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Old 03-31-2012, 09:52 PM
 
Location: Northeast Tennessee
7,305 posts, read 26,937,832 times
Reputation: 5517

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About .2 of a mile down the road from my house, starting every spring and all through the summer, there are random dead birds laying in the street in front of someones house. This has went on for about 4 years, but I just would shake my head out of disgust and go on, but its started already and I am tired of it. It used to only be Black birds, but today I noticed a dead Red Bird on the side of the road dead. I honestly think that that someone at that house is killing them. They dont have any cats that I know of (this is a rural area btw, but alot of houses/neighborhoods). There are only 2 people live in that house, both older people, but I dont see the old man out anymore, but i do the old woman, but she dont look that old... 50s-60s maybe? They are not very friendly people either. Her granddaughter/and her husband live behind her, so he could be the one doing it. They do set a garden in the spring and I think they are doing this to keep the birds out, but they dont realize the birds are eating pests.

I just am wondering if this is illegal and can I report it to the animal control center or something so they can investigate?

I am tired of dodging dead birds in the road every spring and winter in front of that house and what they are doing I think is cruel.
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Old 03-31-2012, 11:28 PM
 
8,679 posts, read 14,750,805 times
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Angry Grrrrrr!

That would make me angry, too.

I would start by calling the nearest Audubon Society, ornithological group, or even a local bird-watching group. If anyone knows the laws in your area, I'd think it would be them. They would also know the status of any diseases that might be affecting local avian populations, and could tell you who to talk to if you suspect that the birds are being shot or poisoned. You might also try the nearest SPCA.
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Old 03-31-2012, 11:59 PM
 
16,489 posts, read 23,610,324 times
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You don't know for sure the birds are being delibertly killed, but if they are that is against the law. You can call your local Fish and Game/Fish and Wildlife Service and they can test these birds and find out how they died and go from there.
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Old 04-01-2012, 08:41 AM
 
Location: Northern MN
3,869 posts, read 14,681,190 times
Reputation: 3610
We have a Starling trap. We remove them from the environment.
They transmit bacterial diseases and spread fowl pox to poultry and other livestock. Farmers suffer severe losses in animal feed and crops each month due to starling consumption and contamination.
They can eat tons of feed each year on the farm.
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Old 04-03-2012, 09:47 AM
 
Location: Jersey
870 posts, read 1,431,730 times
Reputation: 880
Quote:
Originally Posted by snofarmer View Post
We have a Starling trap. We remove them from the environment.
They transmit bacterial diseases and spread fowl pox to poultry and other livestock. Farmers suffer severe losses in animal feed and crops each month due to starling consumption and contamination.
They can eat tons of feed each year on the farm.
You put/bought your house in their natural habitat and you complain about them eating your feed? Do you know what a strain you put on your local environment, we arent picking you up and putting you on the moon.

I know it seems mean of me and humane of you, but you are catching birds in their local habitat and moving them to somewhere they dont know where they are. Either they can become disoriented and end up lost. They can die anyway or they find their way back.
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Old 04-03-2012, 11:01 AM
 
Location: Northern MN
3,869 posts, read 14,681,190 times
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" we arent picking you up and putting you on the moon."

I don't get it?

Starlings are an invasive species that can chase away native birds.
While European starlings are invasive, blackbirds are federally protected by United States law under the Federal Migratory Bird Treaty Act. They may not be killed unless they are actively damaging property or wildlife.
Starlings are an introduced species to America and have adapted well to urban life which offers abundant nesting and food sites.


The over population of one species becomes a problem for all concerned.
This puts a strain on all native birds in the area and costs farmers money this added cost is passed along to the consumer.

Many farms remove undesirable animals so you can have food and milk on your table.

When I say remove, I don't mean relocated, more along the lines of there next use will be that of fertilizer.

"humane"
Most of the time their demise is very quick

But I'm sure this is not what the op is concerned about.
Maybe the folks down the road ave a few cats that are good hunters.
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Old 04-03-2012, 04:00 PM
 
Location: Jersey
870 posts, read 1,431,730 times
Reputation: 880
Quote:
Originally Posted by snofarmer View Post
" we arent picking you up and putting you on the moon."

