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Old 09-06-2009, 04:48 PM
 
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This seems like the wrong place for this post but I couldn't find another spot.

I am trying to decide on a canoe or kayak to learn on .
All I want to do is be able to paddle around the lake and maybe be able to carry a small ice chest and fishing pole.

The biggest problem is that I cannot lift very much weight so I want something light enough I could load/unload it into a truck bed .
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Old 09-06-2009, 10:04 PM
 
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Head on down to your local supplier ... a Bass Pro shops, or kayak/canoe dealer ... and pick up a few.

A neighbor of mine bought an all-plastic kayak for fishing on some of the local lakes and it's got to be less than 35 lbs ... although way too small/close fitting for me to fit into it comfortably.

We used to own an Old Town aluminum canoe that weighed less than 80 lbs, not too heavy to handle by oneself, although a little awkward.

If you're only fishing by yourself, a smaller craft is a better choice than a big cruising type canoe.

You might also look at some of the inflatables with rigid structures. They're transported in pieces and then assembled on site, so you carry smaller pieces for the craft. There's some very capable watercraft made this way.
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Old 09-10-2009, 03:01 PM
 
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Inflatable kayaks are the way to go. 30-40 lbs, roll up nice and small for easy storage and transport, good quality one will last years and years, more stable than hard shells, more forgiving. Even the larger ones are lighter than the hardshells. There is really no need for any type of rigid structure. If you get the right air pressure in the tubes, they will be as rigid as you want without having to deal with multiple pieces / transport and storage issues. I know guys who run class V all the time in inflatables as well as doing lake crusing, wave surfing, etc ... all in the same boat.

Check out the Aire models. They have any kind of design you could want including flatwater (better tracking) and whitewater. They have a good website that provides info on specifics of each model and you can search for local retailers. Prices are comparable to hardshells.
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Old 10-16-2009, 06:07 PM
Status: "Real estate broker. 32 yrs." (set 10 days ago)
 
Location: Northern Maine
10,232 posts, read 16,151,193 times
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Old Town never made aluminum canoes. In fact, Old Town canoe owners refer to aluminum canoes as "boomalum" because they are so noisy.
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Old 11-04-2009, 03:20 PM
 
Location: Houston/Heights
2,637 posts, read 4,129,017 times
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Maybe a good inner tube???
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Old 10-25-2018, 07:00 PM
 
Location: Paradise CA, that place on fire
1,328 posts, read 764,152 times
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We have a Point 65 modular kayak. Three different modules. All three fits in the back of my Hyundai Santa Fe Sport with the passenger seats folded.
When I unload it the time it takes is about 6 minutes for the three piece - that is a tandem kayak, or 4 minutes for the solo kayak to get it assembled. The choice depends if I'm alone or carry someone. Taking it apart needs the same time.
I can unload, assemble and be on the water quicker than it takes to unload a conventional kayak or canoe from a car-top carrier.

Mine is a sit-on-top kayak. There is no way to sink it and when it turns over you can flip it back and climb on it while watching as the kayak drains itself. The invidual pieces weigh less than 30 lbs; the solo is 48 lbs and the tandem is 79 lbs. Solo is 10 feet long, the tandem is 14 feet.

On rough water the tandem is more stable even for one person, and also faster a bit.

I also have a 10 feet, 37 lbs conventional sit-in kayak. It is faster and has better handling, but not as secure and stable as the sit-on-top. The worst part with the sit-in kayak is that after a 2-hour trip there will be some water inside. In a heavy rain, far from shore, have you seen the movie "Titanic" ? In a strong rain you need a skirt on the sit-in-kayak while with the sit-on-top the water drains out on the bottom because it has four holes. Holes in a boat ??? Sounds really dumb, but it works out well once you see it in practice.

When I beach the sit-in kayak after a trip I need to drain the water out of it through the drain plug. Don't lose it. Even so, to get it more or less dry I need a towel or a big sponge.
On the other hand, the sit-in has more room for carrying stuff, and it won't get tossed over which could happen with the sit-on-top.

I can carry the conventional kayak in the back of the Hyundai SUV, but I need to tie down the kayak and also the tailgate, which stays halfway open. It takes more time than assembling the modular kayak.

I prefer using the modular, I feel safer in it, but your mileage might vary. The modular cost much more; but then again, there are carbon fiber conventional kayaks in the $ 6-8,000 range.

If someone wants to know - the lighter sit-in kayak can be tipped over if you are not careful. You can get back, but one should practice this in really calm, shallow waters.
With the modular, sit-on-top kayak it is nearly impossible to turn it over. Once I tried it in shallow water and it was difficult for me, at my weight of 177 lbs.

Last edited by mgforshort; 10-25-2018 at 07:12 PM..
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Old 10-27-2018, 10:54 AM
 
Location: Cape Cod
16,003 posts, read 10,553,072 times
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There are so many combos out there today from a few hundred dollars to a few thousand.
There are kayaks and canoes built for any application. I have a short 8' starter kayak but bought a 12' old towne that is much better. The longer the kayak the easier it is to paddle on long trips. Both have enclosed cockpits that keep me drier than an open design would. Open designs are often used for fishing.



I have been in antique canoes and modern ones both long and short one man ones. Weight makes a difference in a canoe because you generally sit higher than you would in a kayak.



You can get a dolly for both boats which will help in getting it from truck to water.

In my experience canoes need to be a bit longer than a kayak to be better in the water which means more weight, more room needed to transport it and store it.



Many basic starter kayaks have keels which help you to avoid tipping.

I'd say get yourself to a dealer and check out your options. Don't forget to get a comfortable life vest and a light weight paddle.
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Old 10-31-2018, 10:01 PM
 
Location: Jewel Lake (Sagle) Idaho
34,678 posts, read 20,900,363 times
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IMO, depends on how you're going to use it. It's hard to beat the versatility of a canoe. White water/still water/one person/two person/cargo, it can do it all. I have a 16' Mad River. But it's perhaps not optimum for any one place. Kayaks will generally be faster in most conditions, but lack flexibility. A sea kayak doesn't do white water and vice versa. A two person one doesn't work well at all with one person.

I'm kind of interested in the cat-a-rafts/inflatable pontoon designs. As I get older I don't tolerate kneeling in a canoe very well. These things can do white water or ponds/lakes. I suspect they are a PITA in a decent breeze, but so is a canoe.
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Old 11-01-2018, 01:24 PM
 
Location: Paradise CA, that place on fire
1,328 posts, read 764,152 times
Reputation: 3650
From my personal experience, a tandem kayak is faster and more comfortable than a single when used by one paddler only. The longer boat tracks better and sits higher in the water, so a little bit faster.
The only difference is that loading / unloading isn't as easy - that is for a single person.

I'd love to have a 16 feet long, lightweight single kayak for the speed and handling, but I don't want the hassle of trailering it.
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Old 11-01-2018, 11:13 PM
 
Location: Jewel Lake (Sagle) Idaho
34,678 posts, read 20,900,363 times
Reputation: 21022
Quote:
Originally Posted by mgforshort View Post
From my personal experience, a tandem kayak is faster and more comfortable than a single when used by one paddler only. The longer boat tracks better and sits higher in the water, so a little bit faster.
The only difference is that loading / unloading isn't as easy - that is for a single person.

I'd love to have a 16 feet long, lightweight single kayak for the speed and handling, but I don't want the hassle of trailering it.
The problem I had when I tried solo with a tandem kayak was that the front sits high-which makes it a real pita in a breeze. If you use a rudder it's more manageable. Solo in a canoe you can get near the center and level it a little better. Granted-it's still a pita in any kind of strong breeze-at least one without a good keel.
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