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Old 10-09-2019, 12:37 AM
 
Location: BFE
1,408 posts, read 687,240 times
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My buddy has a boat at Tahoe. I'll just go hang out and sit and drink beer in it while its parked in the driveway. Trees, cool breeze, tunes, all good man.
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Old 12-04-2019, 09:41 PM
 
Location: Colorado Springs
3,700 posts, read 2,931,598 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by UpstateJohn View Post
Dad told me once the2 best days you own a boat are the day you get it, and the day you get rid of it. People like that are one reason I no longer own a boat.
IMO, owning a boat is no more stressful, expensive, or requires more work than a classic car. But, knowing that I would say there are people out there that shouldn’t own either.
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Old 01-23-2021, 04:36 PM
 
Location: Orange County, CA USA
335 posts, read 125,392 times
Reputation: 394
Back in the day, when I was launching off a trailer, it was great fun to watch people launch/retrieve their vessels. Trucks go in the water, boats miss the trailer completely, can't get the boat off the trailer no matter how far into the water they go, it never ends. When I had a boat in a slip, I would go down to it and just putter on it in the slip for hours.
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Old 01-24-2021, 12:09 AM
 
Location: San Francisco
4,729 posts, read 1,339,443 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by NDak15 View Post
Something I've noticed over the years with a few people is how stressed they get when they go boating or rafting. I've been around some people that seem to think putting a watercraft on the water is the most stressful thing they go through. The amount of screaming, yelling, and cussing that goes on when putting the watercraft onto the water is ridiculous. It's all fun and games when you are on the water but the second they're in sight of the shore when they're getting ready to leave the screaming, yelling, and cussing starts up again. What's up with that? I get it if people are running late and holding you up or people are being stupid or inconsiderate at a ramp but otherwise why the stress?

Has anyone else experienced this? I have a list of people I will not get on a watercraft with for this very reason.
Heh, I've not experienced it; then again, (saltwater) sailing is a different animal than freshwater boating (which, from my perspective, tends to be full of weekend crowds/traffic and nowhere to go). Sailing is often just as much about the destination i.e. exploration as it is about the skill (as well as the tranquility and/or adrenaline rush/challenge) in getting there.

That said, perhaps the people on your list need a new hobby. :-)
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Old 01-25-2021, 10:30 AM
 
Location: MD's Eastern Shore
2,591 posts, read 3,468,787 times
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I've seen plenty of saltwater "sailors" who should not be piloting a boat. I think a big misconception of sailboats is that they have right of way all the time. They don't!
But plenty of powerboaters shouldn't be driving boats either. Even though I like doing deliveries when I get the chance, I dread the borderline weather days when we have a tight schedule so we must go inside (intercoastal here on the east coast) and deal with the idiots, esp on a weekend. I much prefer heading out in the ocean and making time away from everybody as well. A big bonus is that we get to our destination much quicker as well.

And where I live can be idiot central on the weekends and holidays. I run fishing charters on my 22 ft center console and this year I'm not even going to be open for July 4th, Memorial Day and Labor Day. Drunks, boat rentals with people who don't know anything about boats. Clueless weekenders on there boats. If it wasn't so scary on those days it can be quite comical.

Then there is the boat ramps! You want entertainment? Hang out at a waterfront bar near a boat ramp on a pretty weekend. I can guarantee endless amusement!
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Old 01-25-2021, 09:48 PM
 
Location: San Francisco
4,729 posts, read 1,339,443 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by marlinfshr View Post
I've seen plenty of saltwater "sailors" who should not be piloting a boat. I think a big misconception of sailboats is that they have right of way all the time. They don't!
But plenty of powerboaters shouldn't be driving boats either.
Actually, there are (far) more inexperienced powerboaters who have no knowledge/concern for right-of-way rules/signals relative to safety (COLREGs), simply because sailing is (far) more difficult to master as well as it requires an initial (sometimes substantial) time/money investment. Additionally, most (particularly saltwater) sailors have completed a certification track relative to cruising and/or racing (and are more than cognizant of the nautical 'rules-of-the-road').

