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Old 04-04-2021, 10:08 AM
 
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Do large cargo/container and all the other types of commercial and industrial ocean going vessels have dinghies? Or do you call them tenders too? What I mean is smaller attached or enclosed within vessel, boats and crafts they crew uses for utility purposes, and travel.

I have tried looking this up on internet and I cannot find anything for ships not of the luxury vacation purpose type like white yachts. I became fascinated by this topic from watching Below Deck. I got into ship design and layout, and the most interesting subject for me is tenders and how tenders get stored.

Then I thought to myself how useful they be on those large container ships. I just went to LI beach yesterday, and all I see are those ship on the horizon just floating there waiting for their turn to dock. A dinghy must be useful for resupply, or transiting to and from land. I think tender is called dinghy when not used for leisure.
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Old 04-04-2021, 11:42 AM
 
Location: on the wind
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Quote:
Originally Posted by NJ Brazen_3133 View Post
Do large cargo/container and all the other types of commercial and industrial ocean going vessels have dinghies? Or do you call them tenders too? What I mean is smaller attached or enclosed within vessel, boats and crafts they crew uses for utility purposes, and travel.

I have tried looking this up on internet and I cannot find anything for ships not of the luxury vacation purpose type like white yachts. I became fascinated by this topic from watching Below Deck. I got into ship design and layout, and the most interesting subject for me is tenders and how tenders get stored.

Then I thought to myself how useful they be on those large container ships. I just went to LI beach yesterday, and all I see are those ship on the horizon just floating there waiting for their turn to dock. A dinghy must be useful for resupply, or transiting to and from land. I think tender is called dinghy when not used for leisure.
There's so much overlap between the two terms it almost comes down to semantics. I doubt there's any formal distinction regarding industrial versus recreational.

IMHO, the terms differ because one is a descriptor for the physical form of a vessel. The other is a descriptor of a function.

A dinghy is a small, open, usually human or wind powered boat, though you could certainly plop a small outboard motor on many dinghies. Many small daysailing boats without fixed keels are referred to as dinghies. They had no connection, functional or otherwise, to any larger ship.

A tender is any vessel (dinghy or otherwise) that is used to transfer cargo or people from a large oceangoing ship to shore. It is tending to that larger ship. It could be fairly large and not be owned by or stored on the ship, the service could be hired. If you aren't using a vessel for that purpose, its not a tender. Taking it to an extreme, a helicopter that shuttles back and forth from ship to shore could be operating as a tender too.

Last edited by Parnassia; 04-04-2021 at 12:32 PM..
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Old 04-04-2021, 11:26 PM
 
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Originally Posted by Parnassia View Post
There's so much overlap between the two terms it almost comes down to semantics. I doubt there's any formal distinction regarding industrial versus recreational.

IMHO, the terms differ because one is a descriptor for the physical form of a vessel. The other is a descriptor of a function.

A dinghy is a small, open, usually human or wind powered boat, though you could certainly plop a small outboard motor on many dinghies. Many small daysailing boats without fixed keels are referred to as dinghies. They had no connection, functional or otherwise, to any larger ship.

A tender is any vessel (dinghy or otherwise) that is used to transfer cargo or people from a large oceangoing ship to shore. It is tending to that larger ship. It could be fairly large and not be owned by or stored on the ship, the service could be hired. If you aren't using a vessel for that purpose, its not a tender. Taking it to an extreme, a helicopter that shuttles back and forth from ship to shore could be operating as a tender too.
Most tenders that I see on superyachts are also the open and small but with motors.

But do you know whether or not the big containers ships have their own tenders, or do they outsource once near port, or outsource a helicopter?

Also I notice the yachts have rescue tenders some of then. If the ocean going cargo ships are out in middle of ocean and they notice a capsized boat, how do they render assistance without a dinghy/tender?

