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Old 01-22-2014, 09:29 AM
 
Location: Ashburn, VA
2,794 posts, read 2,915,570 times
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Randomly clicked on this article and figured I'd share it with everyone to see what they think and if they remember some (if not all) of these movies and shed some light if they thought they were in fact truly that bad!

This list shows movies that LOST money due to high budgets and extremely poor box-office showings and it does have inflation to today's money standards.

The 8 Biggest Film Box Office Disasters of All Time


8. Heaven’s Gate (1980) — $114.4 Million

When it comes to film history, the Heaven’s Gate disaster is often pointed to as the key event that led American filmmaking away from director-driven projects, as studios sought to assume control over projects — something that hasn’t changed since.
Just how disastrous was Heaven’s Gate? On a budget of $44 million, the film earned only $3.4 million at the box office. Adjusted for inflation, Heaven’s Gate cost approximately $124 million and earned $9.6 million at the box office, losing $114.4 million for what was essentially an art-house western.


7. Town & Country (2001) — $122.7 Million

Town & Country was plagued with problems throughout the production, including extensive rewrites that led to re-shoots a year after the film originally wrapped. While re-shoots are not uncommon in Hollywood productions, the extent to whichTown & Country was reshot certainly was. Making matters worse, the film’s actors, which included Warren Beatty, Diane Keaton, and Goldie Hawn, were subsequently paid their entire salary again, leading the film’s budget to spiral out of control.
When the smoke cleared from the film’s disastrous production and theater run, Town & Country had earned only $10.4 million on a budget that had ballooned to $105 million. In what can be considered the biggest tentpole rom-com box office bomb of all time


6. The 13th Warrior (1999) — $135.5 Million

Based on Michael Crichton’s Eaters of the Dead, Buena Vista was banking on The 13th Warrior building off the huge success of Crichton’s Jurassic Park adaptation from a few years prior.
The total cost of The 13th Warrior has been debated over the years, with some reports indicating that it might actually be the biggest box office bomb of all-time, but the film’s total cost is generally agreed to have been around $160 million — a stunning number in 1999 that rises to $223 million when adjusted for inflation. While the film wasn’t terrible at the box office, earning $61.7 million, it wasn’t nearly enough for a film with a budget that had spiraled completely out of control. In total, the film oversaw a net loss of $98.3 million in 1999, which equals about a $135.5 million loss when adjusted for inflation.


5. Mars Needs Moms (2011) — $138.8 Million

Coming in with a production budget of $150 million and marketing costs upwards of $25 million,Mars Needs Moms had a long way to go before simply breaking even. But even the studio’s worst case scenario was probably not as bad as the film’s total box office earnings of only $39 million. The film’s performance ultimately led Disney to lose $136 million in 2011, which goes up to about $138.8 million when adjusted for inflation.


4. Sahara (2005) — $143.1 Million

The story of Sahara’s financial failure is the subject of many detailed reports that outline the complexities of so-called Hollywood accounting and even some potentially illegal financial transactions between Hollywood and the Moroccan government where the film was shot. But when it comes down to it, Sahara was simply too expensive.
According to reports, Sahara cost upwards of $240 million to produce, about $80 million of which went towards distribution expenses. But unlike many films on this list, Sahara wasn’t necessarily a box office bomb, earning a respectable $119.3 million. The problem was that Sahara really had no shot at making its money back, losing $119.9 million despite earning over $100 million at the box office — when adjusted for inflation, Sahara’s losses rise to about $143.1 million.


3. The Adventures of Pluto Nash (2002) — $144.1 Million

With a production budget of about $100 million and a marketing cost of $20 million, The Adventures of Pluto Nash earned only $7.1 million at the box office, with a total cost of $120 million putting the film’s 2002′s losses just over $113 million. Adjusted for inflation, the film comes in at a loss of $144.1 million and is easily the worst-performing film of Eddie Murphy’s career — and is in some ways a film that he has never recovered from.


2. The Alamo (2004) — $144.9 Million

When you look at director John Lee Hancock’s filmography, you’ll notice a five-year gap between the years of 2004 and 2009 where Hancock doesn’t have either a writing or directing credit. That gap is probably the result of the huge box office failure of his 2004 film, The Alamo, which is only a hair away from being the worst financial failure in film history.
With a total cost of $145 million, The Alamo only earned $25.8 million at the box office, leading to a loss of $119.2 million. When adjusted for inflation, that means that The Alamo lost $144.9 million — only half a million from reaching the top of this list.


