U.S. CitiesCity-Data Forum Index
Covid-19 Information Page
Go Back   City-Data Forum > General Forums > Nature
 [Register]
Please register to participate in our discussions with 2 million other members - it's free and quick! Some forums can only be seen by registered members. After you create your account, you'll be able to customize options and access all our 15,000 new posts/day with fewer ads.
View detailed profile (Advanced) or search
site with Google Custom Search

Search Forums  (Advanced)
Reply Start New Thread
 
Old 06-28-2011, 08:02 PM
 
Location: Mountains of middle TN
5,244 posts, read 14,690,276 times
Reputation: 6083

Advertisements

Our son found a tiny (I know they're all tiny) baby bobwhite quail. It was by their pool, totally soaked in chlorine water. Didn't seem to be doing to good so instead of leaving it, he brought it in and rinsed it off and gave it a warm box with grass and paper towels to dry in.

He's going to keep it over night to make sure it didn't ingest any chlorine or doesn't have any adverse effects from it and then will release it tomorrow. In the meantime, what can he feed it that he would have in the house? As a last resort, if they have a neighbor with birds, can he give it bird seed? Bread? Anything anyone can think of?
Rate this post positively Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message

 
Old 06-28-2011, 08:35 PM
 
Location: North Western NJ
6,591 posts, read 22,293,018 times
Reputation: 9621
the bird seed would be fine but ideally he needs some grit too.
when in doubt boil an egg and mush mush mush... and add a little sugar to its water, young quail tend to need a high protein diet (in the wild they pretty much eat bugs and grass/seeds from day one) so they tend to do well on high protein content.
Rate this post positively Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
 
Old 06-28-2011, 08:42 PM
 
Location: Mountains of middle TN
5,244 posts, read 14,690,276 times
Reputation: 6083
Thank you!

John said we can release it out back. I'm not releasing it alone though, so we are getting about 30 more of them tomorrow. I'll keep them inside a few weeks before we release them out back. Excited! They're precious little things!
Rate this post positively Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
 
Old 06-28-2011, 09:03 PM
 
Location: North Western NJ
6,591 posts, read 22,293,018 times
Reputation: 9621
if your getting more pick up a game bird starter/chick crumble feed to get them through to release time, you can add mushed up boiled egg, veggies ect to it after a few weeks as long as you supply grit, but the game bird starter will get them off to a good strong beginning
Rate this post positively Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
 
Old 06-28-2011, 09:13 PM
 
4,919 posts, read 20,792,544 times
Reputation: 6236
I called my neighbor 9since this is normal daily work for her0 and asked what to feed in an emergency using typical household product. She said to take some rice, any other grains (coud be cereal like Special k or Grape Nuts), any oats and mash them together similar to what corn meal is like. If you have any raw natuaral nuts (walnuts, cashews, peanuts or even hard dry corn) those could be added as well so long as they are not processed with salt and flavor. Add a small finger swipe of peanut or almond butter and even a drop or two of honey. The concern is that chlorine is an appitite suppressor in yourng quails so food intake is important. You also want to hydrate the bird. That;s a good emeregncy common household product solution. She does recommend having someone familar with them give it a checkup before attemtping release.

She also said to call your local or state game and fish and see if there is a rescue relase group in your area. They usually take them in and care for them until cleared for release.

I know how you feel and aren't they not only beautiful but expressive as well. Good luck and keep us informed.
Rate this post positively Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
 
Old 06-29-2011, 06:00 AM
 
Location: SE Michigan
6,191 posts, read 16,213,155 times
Reputation: 10279
Go on your state DNR website and look for a wildlife rehabilitator - they will be listed by county, ask them what and how to feed baby birds. It can be sort of complicated; you can kill them with improper feeding if they aspirate food. I have a friend who is a wildlife rehabber, but she isn't up yet and won't answer phone or email until later. DM me if you want to to find out how to feed the baby and I can get back to you tonight!

I know she uses canned cat food, raw meat shreds and things like that for carnivorous birds, and something she mixes up with cereal and other ingredients for others. Perhaps similar to what PacificFlights suggested. I've helped her feed baby birds but don't know exactly what she uses.
Rate this post positively Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
 
Old 06-29-2011, 07:16 AM
 
Location: Visitation between Wal-Mart & Home Depot
8,308 posts, read 35,830,141 times
Reputation: 7117
Quote:
Originally Posted by chiroptera View Post
Go on your state DNR website and look for a wildlife rehabilitator - they will be listed by county, ask them what and how to feed baby birds. It can be sort of complicated; you can kill them with improper feeding if they aspirate food. I have a friend who is a wildlife rehabber, but she isn't up yet and won't answer phone or email until later. DM me if you want to to find out how to feed the baby and I can get back to you tonight!