Or do they simply not do that because there is a chance its a ruse, and those in need are pirates?
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Old 04-06-2021, 12:53 PM
 
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But do you know whether or not the big containers ships have their own tenders, or do they outsource once near port, or outsource a helicopter?

Couldn't tell you. I bet a lot of them outsource. May depend on the company and what their purpose is when visiting ports. They may only do transfers while loading/unloading containerized cargo, so a tender isn't really necessary. They get tugged straight to the loading facility and leave from the loading facility.

Also I notice the yachts have rescue tenders some of then. If the ocean going cargo ships are out in middle of ocean and they notice a capsized boat, how do they render assistance without a dinghy/tender?

They probably keep a couple of inflatables stored on deck that they could deploy.

Or do they simply not do that because there is a chance its a ruse, and those in need are pirates?

Well, there's this:

UNCLOS | United Nations Convention on the Law of the Sea

Last edited by Parnassia; 04-06-2021 at 02:05 PM..
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Old 04-06-2021, 01:22 PM
 
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Generally, no, they do not. They coordinate with Class 1/2 vessels such as support vessels, crew ships, etc. in near-harbor areas if needed but primarily hang out in an offshore anchorage until some tugs can guide them into port.

Ocean-going vessels (OGVs) spend WAY too much time in open water to haul along tenders that are worthless while at sea. No tender within international waters could really get anywhere safely. Also, vessel owners/operators have GPS units to track their cargo; this will sound harsh, but the cargo they are carrying typically vastly outweigh the $ value of the limited onboard staff.

Most luxury yachts may exit state waters but do not have the capacity to exit federal waters, such that (for the US anyway) the Coast Guard provides assistance with their fleet of specialized vessels. That said, ANY vessel that becomes aware of another vessel in distress reports it into to the USCG.

ETA: I love Below Deck for the drama and the glimpse into "how the other half live"!! Such garbage entertainment and I can't get enough! But yachts are in zero way comparable to Class 3 vessels... the engine configurations, etc. are a whole different banana.
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Old 04-06-2021, 02:16 PM
 
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Originally Posted by gus2 View Post
ETA: I love Below Deck for the drama and the glimpse into "how the other half live"!! Such garbage entertainment and I can't get enough! But yachts are in zero way comparable to Class 3 vessels... the engine configurations, etc. are a whole different banana.
Me too. A guilty pleasure! I find the expectations of their spoiled clientele hilarious. It would be interesting to get a glimpse of the financial side. Of course they must play to the camera, but which captain entertains you most? I admire each of them for different reasons. Stuck up clients are bad enough...adding a film crew must be a royal PITA. Consider curmudgeonly Captain Lee...he's got to hate it when something rolls him over and exposes his softer underbelly.
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Old 04-07-2021, 10:57 AM
 
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Originally Posted by gus2 View Post

Most luxury yachts may exit state waters but do not have the capacity to exit federal waters, such that (for the US anyway) the Coast Guard provides assistance with their fleet of specialized vessels. That said, ANY vessel that becomes aware of another vessel in distress reports it into to the USCG.
Not always true...... a buddy was running a new 120 ft yacht 35 miles off the coast of VA, got hit by lightning. Misc fires were all extinguished but yacht was dead in the water. ZERO communication devices, all damaged. The dingy had its own GPS/radios and they had a satellite phone aboard. So they call the coast guard, this is an unlit yacht/dead in the water. USCG said they didn't have a vessel in the area, they called commercial tow boat. 8 hours later the vessel arrived and towed the yacht to shore.

My buddy didn't want to wait, didn't like the whole situation. Called a charter boat, said I don't want to fish but rather I need a ride back to shore! The fisherman came and got him, he took an uber from the marina to the airport and private jet was waiting for him. He was home in his bed before the tow boat picked up the yacht/crew. Yacht was totaled by the insurance company, he bought a new (bigger) one.