Screaming/yelling/cussing, per the OP, is far more likely to occur among inexperienced powerboaters who, in all likelihood, are frustrated by their own lack of skill and/or knowledge (and put others' safety at risk).
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Old 01-25-2021, 10:14 PM
 
Location: MD's Eastern Shore
2,591 posts, read 3,468,787 times
Reputation: 4577
Quote:
Originally Posted by CorporateCowboy View Post
Actually, there are (far) more inexperienced powerboaters who have no knowledge/concern for right-of-way rules/signals relative to safety (COLREGs), simply because sailing is (far) more difficult to master as well as it requires an initial (sometimes substantial) time/money investment. Additionally, most (particularly saltwater) sailors have completed a certification track relative to cruising and/or racing (and are more than cognizant of the nautical 'rules-of-the-road').

Screaming/yelling/cussing, per the OP, is far more likely to occur among inexperienced powerboaters who, in all likelihood, are frustrated by their own lack of skill and/or knowledge (and put others' safety at risk).
I see you are from the west coast. If you haven't already, you should come over here. Thank god I live on the coast as there is practically no sailing at all here. From the Delaware river/bay to southeastern NC any sailboats passing by are in the ocean as they wouldn't make it very far in our back bays and inlets. Now the Chesapeake? Whole other game.

Personally, I have not seen a difference in one or the other in regards to having more/less experienced operators. But up and down the intercoastal there are plenty of sail boaters who think they have the right of way by having their sail up. Come on people, we know your not straight lining it against a 2 knot current and 20 knot head wind without using your motor. Guess what? That is nothing more then a powerboat!

And I don't know where you got the idea of implying that there is more time/money invested in a sailboat. Have you priced out a powerboat lately? Just a motor? And just being a boat requires time to master it.

But considering that many sailboats hold up the fuel dock for a good bit while they get their 2 gallons of gas, pump out and fill the water tank while making a raid on the marinas toilet paper supply before heading into the bay and dropping anchor right in the channel, one would think all their money went to the boat.

I'll never forget the time about 4 or 5 of them came into one of the marinas for the night. Their nice peaceful sleep was disturbed at 3 to 6AM because the "powerboats" were starting up their diesels so they could go fishing. They had the audacity to complain to the dock master about it the next day. Quite funny actually as they were told they were welcome to leave and go someplace else.
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Old 01-25-2021, 10:44 PM
 
Location: San Francisco
4,729 posts, read 1,339,443 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by marlinfshr View Post

And I don't know where you got the idea of implying that there is more time/money invested in a sailboat. Have you priced out a powerboat lately? Just a motor? And just being a boat requires time to master it.

It's not a matter of purchasing a boat; in fact, that's the point. The typical 'holiday' freshwater powerboater can rent a boat/hop in (often with little to no knowledge/concern for rules/signals) whereas due to the skill-level required, the average (saltwater) 'sailor' has invested much time (if not money as well) relative to instruction i.e. learning and/or sharpening his skills in practice scenarios (and has likely purchased a sailboat to do so). It's a no-brainer the former is more likely to lose control/stress/cuss (as described by the OP) due to frustration born of ignorance or inexperience.

There's also a difference between sailing (which is the sport in and of itself) vs. powerboaters who are more concerned, generally speaking, with activities/fun on the water (per the thread) i.e. parties, water-skiing and so on.

Last edited by CorporateCowboy; 01-25-2021 at 11:41 PM.. Reason: typo
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Old 01-26-2021, 12:52 AM
 
Location: MD's Eastern Shore
2,591 posts, read 3,468,787 times
Reputation: 4577
Quote:
Originally Posted by CorporateCowboy View Post
It's not a matter of purchasing a boat; in fact, that's the point. The typical 'holiday' freshwater powerboater can rent a boat/hop in (often with little to no knowledge/concern for rules/signals) whereas due to the skill-level required, the average (saltwater) 'sailor' has invested much time (if not money as well) relative to instruction i.e. learning and/or sharpening his skills in practice scenarios (and has likely purchased a sailboat to do so). It's a no-brainer the former is more likely to lose control/stress/cuss (as described by the OP) due to frustration born of ignorance or inexperience.