I know she uses canned cat food, raw meat shreds and things like that for carnivorous birds, and something she mixes up with cereal and other ingredients for others. Perhaps similar to what PacificFlights suggested. I've helped her feed baby birds but don't know exactly what she uses.
A wildlife rehabber may be adamant about delivering the bird into his/her care immediately. They'll tell you everything you need to know about raising baby starlings, pigeons and sparrows but they tend to take their certifications and the MBTA 1917 pretty seriously...
Rate this post positively Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
 
Old 06-29-2011, 09:14 AM
 
Location: North Western NJ
6,591 posts, read 22,293,018 times
Reputation: 9621
quail are not songbirds, not parrots, they do not need to be syrnge fed, the parent birds do not feed them, they are epected to eat on their own from day 1, so no worries about hand feeding...no syrnge feeding ect...

you can get game bird starter at almost any feed store, remember people keep quail as food sources, they are bouthg and osld like chickens and turkey chicks.

cerial and such is ok in emergencies, but bird food and game bird starter is a much better choice because cerial is loaded with sugar and the graines we have in out cupboards are highly refined and cannot be properly digested. typically all you need to do to "teach" a quail to eat is sprinkle a little then tap it wiht your finger...momma would show her brood how to eat simply by eating her self...
in the wld they consume small insects, worms, seeds and greens.

wether he will adapt to being in captivity even for a short time will 100% depend, however having a batch of buddies for him will help, quail do not like to be alone and stress quite easily.

you can find alot of info on raising quail online because the cortinux is a commonly kept quail by famrers and SS-ers for a food source. and the care of all quail is pretyt much identical

if it hadnt been for the fact this little guy had gotten into the pool water i would have suggested releasing him imediatly...mommas probbaly still around, quail can be quite protective of their chicks. and if hes feathered he would be out of the nest already completly and independant.
Rate this post positively Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
 
Old 06-29-2011, 06:06 PM
 
Location: SE Michigan
6,191 posts, read 16,213,155 times
Reputation: 10279
Quote:
Originally Posted by jimboburnsy View Post
A wildlife rehabber may be adamant about delivering the bird into his/her care immediately. They'll tell you everything you need to know about raising baby starlings, pigeons and sparrows but they tend to take their certifications and the MBTA 1917 pretty seriously...
Depends, I guess. My friend answers calls all day long and hands out advice about how to care for or what to do with found birds or wild animals. She takes her certs very seriously, and is incredibly knowledgeable. I've been at her house and listened to her advising people countless times.

Now I am not sure what MBTA 1917 is....does this refer to animals and birds that a rehabber can't accept, or can only accept if they have the correct certifications? I do know she is extremely careful to stay on the right side of the law, like not taking skunks, not accepting animals from other counties or regions, and so on. I know there are birds and animals she can only take in on a temporary/emergency basis - raptors and fawns, I know. She has to transfer them to a certified rehabber after so much time because she doesn't have the facilities.

I do know (echoing what foxy said, and from what my friend tells me) that many people "rescue" baby wild animals and birds when really, they are doing more harm than good because often "abandoned" babies aren't actually abandoned and removing them is wrong.

Anyhow....either way, I hope the little quail is doing OK.
Rate this post positively Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
 
Old 06-29-2011, 09:12 PM
 
Location: North Western NJ
6,591 posts, read 22,293,018 times
Reputation: 9621
its actually MBTA 1918, migratory bird treaty act (1917) and its a law put in place to protect migratory species of birds from poachers and "well meaning citizens"

the reason we wildlife rehabbers take out "certifications" and the laws seriously is because w care about what happens to our native wildife, we also care about peoples safety...

firslty most people are not equipt to take in, properly raise and correctly rehabilitate a wild animal, most folks that mean well takng in these animals 1: often take them whn not needed to be rescued (ie many ground nesting owl species) and 2: they inadvertedly desensitize these animals to humans making them more at risk and more A risk as the animal matures...a raccoon for example raised by humans as a "pet" is more likley to break into homes and beg for food and even chase people because they never learn any kind of healthy fear of humans...part of a rehabbers job is to make sure even while bottle feedng young babies that these animals never truly imprint on people and as soon as they are old enough they are completly weaned off human contact and left to become WILD...

