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Old 07-11-2015, 07:36 AM
 
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Looking at a few homes, one has crawl space, other on a slab in Savannah sub division.
Are there any concerns when home is on slab?
Just curious as most homes back in NY had basement.

Thanks in advance
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Old 07-11-2015, 08:25 AM
 
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Both are typical construction foundations in the south and generally speaking, both are fine. However I have a preference for crawl space and the reason is this: if you have plumbing issues and the plumbing is encased in concrete, i.e., a slab, fixing your plumbing with a jackhammer is pretty low on the fun quotient. ...
Also, putting the house on a crawl space foundation lifts the house above grade, which I happen to like. As stated above, this also allows all the services (ductwork, plumbing, etc) to be easily accessible.
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Old 07-12-2015, 06:48 AM
 
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Moisture in the crawlspace is a concern around here. A lot of people answer "No, haven't had any problems" when asked about their crawlspace. They haven't had problems, because they haven't been down in there to check. A new/recent slab has the pex lines enclosed in a tube that allows plumbers to tie on and reroute new lines without breaking up concrete or any evasive procedures. New slab homes have a couple of sewer cleanout points to avoid having to break up concrete for that also. I will take a well respected home builder who has good concrete foundation pouring/prep company any day of the week over the problems I have heard with some people's crawlspace issues.
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Old 07-12-2015, 07:49 AM
 
Location: Sweet Home Chicago!
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Many homes down here have basements, but slabs are not uncommon. If you don't get a basement, where are you going to store all your junk?
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Old 07-12-2015, 08:42 AM
 
Location: Franklin, TN
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Hmmm, in MY experience, homes with basements are rare in the Nashville area and even then, it's more just the case of a house being built into the side of a slope.

My house (small) is on a slab, and I was a bit concerned as, coming from the northeast, we ALWAYS had a basement. I did run into a little issue when I had the HVAC unit replaced. The conduit built into the slab was not big enough for the new size of required piping. So I had to relocate the unit from the backyard to the side yard. I'm actually very happy to have it moved from outside a wall of the master bedroom, to outside the wall of the garage BUT it was an issue.

I'm thinking that not all slab homes are created equal and that perhaps a newer or higher end house might have made larger 'tubes' like JJAF mentioned. Do agree that a crawl space might be a moisture magnet OR a critter house. I have at least a couple of chipmunks living under my deck . . .
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Old 07-12-2015, 10:34 AM
 
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Homes on slabs: What Willie1212 said, if any sort of plumbing got run under the slab. My home in Southern California was on a slab and I loved it.

Homes on basements: not that common in certain areas of Tennessee due to all the rock; not little rock, big honkin'stuff that can't be dug out even if you have a lot of money. The homes I had in PA had basements and I loved them.

Homes on crawl spaces: our current home in TN is on a crawl space. We have been here 12 years and have never had a moisture issue. That is because the home sits on high ground and Mister Norma pit VISQUeen under the house. He checks under the house twice yearly when he opens or closes the vents in the crawl space blocks. But, believe me, if we had any moisture issues, the odor would permeate up thru the floors. I'm good with this crawl space too.

All three house foundations have a purpose that is predicated upon the soil and rock conditions first, the homeowners pocketbook second
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Old 07-12-2015, 10:38 AM
 
Location: South of DAYTON
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Default New elevated Slab

I agree with JJAF comments above. . We are in eastern part of state, North Hamilton county and getting a new house built this month.. Our last house , 8 yrs old had a crawl,space... Possible tornado shelter if last resort in storm,, copper plumbing,, etc...... Newer building and energy inspection codes have many benefits over a older house... Slight slope on our dirt grade has sort of elevated slab... Newer color coded PEX plumbing... Furnace in the ceiling, thus duct work, higher SEER rating... Actual price on new cont is lower than resales... Our house insurance quote is Very Low with discounts...
.....

Last edited by SPLIT; 07-12-2015 at 10:42 AM.. Reason: pic added
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Old 07-17-2015, 06:18 PM
 
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This is interesting. I will say I know of some high end homes on a slab that have indeed seen the jackhammering fate and they were built within the past four years.

Being from the NE as well, it does seem like basements are somewhat rare and paradoxically much more needed in a tornado prone area.

I feel like from a resale position crawl space homes might have the edge, but that may be because many (admittedly myself included) probably haven't seen a lot of the "souped up" slabs with the easy utility/mechanical access.

I have a crawl space now, but it's admittedly a love/hate relationship. Anyone out there know how radon issues play out in these two scenarios? Is one or the other better? Radon levels tend to be on the high side in many areas of Middle TN from what I've heard.
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Old 07-20-2015, 02:51 PM
 
Location: Gallatin, TN
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Siamese Kitty View Post
I have a crawl space now, but it's admittedly a love/hate relationship. Anyone out there know how radon issues play out in these two scenarios? Is one or the other better? Radon levels tend to be on the high side in many areas of Middle TN from what I've heard.
I asked my home inspector this very question several years ago, going from a home with a crawlspace to a home on slab. My thought was like yours...a slab would have more protection; however he said you can have radon in either. I don't recall him saying there was a less risk in one or the other. I opted for the test just to be on the safe side and it was negative.

My take on the crawlspace v. slab issue has more to do with the age of the home in my experience. Older homes = much more likely to have crawlspace. Newer home = tossup but probably more likely to have a slab.

I will always remember the words of the same trusted home inspector (on my first home): "If a house has a crawlspace in middle Tennessee, it has had water in it." Maybe not much, and maybe it drained very quickly, but the geography lends itself to having standing water in crawlspaces. That home did have a crawlspace and did have water under it during heavy periods of rain...but it also drained very quickly too. I didn't like it, but I never saw any complications from it either.
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Old 07-20-2015, 03:53 PM
 
114 posts, read 119,227 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by DonCorleone View Post
I asked my home inspector this very question several years ago, going from a home with a crawlspace to a home on slab. My thought was like yours...a slab would have more protection; however he said you can have radon in either. I don't recall him saying there was a less risk in one or the other. I opted for the test just to be on the safe side and it was negative.
That's really interesting, thank you for sharing! I know I once tested my crawl and came back with a highish normal number. We put down a vapor barrier and that mitigated it to the point where radon barely registered. That said, cement is porous so I suppose it makes sense. That's great that your house tested completely negative!

Some new homes are putting the radon vent in when building. I thought about that later. Think I'd want that.
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