1. Cutthroat Island (1995) — $145.4 Million

Up until Pirates of the Caribbean: The Curse of the Black Pearl was released in 2003, pirate-themed films had been deemed box office poison mostly due to the record-breaking box office flop of Cutthroat Island. Despite being released in 1995, the film’s box office actuals are still fairly frightening, but when those same numbers are adjusted for inflation it gets downright scary.
Before the Guinness Book of World Records retired the record of “largest box office loss,” MGM’s Cutthroat Island was firmly entrenched in the spot with $10 million earned at the box office against a budget of $98 million along with $17 million in marketing expenses. Adjusted for inflation, Cutthroat Island lost the studio a total of $145.4 million and remains the worst financial disaster in film history.
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Old 01-22-2014, 10:56 AM
 
Location: England
26,273 posts, read 8,372,148 times
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The list is mainly pretty dire movies. I do like 'Heaven's Gate' though. There is a good film in there somewhere....... some fantastic scenes in this overlong movie. It pretty much ruined a number of careers. The director, Michael Cimino, never recovered from the fiasco of this film. I believe he has been involved in a new directors cut.

Other directors go back to films that seem to haunt them. I think 'Blade Runner' is one of the greatest movies ever made, but Ridley Scott obviously doesn't agree, and I believe there are at least three versions of this fabulous film.
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Old 01-22-2014, 12:19 PM
 
Location: SCW, AZ
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I, friggin' love 13h Warrior! To hell with the box-office loss, etc.
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Old 01-22-2014, 02:23 PM
 
Location: Miami, FL
8,087 posts, read 9,767,115 times
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13th Warrior is very entertaining. I read on IMDB that it sat for a few years as well prior to release. A bit of a niche classic now after a few viking themed films(Vallaha Rising, Pathfinder,Outlander) and the television series Vikings.
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Old 01-22-2014, 07:32 PM
 
Location: The Great West
2,084 posts, read 2,606,065 times
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Big box-office disasters are amusing to read about. Then I always think of Zyzzyx Road (2006).

According to Wikipedia, of a budget of $1.3 million, its total domestic gross at the box office was $30. Impressive! Yeah it was played in one theater only, but still.
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Old 01-22-2014, 07:37 PM
 
Location: Maine
22,823 posts, read 28,030,903 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by English Dave View Post
The list is mainly pretty dire movies. I do like 'Heaven's Gate' though. There is a good film in there somewhere...
Well said. There is a great movie in there somewhere. But the director never found it. He glimpsed it occasionally, but the greatness eluded him.

Cutthroat Island really is one of the worst movies ever made. In all my life, I've only paid for a movie ticket, then walked out before it was over, on two movies. Cutthroat Island was one of them. It was too painful to finish.
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Old 01-22-2014, 07:43 PM
 
Location: Minnesota
1,067 posts, read 1,185,701 times
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The title "Town and Country" in itself doomed the movie. The first thing I thought about was the Chrysler made "Mini-Van" Not a good sign!
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Old 01-23-2014, 01:38 AM
 
Location: England
26,273 posts, read 8,372,148 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Mark S. View Post
Well said. There is a great movie in there somewhere. But the director never found it. He glimpsed it occasionally, but the greatness eluded him. .
Talking about 'Heaven's Gate' made me dig out my video copy of it from 30 years ago! I have ordered a DVD of the 'director's cut.' I will receive it in a few days........ May be, on my big telly screen, and this new edition, I will learn to love this slow...... very slow....... film!
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Old 01-23-2014, 11:20 AM
 
Location: Parts Unknown, Northern California
48,564 posts, read 23,954,971 times
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"The Alamo" was a very good film with some excellent performances, especially by Billy Bob Thornton. Unlike previous films which centered on the siege and battle, "The Alamo" made an attempt to present the actual history in a balanced way, giving us multiple points of view.

Maybe that was the problem, people have been trained by Disney, Wayne, and the Daughters of the Alamo, to think that it was all 100 % American virtue at work. They could not accept a less glamorous approach.
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Old 01-25-2014, 05:47 AM
 
Location: England
26,273 posts, read 8,372,148 times
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My DVD copy of a directors cut of 'Heaven's Gate' has arrived this morning in the mail. Three and a half hours long...... gulp. My wife and I will watch it tonight. Mebbe somehow, Michael Cimino has found the movie he wanted to show. I don't know if he had access to footage cut from the original film. The reviews on the back of the DVD sing it's praises. Apparently it has gone from one of the biggest boring duds of all time to a masterpiece. We shall see.......
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