again many well emaning folks also think they are doing right by bringing home that baby owl they gound on the ground, or moving that box turtle thats in danger crossing the street ect...
but in reality they do more harm than good, birds that fall form the nest will NOT be abandoned if they smell like humans, birds have limited sense of smell, owls on the ground arnt nessicarily abandoned, many owls nest on the ground, bo turtles will spent thier entire life trying to get back to the place you removed them from...ect...

then theres the health hazards, MANY wild animals carry many diseses that can be transmitted to other pets and humans...rabies being the obvious one, but small mamals carry all kinds of bacteria, the flas and ticks these critters carry can also bear numeroud illnesses, wild birds can carry avian illnesses that can be transmitted to pet birds and local meat flocks ect...

rehabilitiating an animal isnt as easy as "oh how cute ill help the little guy out"

no quail are a little different, same goes for most game birds, they are capable of eating on their own from day 1, meaning in terms of rehab beyond keeping them safe till there big enough to get away from danger theres not much rehabbing to do...and 2: qual (along with most game birds) NEVER tame down...not enough to make releasing even captive bred quial a risk...they instinctually avoid humans even if humans have fed them from hatching, quail dont imprint like waterfowl and dont bond like domestic fowl can/do. they stay "wild"

now personally im ct lisenced vector species rehabber, i speciliz in animals that carry rabies obviously, and i typically focus on fox, coyote, bats and skunk...(i tend to do the ones other people dont want lol)
im hoping once i get my own place to take up falconry and eventually get my raptor rehab and release licencse but that one is a tough one to get, birds of prey are highly protected and getting your permits can be tough.
so, if someone calls me and says "i found a baby robin" ill give them the info i can give them, and give them the number of a rehabber who can help them...but im personally not going to demand they hand the animal over to me right now...thats not my job, my job is to inform them that keeping the animal would be illegal and not in its best interest and put them intouch with the person they need...
if that person calls and tells me they have a baby bat...its my duty to ask them to let me have it, and if they wont hand it over report them to the proper authorities...vector rehab is not a risk for normal people...
that being said though MANY rehabbers of the smalls (song birds, small mammals) generally animals not prone to imprinting and not prone to carrying serious diseses will often allow people to help raise the animal esepcially during busy times if the person is willing to act as an "aprentice" in otherwords raise the baby till "weaning" then the rehabber takes it in for the rehab portion of the job...
this can easily be done with rabbit, squirrel ect, and many song birds...

so while some rehabbers may be very adamant about you giving the animal over imediatly its typically only in cases where theres more risk to the person than the benefits to the animals wll being...
as rehabbers we get busy and overwhelmed and quite frankly im MORE than happy to share my knowledge and passion with anyone whos interested in getting involved in the right way...especially for the "pest vectors" not alot of people in these parts wiling to work with coys and bats in particular and skunks can be tough too...foxes are a little easier because they are "cute" but not by much as they are also quite stinky.... so the more people who ask me "what can i do" the better lol
Rate this post positively Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
Please register to post and access all features of our very popular forum. It is free and quick. Over $68,000 in prizes has already been given out to active posters on our forum. Additional giveaways are planned.

Detailed information about all U.S. cities, counties, and zip codes on our site: City-data.com.


Reply
Please update this thread with any new information or opinions. This open thread is still read by thousands of people, so we encourage all additional points of view.

Quick Reply
Message:


Over $104,000 in prizes was already given out to active posters on our forum and additional giveaways are planned!

Go Back   City-Data Forum > General Forums > Nature
Similar Threads
Follow City-Data.com founder on our Forum or

All times are GMT -6.

© 2005-2020, Advameg, Inc. · Please obey Forum Rules · Terms of Use and Privacy Policy · Bug Bounty

City-Data.com - Contact Us - Archive 1, 2, 3, 4, 5, 6, 7, 8, 9, 10, 11, 12, 13, 14, 15, 16, 17, 18, 19, 20, 21, 22, 23, 24, 25, 26, 27, 28, 29, 30, 31, 32, 33, 34, 35, 36, 37 - Top