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Old 12-10-2015, 08:09 AM
 
Location: Western North Carolina
1,296 posts, read 927,434 times
Reputation: 2010

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Quote:
Originally Posted by Vision67 View Post
Everyone I know who rides a motorcycle has been in at least one wreck. There is no exception.

Most of them then got rid of the motorcycle.

I've been in several but all of them were on the race track. Never been in one on the street. Track days can really teach you to extend your spidey senses! Still have two bikes to play with but when the time comes to hang it up (which will be soon at my age) it will be because I know I can't do it safely any more.
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Old 12-10-2015, 08:11 AM
 
Location: Western North Carolina
1,296 posts, read 927,434 times
Reputation: 2010
Quote:
Originally Posted by Yankees1212 View Post
Ok, so it definitely seems the consensus is 300 so that's what I'm going to look for in the new few months to purchase. The Ninja 300 has ABS so I'm going to keep an eye on that. I've heard the bike is a lot of fun to ride and great for beginners. Looking forward to it

To the OP, I'd suggest this site - Sport-Touring.Net - join up and check out the Beginners Garage forum. Lots of good info and good friends on that site. Best of luck!
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Old 12-10-2015, 10:50 AM
 
Location: Southern Oregon
2,976 posts, read 4,479,520 times
Reputation: 3261
Quote:
Originally Posted by Yankees1212 View Post
I think a lot of people who get into riding a motorcycle have the personality where they like to take risks. Therefore, a lot of people riding don't take the necessary precautions to avoid a bad collision. I've watched a bunch of youtube videos on safety and have seen testaments from people who have ridden for thousands of miles and for decades without an incident. One of the biggest pieces of advice is to NOT accelerate through an intersection. A lot of bikers do this for an unknown reason. Anyway, if I emulate the good riders and not the ones who don't ride defensively, I think I'll be fine.

Please, let's stick to the topic at hand-> how to dispel doubt for my mom and a good starter bike so I'm able to be as comfortable as possible!
Get the bike you are comfortable on, there is nothing worse than ride a bike that doesn't fit you. One thing to remember, all bikes are different, the way they handle and the little quirks that is unique to each bike.
As far as mom goes, the longer you have have the bike the more accepting she will become. Another thing, watching videos of riding isn't the same as riding. I've been riding motorcycles for 40 years and every time you get on your bike and head down the road it's a new experience. Intersections are the most dangerous parts of the road, people just don't see motorcycles. You will learn in your MS course that "target fixation" is a killer and the techniques on how to avoid it.

Get the bike that is going to fit your riding needs, if you are wanting to travel distances I'd stay away from the smaller crotch rockets, if it is just a commuter bike then anythings is good to go.

Best of luck to you,
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Old 12-10-2015, 12:50 PM
 
Location: Poway, CA
2,698 posts, read 10,708,324 times
Reputation: 2238
Buy the bike, cut the cord, live your life.

Many many threads on here about ideal first bikes. I've commented in quite a few, so I won't repeat myself here except to say that how the bike fits YOU is the most crucial. And I'm not talking 'fit' as in personality, I mean actual physical fit. Go sit on a bunch and see what feels right. You might be too big/tall for 250/300s or too short for some others. The more comfortable you are on the bike, the better you'll be able to learn how to ride/control it. But yes, I do recommend not starting with sport/super-sport bikes (600cc, liter, etc). There are SO MANY fantastic 'entry level' bikes out there; one will certainly suit your and fit you. And if you ever feel like you're 'outgrowing' the bike, take it to a track, get spanked by a guy on a 300, and realize you're not even close, lol!

Mike
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Old 12-10-2015, 02:22 PM
 
Location: By the sea, by the sea, by the beautiful sea
64,634 posts, read 45,904,390 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Vision67 View Post
Motorcycles, oh boy.

My wife worked as an RN in the ER of the local hospital for 10 years. During that time I heard so many stories about bike wrecks that I decided that the risk far exceeds the rewards.
How many of those riders were well trained, wearing the right gear, and sober/straight?

How many car wreck victims did she see? Would it make you stop driving?

Quote:
Originally Posted by Vision67 View Post
The classic accident is the guy in the pickup who does a left turn in front of the bike and you T-bone the truck.
A good rider approaches every other vehicle as if there's someone inside who will attempt to kill him and plans/acts accordingly.

