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Old 12-10-2015, 07:05 AM
PDD
 
Location: The Sand Hills of NC
8,774 posts, read 16,100,131 times
Reputation: 11934
Quote:
Originally Posted by Yankees1212 View Post
Honestly, can't tell if you are being sarcastic with this post lol
I just told you what I did when I was young and stupid. You do what you want to do.
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Old 12-10-2015, 07:21 AM
 
Location: Colorado Springs
6,079 posts, read 6,397,397 times
Reputation: 21059
Everyone I know who rides a motorcycle has been in at least one wreck. There is no exception.

Most of them then got rid of the motorcycle.
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