There's also a difference between sailing (which is the sport in and of itself) vs. powerboaters who are more concerned, generally speaking, with activities/fun on the water (per the thread) i.e. parties, water-skiing and so on.
An idiot can just as likely rent a sailboat on the Chesapeake (saltwater) and many inland lakes. And I don't care what powers a boat but one should know the rules. Here we have lots of rivers. Surprisingly to many, MD has a very large coastline. These rivers have lots of tugs/barges and working commercial fishermen.

And, BTW, sailing is as much an "activity" and as much fun (I suppose but I don't see it) as any activities that can be done on a powerboat (But I don't see the point of water skiing or wakeboarding either).

And no, the average saltwater "sailor" does not invest any more time/money/instruction/sharpening of skills/etc... then one with a power boat. I have no idea where you came up with that idea! Either one you have those who are interested and fully want to learn and those who really don't give a care.

And as far as enjoyment/yelling/etc... I have seen more so called "sailor's" doing that then powerboaters by far. have been called number 1 and yelled at so many times by these idiots it's not even funny. They think we (power boaters) are trying to wake them when we politely call them on the radio as we approach and ask politely if they could just slow down a tad so we could pass them without pushing a wake. Then they start pointing and screaming as we come up on them quickly and pull it back so our wake can give us a slight push passed them as we are at idle speed. But nope, they won't slow down just a tad so we have to bump it up just slightly so we can get by them. A big sportfish doesn't push any water at 5 or 6 knots but when we have to bump it up to 10 or so to get by, we push a big wake. Then comes more screaming from them. Trawlers are there with the sail boaters as well. We can tell a professional captain on either of those vessels as they will slow down and wave us on by every time!
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Old 01-26-2021, 01:21 AM
 
Location: MD's Eastern Shore
2,591 posts, read 3,468,787 times
Reputation: 4577
Quote:
Originally Posted by CorporateCowboy View Post
Actually, there are (far) more inexperienced powerboaters who have no knowledge/concern for right-of-way rules/signals relative to safety (COLREGs), simply because sailing is (far) more difficult to master as well as it requires an initial (sometimes substantial) time/money investment. Additionally, most (particularly saltwater) sailors have completed a certification track relative to cruising and/or racing (and are more than cognizant of the nautical 'rules-of-the-road').

Screaming/yelling/cussing, per the OP, is far more likely to occur among inexperienced powerboaters who, in all likelihood, are frustrated by their own lack of skill and/or knowledge (and put others' safety at risk).
Far more difficult, huh. I wonder what the old school Hatteras and Oregon Inlet (NC) charter fleet with their single screw 50 to 60 footers would say about that. It's pretty impressive watching those guys wheel their boats in reverse into the slip. And a lot of times they are dealing with 25 to 35 knot winds as well. Speaking of that, it takes a lot of knowledge and skill to pilot one of those boats in and out of those inlets safely and calmly as well. Pucker factor can be quite high.

And there are several marinas here along the Chesapeake that have dock rodeos timing the speed they can put their single screw Chesapeake Bay Deadrises into the slip. Again, quite impressive and nobody pulls bow first in these slips. It's all stern to.

Personally, give me a twin screw on those rigs. Outboards are easy with one but with inboards, 2 are much better!

I do agree about the yelling coming from frustration and lack of experience. And sailboats and powerboats can claim the same share. I think what happens is that everybody is enjoying their day on the water but when its time to come in they start to panic as they realize they have to now put it in a slip or on a trailer. Without experience they don't take in wind and current as well as rudder positioning (on bigger twin engine boats) and pull of the prop for singles and they don't get lined up right. Que the over compensating and starting to use too much throttle and things can get quite harry. Then comes the yelling, therefore confusion from anybody else on the boat trying to get the lines, then more yelling. And usually by then they know all eyes are on them and that just adds to it. Everybody has to start somewhere and boating can be quie challenging for a newby when it comes to putting it in and out of a slip or on and off a trailer.
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