Quote:
Originally Posted by Vision67 View Post
In a car, you have structure and airbags to reduce injury. In a motorcycle you have none of the above.
A good rider can out brake and outmaneuver just about any car on the road.
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Old 12-10-2015, 02:44 PM
 
3,463 posts, read 4,932,307 times
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I feel much safer on a bike than a car. Accident avoidance comfort is soooo much higher. Im just more comfortable on a bike. I've fallen three times on the road. No fun at all, but it was just because I disregarded rule #1 of riding, which is never let you mind wander. Oh yeah, rule #2, too--Dont do stoopid stuff-- Since I started on dirt bikes i nthe 70's and compete in dual sport events, falling wasn't as much of a big deal to me as it might have been to someone else. I spend quite a bit of time beating the dirt with my face in those events--lol
No big deal . . .
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Old 12-10-2015, 03:05 PM
PDD
 
Location: The Sand Hills of NC
8,774 posts, read 16,093,580 times
Reputation: 11934
Quote:
Originally Posted by burdell View Post
How many of those riders were well trained, wearing the right gear, and sober/straight?

How many car wreck victims did she see? Would it make you stop driving?



A good rider approaches every other vehicle as if there's someone inside who will attempt to kill him and plans/acts accordingly.



A good rider can out brake and outmaneuver just about any car on the road.
The only thing that keeps any rider from being hit by a car/truck driver who is not paying attention is just dumb luck.

When a car is coming at you from the opposite direction and turns into your path with no warning there is absolutely nothing that will save you from a collision.

The only way you find this out is when it happens to you. If it never happens to you it isn't because of your skill it's because of dumb luck.

BTW thousands of expert riders get killed every year because they run out of luck.
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Old 12-10-2015, 03:10 PM
 
35,104 posts, read 44,287,600 times
Reputation: 62297
Quote:
Originally Posted by Yankees1212 View Post
Hey guys,

I'm about to turn 22 in a week and I'm graduating from college next semester. I want to buy a bike during the spring as I have the whole summer off before I start my full-time job in the fall. I have never ridden a motorcycle before, but I plan to purchase it completely on my own and take care of all the expenses. Still, my mom is reluctant and constantly tells me how unsafe it is to ride. I have told her I plan to take the MSF course and will ride responsibly, but she doesn't seem to listen. What are your thoughts on this? It hurts me that she is going to worry, but I'm an adult and should be able to make these decisions. I live in New Jersey by the way.

Second question, would you guys recommend a 300cc or a 650cc as my first motorcycle? I was originally going to get a Ninja 300, but people have told me I'll outgrow it within a month, so I'm now looking at the Ninja 650. Suggestions?
At 22 you do not need your parent's permission to get a motorcycle but you also do not need any of the motorcycles you have listed above since you have no experience riding one.
The first thing you need to do is take a motorcycle riding training class so you can be trained properly under supervision.
After you get the training, get a street/dirt bike that is about a 250 and go ride trails where it is legal for you to do so.
Then continue to ride trails until you get more riding experience off road.
Then start taking the motorcycle for short rides on road to get more riding time on road and do not for any reason purchase a motorcycle that has way more power than you have experience.
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Old 12-10-2015, 03:19 PM
 
12,588 posts, read 14,717,519 times
Reputation: 18770
Quote:
Originally Posted by iTsLiKeAnEgG View Post
My mom worked as an RN for some time and I heard many similar stories. I've invested a lot of time searching for bikes and can easily afford it but a few years back I decided that it simply doesn't make sense.
2 types of riders......those that have fallen and those that are going to!

In the ER they call riders......Organ Donors!
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Old 12-10-2015, 03:20 PM
 
12,588 posts, read 14,717,519 times
Reputation: 18770
Quote:
Originally Posted by burdell View Post
How many of those riders were well trained, wearing the right gear, and sober/straight?

How many car wreck victims did she see? Would it make you stop driving?



A good rider approaches every other vehicle as if there's someone inside who will attempt to kill him and plans/acts accordingly.



A good rider can out brake and outmaneuver just about any car on the road.
A novice rider will do none of the above.......
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