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Old 11-11-2008, 02:59 PM
 
70 posts, read 280,103 times
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I moved out of Chicago to Dallas about 4 years ago and the way properties are valued is very different in each city. In Chicago your taxes are based on the value of your home, in Dallas your taxes are based on the value of the neighborhood. So for example, in Chicago you can live in a neighborhood where there are homes appraised by the appraisal district between $250,000-$700,000, so your property tax depends on the value of your home. The way Dallas does is it can be a problem, lets say I happen to get an terrific deal on a house. Say I buy a house for $250,000 in a neighborhood where homes are appraised in the $500,000’s, it doesn’t matter if the house is small or rundown the appraisal district believes that as long as that home is in that neighborhood it’s worth the same. That means my property tax will be based off of the value of my home in that neighborhood. It doesn’t matter if I paid $250,000 or less I am going to pay approximately 2% of $500,000. When you do the math it’s $5,000 versus $10,000. So I’m wondering, how do property appraisals work in Florida? Mainly interested in Naples and the Miami area? I am thinking of moving to Florida to be close to the beach
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Old 11-11-2008, 03:38 PM
 
Location: where my heart is
5,642 posts, read 8,749,629 times
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We bought our house last December for $285,000 (estate sale). We don't have a pool, but homes in our development with a pool are generally going for in the low $400,000. We were assessed at $375,000. Our property taxes are $4,500.

Yes, they will go by what similar homes in the development/area are selling for, not what you actually paid for it.
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Old 11-11-2008, 09:13 PM
 
Location: Fort Myers, FL
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so if you live in chicago, dallas or naples/miami your going to pay the same way, lol. i don't think you realized you already understoond how it works. fyi taxes are based on mileage of the value of the property.

what you will see is mileages will increase as the county appraiser lowers values, to keep the ridiculous amount of tax money coming in, that for some reason they don't return even when there is a surplus.

traditionally in small towns the county appraiser will take the average/median of the street and tax everyone the same. this doesn't happen in florida they depend on that money
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Old 11-12-2008, 05:53 AM
 
Location: Full time in the RV
3,211 posts, read 7,062,001 times
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This thread may hep:

//www.city-data.com/forum/miami...dade-city.html
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Old 11-12-2008, 09:11 AM
 
Location: Fort Myers, FL
1,286 posts, read 2,756,650 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by RMD3819 View Post

may help what?

so you think its not fair that a guy owns a home for less than the exemption and that he not pay enough taxes? just curious, but what do you think the overhead is for a rural town of 1,000 people as opposed to say lee county (fort myers) where there is 640,000 people or collier county (naples) with 400,000 people.

think about this more historically. homestead exemption is federal law, started as a way to get people to take the free government bonded land and settle. exemption was set at $2,000, which for many, many years the property didn't surpass the value of. they put in protections so that people wouldn't lose their homes to debt collectors (ever notice in the westerns, how they are always chasing them off the land or trying to get them to sign with witness'.) 1981 Colorado was the first state to enact a its own state laws extended the regulation and limits.

perhaps you don't understand how property taxes work. this is not some illegal conspiracy. taxes have always been calculated off the value. everyone is paying the same way. when you purchase your taxes are assessed based on value of the time of purchase. historically people didn't move every 5-7 years either. perhaps the law is outdated a bit. the save our homes act was a nice attempt to update to a mobile country that we are, but still failed in my eyes. homestead exemption is what states the limitations for the increasing of tax. the rules are the same for everyone. if your home is not homesteaded or you don't qualify for homestead then you don't get the protections.

one thing i personally don't understand is how the local government isn't following the law. they have had surplus' of taxes for years and strive to figure out ways to spend it, instead of returning it. the builder is still building in my community, knowing the prices we have in here, most of my neighbors, including myself are paying $10,000 a year in taxes. the county is getting roughly $4,000,000 just from our community and as you know 400 units/homes is a small community here. based on that calculation the main side street i am located off contributes roughly $20,000,000+ from our 5 communities on street. 40% of our communities are investor/2nd homes, as well that don't qualify for the exemption.

i will agree however that the save our homes act was a waste of time and a failed idea that didn't solve the problems of those who were complaining, which was the investors, second home owners and those seeking to relocate. instead of helping the housing industry they did nothing but give a complicated benefit to locals who hardly and rarely move locally. the local real estate consists of 40% non-residents.

add to that the skyrocketing price of insurance because of the pan handle and the lower east coast hit by hurricanes every year.

Last edited by brokerdave; 11-12-2008 at 09:25 AM..
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Old 11-12-2008, 02:03 PM
 
Location: Full time in the RV
3,211 posts, read 7,062,001 times
Reputation: 2928
I posted that link because several of the posts explain the disparity in home taxes because of SOH and homestead.

I never said anything about a conspiracy. The example I gave about the guy who pays almost no taxes was a coworker. We both live-and work-in the same county-Collier.
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