USCG was useless. They said if they weren't on fire or taking on water they would not dispatch anyone to come out.
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Old 04-07-2021, 11:04 AM
 
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Originally Posted by Parnassia View Post
Me too. A guilty pleasure! I find the expectations of their spoiled clientele hilarious. It would be interesting to get a glimpse of the financial side. Of course they must play to the camera, but which captain entertains you most? I admire each of them for different reasons. Stuck up clients are bad enough...adding a film crew must be a royal PITA. Consider curmudgeonly Captain Lee...he's got to hate it when something rolls him over and exposes his softer underbelly.


I wish they would have less "scolding" of a bad crew member. Seems way too played out over something small.

I've been aboard private yachts with crew, it was absolutely fantastic! They literally bend over backwards for everyone aboard. I was trying to carry out a bag, they said they preferred to take it so I don't scuff any of the woodwork surrounding the staircase! I never even thought of that!

Financial side: no matter what the price, it only takes some of the pain away from owning the vessel, it never pays for everything or turns a profit.

This was a pretty good interview on the topic:

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=EAZimLvVop8
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Old 04-07-2021, 11:24 AM
 
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First off, I'm so sorry your buddy had that experience!

Quote:
Originally Posted by City Guy997S View Post
Not always true...... a buddy was running a new 120 ft yacht 35 miles off the coast of VA, got hit by lightning.

Federal waters in the US extend 200 nautical miles from the coastline.

Misc fires were all extinguished but yacht was dead in the water. ZERO communication devices, all damaged.

All passenger vessels are required to have an AIS transponder. They may not have been able to observe it on-board, but the pings were still being sent. If they were reported missing, they would have shown up on satellite receivers (maybe terrestrial as well, but I'm not as familiar with the coverage there.
The dingy had its own GPS/radios and they had a satellite phone aboard. So they call the coast guard, this is an unlit yacht/dead in the water. USCG said they didn't have a vessel in the area, they called commercial tow boat. 8 hours later the vessel arrived and towed the yacht to shore.

My buddy didn't want to wait, didn't like the whole situation. Called a charter boat, said I don't want to fish but rather I need a ride back to shore! The fisherman came and got him, he took an uber from the marina to the airport and private jet was waiting for him. He was home in his bed before the tow boat picked up the yacht/crew. Yacht was totaled by the insurance company, he bought a new (bigger) one.

USCG was useless. They said if they weren't on fire or taking on water they would not dispatch anyone to come out.
First, USCG did send out a tow, though it's also not unusual to contact any other vessels to see if any that are closer are able (and willing) to provide quicker assistance. In most cases I know of (which, to be fair, is general knowledge with only a handful of particular instances), anybody would could respond, would. Assuming the fishing vessel was at shore and could go at a decent clip, 35 miles at ~22knots would be roughly an hour and a half there, so a 3-hour wait to get back onshore, min. Tow boats are slower, obviously so when they're towing a 38m vessel instead of a handful of people. So an 8-hour time from call to back at dock isn't so shabby.

Regardless, I would love to know which episode(s) your buddy is on!! And I hope that when he got the bigger yacht, he sprung for the helipad. Talk about response time!
And I LOVE my some Captain Lee. Love, love, love!!! And I can see how on a ship that gives you considerable leeway, any performance issue would be dealt with harshly. Plus it makes the episodes so much better!

Where are y'all watching it? I have to wait until it jumps over to some of the free (Peacock) or secondary sites (like hulu), and I don't know if there's another resource out there to get my crack!
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Old 04-07-2021, 02:00 PM
 
Location: on the wind
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Quote:
Originally Posted by City Guy997S View Post

My buddy didn't want to wait, didn't like the whole situation. Called a charter boat, said I don't want to fish but rather I need a ride back to shore! The fisherman came and got him, he took an uber from the marina to the airport and private jet was waiting for him. He was home in his bed before the tow boat picked up the yacht/crew.
Nice of him to ditch his disabled vessel and crew at sea just because the timing didn't suit him...sounds like a real peach of a skipper.
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