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Old 01-13-2012, 09:03 AM
 
164 posts, read 168,180 times
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So is the consensus that a weakened ionsphere will not cause an increase in global warming?

I've seen articles that say that global warming can be attributed to an increase in solar activity.

Obviously, there are plenty of articles that refute that as well, but what is the truth?

Let's say for instance that the entire solar system is a delicately balanced arrangement of longitudinal EM radiation and there is a longitudinal connection between the earth and the sun which are both giant dipoles that emit energy.

It's not possible that a longitudinal event on earth could disrupt this balance and cause a havoc on earth?

Say for instance that the closed-loop longitudinal radiation exchange system of Earth-Sun could be inadvertently "tweaked" in the feedback loop from Earth to Sun, so that a large solar longitudinal resonance was stimulated.

In this case is it possible that the Sun could emit a resonance that would increase global temperature?

Now perhaps, my assumption is flawed because the ionsphere would not necessarily be weakened in this condition, but as I previously said, I'm not a scientist.

Are there any physicists on this forum that can break down why this would not happen?

And as far as a mechanism that could produce this, perhaps a natural occurance in the earth for whatever reason.

Again, the reason why I ask is because I've seen reports that an increase in solar activity may contribute to global warming.

Considering I've also read reports that the sun is getting cooler, I just assumed that perhaps the ionosphere was somehow weakening or being overutilized in some way.

Is this even possible?
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Old 01-13-2012, 11:30 AM
 
Location: Ohio
22,275 posts, read 15,649,107 times
Reputation: 18788
Quote:
Originally Posted by lkb0714 View Post
What would a large electromagnetic event be?
The only thing that comes to mind would be a Solar Flare in the X7-X9 Class.

Quote:
Originally Posted by lkb0714 View Post
What possible mechanism is there for ELF to breakdown the ionosphere?
None. ELF is non-ionizing.

Not ionizing....

Mircea

Quote:
Originally Posted by Kansarado View Post
Wat?

I don't even know what you're talking about.
There are two kinds of electromagnetic radiation: ionizing and non-ionizing.

Everything from UV (Ultra Violet light) to the right of the spectrum is ionizing radiation. That includes UV, gammas and X-rays, which are emitted by the Sun.

Everything to the left of UV light, which is all of your colors, then Infrared, then your radio waves starting with microwave, then radar, TV/FM, Shortwave and AM Radio.

Ionizing radiation begets ionizing radiation, meaning ionizing radiation in and of itself creates ionizing radiation. Non-ionizing radiation does not.

Quote:
Originally Posted by Kansarado View Post
So is the consensus that a weakened ionsphere will not cause an increase in global warming?
No, it will not.

Your atmosphere consists of the Troposphere, which is maybe 11 Miles from sea level to top, then a thin boundary that separates the Troposphere from the Stratosphere.

All weather takes place in the Troposphere only.

The Stratosphere occupies the next 25 miles or so, and then then boundary between the Stratosphere and the Mesosphere is the Ozone Layer. The Mesosphere occupies the next 35 to 40 miles and then starts the Thermosphere which is the same thing as the Ionosphere.

One thing you should instantly recognize, is that by the time you get to the Stratosphere, the air pressure is only ~10% of sea level. In other words, at standard temperature, the air pressure at sea level should be about 1 Atmosphere, and then at the Tropopause (the boundary between the Troposphere and Stratosphere) the air pressure is 0.1 Atmospheres.

So what can you say about the air pressure in the Ionosphere, and how would that affect the density of the Ionosphere?

Well, the Ionosphere is not very dense at all.

If you heated the Ionosphere, what would happen? We apply Boyle's Law which is the relationship between pressure, temperature and volume of a gas (and some liquids). Heating the Ionosphere should in theory cause the volume to expand, which would reduce its density. But to reduce the effect of the Ionosphere, you'd have to expand it quite a bit.

As the Earth moves through space, the outer atmosphere comes into contact with solar particles and creates a sort of magnetic shield that strips out most of the gammas and X-rays, but not so much UV light.

The Ionosphere is then ionized (and negatively charged) by these gammas, X-rays and UV light. That ionization interferes with radio communications, especially in the AM and Shortwave Bands, and to a lesser extent in the TV/FM (UHF/VHF/FM) Bands.

The Ozone Layer then strips out most, but not all of the UV, gammas and X-rays.