I don't get it?

Starlings are an invasive species that can chase away native birds.
While European starlings are invasive, blackbirds are federally protected by United States law under the Federal Migratory Bird Treaty Act. They may not be killed unless they are actively damaging property or wildlife.
Starlings are an introduced species to America and have adapted well to urban life which offers abundant nesting and food sites.


The over population of one species becomes a problem for all concerned.
This puts a strain on all native birds in the area and costs farmers money this added cost is passed along to the consumer.

Many farms remove undesirable animals so you can have food and milk on your table.

When I say remove, I don't mean relocated, more along the lines of there next use will be that of fertilizer.

"humane"
Most of the time their demise is very quick

But I'm sure this is not what the op is concerned about.
Maybe the folks down the road ave a few cats that are good hunters.
Oh so youre killing them....yeah shooting them is also a quick demise. Good thinking....better kill them, wouldnt want them to share the environment.
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Old 04-03-2012, 04:20 PM
 
Location: Visitation between Wal-Mart & Home Depot
8,307 posts, read 37,702,991 times
Reputation: 7175
Quote:
Originally Posted by Dave5150 View Post
You put/bought your house in their natural habitat and you complain about them eating your feed? Do you know what a strain you put on your local environment, we arent picking you up and putting you on the moon.

I know it seems mean of me and humane of you, but you are catching birds in their local habitat and moving them to somewhere they dont know where they are. Either they can become disoriented and end up lost. They can die anyway or they find their way back.
About 60 starlings were released into NYC's central park around the turn of the 20th century by a Briton who felt homesick and wanted something to remind him of home. By 1950 they had spread to the Pacific Northwest and all points in between. This isn't a species that has trouble with relocation.

They are a major problem for native cavity nesting birds and their success has been to the detriment of purple martins, bluebirds, sapsuckers, woodpeckers and a host of others. They represent an ecological disaster of biblical proportions.

Starlings are also one of about three bird species that enjoy ZERO federal or state protection in the U.S., along with rock dove and house sparrows (English sparrows).

I'm sorry that you are at odds with your neighbor, but (assuming your neighbor is indeed killing the birds) he or she is probably well within his or her rights unless there is a specific prohibition against the killing method in your area. In other words, you may be able to put a stop to shooting the birds with a pellet gun inside of city limits - but if he/she starts trapping and euthenizing them in a reasonable manner then that isn't likely to be actionable.

Now, if you're talking about a neighbor that is killing cardinals, robins, mockingbirds and jays - that's very, very different and is likely to bear very, very heavy fines. Get in touch with the game warden for your county/parish if that's the case.

Last edited by jimboburnsy; 04-03-2012 at 04:39 PM..
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Old 04-03-2012, 09:36 PM
 
Location: Northern MN
3,869 posts, read 14,681,190 times
Reputation: 3610
Quote:
Originally Posted by Dave5150 View Post
Oh so youre killing them....yeah shooting them is also a quick demise. Good thinking....better kill them, wouldnt want them to share the environment.
Nope, we don't shoot them that would be a waste of ammunition.

Quote:
wouldnt want them to share the environment
now you get it, just like we don't want to share our water ways "environment" with Asian carp, millfoil or zebra mussels.


Ps I know you were being sarcastic and snotty.
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Old 04-04-2012, 10:00 AM
 
Location: Near Nashville TN
7,201 posts, read 14,115,444 times
Reputation: 5442
Quote:
Originally Posted by Tennesseestorm View Post
I just am wondering if this is illegal and can I report it to the animal control center or something so they can investigate?

I am tired of dodging dead birds in the road every spring and winter in front of that house and what they are doing I think is cruel.
Yes! Report them to Animal Control, Wildlife Service and the Dept of Agriculture and the local police. The only birds in the USA you can legally kill are English Sparrows and European Starlings. The more places you report them to the better chance something will be done. Also, check a few of these dead birds and see if they show some kind of shot or bodily damage. The Dept of Ag can check them for poisons.
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