The remainder that reach Earth are part of the Natural Background Radiation, and the other half of that equation is radiation from the decay of radio-isotopes in the Earth's crust.

You should understand that Earth being as close to the Sun as it is will obviously affect temperature, but that will be rectified on December 21, 2012.

It's just coincidence that the Earth's Perigee will occur then. The Earth's orbit will be as circular as it gets, and we will be closer to the Sun than at any time in recorded history, and from that day forward, the Earth very, very slowly will start drifting away from the Sun into a more elliptical orbit.

That is part of the 100,000 year Mankovitch Cycle. In about 5,000 to 10,000 years glaciers will start driving Canadians out of Canada into the US, and we'll have to put up with their silliness.

Ionizing...

Mircea
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Old 01-13-2012, 08:34 PM
 
164 posts, read 168,180 times
Reputation: 90
Quote:
Originally Posted by Mircea View Post
The only thing that comes to mind would be a Solar Flare in the X7-X9 Class.



None. ELF is non-ionizing.

Not ionizing....

Mircea



There are two kinds of electromagnetic radiation: ionizing and non-ionizing.

Everything from UV (Ultra Violet light) to the right of the spectrum is ionizing radiation. That includes UV, gammas and X-rays, which are emitted by the Sun.

Everything to the left of UV light, which is all of your colors, then Infrared, then your radio waves starting with microwave, then radar, TV/FM, Shortwave and AM Radio.

Ionizing radiation begets ionizing radiation, meaning ionizing radiation in and of itself creates ionizing radiation. Non-ionizing radiation does not.



No, it will not.

Your atmosphere consists of the Troposphere, which is maybe 11 Miles from sea level to top, then a thin boundary that separates the Troposphere from the Stratosphere.

All weather takes place in the Troposphere only.

The Stratosphere occupies the next 25 miles or so, and then then boundary between the Stratosphere and the Mesosphere is the Ozone Layer. The Mesosphere occupies the next 35 to 40 miles and then starts the Thermosphere which is the same thing as the Ionosphere.

One thing you should instantly recognize, is that by the time you get to the Stratosphere, the air pressure is only ~10% of sea level. In other words, at standard temperature, the air pressure at sea level should be about 1 Atmosphere, and then at the Tropopause (the boundary between the Troposphere and Stratosphere) the air pressure is 0.1 Atmospheres.

So what can you say about the air pressure in the Ionosphere, and how would that affect the density of the Ionosphere?

Well, the Ionosphere is not very dense at all.

If you heated the Ionosphere, what would happen? We apply Boyle's Law which is the relationship between pressure, temperature and volume of a gas (and some liquids). Heating the Ionosphere should in theory cause the volume to expand, which would reduce its density. But to reduce the effect of the Ionosphere, you'd have to expand it quite a bit.

As the Earth moves through space, the outer atmosphere comes into contact with solar particles and creates a sort of magnetic shield that strips out most of the gammas and X-rays, but not so much UV light.

The Ionosphere is then ionized (and negatively charged) by these gammas, X-rays and UV light. That ionization interferes with radio communications, especially in the AM and Shortwave Bands, and to a lesser extent in the TV/FM (UHF/VHF/FM) Bands.

The Ozone Layer then strips out most, but not all of the UV, gammas and X-rays.

The remainder that reach Earth are part of the Natural Background Radiation, and the other half of that equation is radiation from the decay of radio-isotopes in the Earth's crust.

You should understand that Earth being as close to the Sun as it is will obviously affect temperature, but that will be rectified on December 21, 2012.

It's just coincidence that the Earth's Perigee will occur then. The Earth's orbit will be as circular as it gets, and we will be closer to the Sun than at any time in recorded history, and from that day forward, the Earth very, very slowly will start drifting away from the Sun into a more elliptical orbit.

That is part of the 100,000 year Mankovitch Cycle. In about 5,000 to 10,000 years glaciers will start driving Canadians out of Canada into the US, and we'll have to put up with their silliness.

Ionizing...

Mircea
I have no answers for this and I expect you answer with integrity, but I ask because I am concerned with the world, and I pray it becomes more livable for everyone, in a sustainable environment; however, my faith is luke warm and can be put aside in certain circumstances, this is why I struggle to find the answers even if my selfishness prevents me from doing anything when or if I receive the information.

I hope you are not selfish too.
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