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Old 03-26-2013, 02:22 PM
 
Location: Victoria TX
42,662 posts, read 76,440,288 times
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Animals die of old age, and probably understand and accept that they are near death. As I recall, they try to find private places to expire, which partly explains why one rarely comes upon the remains of an animal that has died a natural death. The lethargic nature of your raccoon could suggest that it is dying of natural causes.
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Old 03-26-2013, 02:24 PM
 
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Maybe you should call animal control, have them check it out. Poor raccoon.
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Old 03-26-2013, 02:24 PM
 
Location: SE Michigan
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Quote:
Originally Posted by jtur88 View Post
Animals die of old age, and probably understand and accept that they are near death. As I recall, they try to find private places to expire, which partly explains why one rarely comes upon the remains of an animal that has died a natural death. The lethargic nature of your raccoon could suggest that it is dying of natural causes.
I thought this too, or that it might be sick/dying of distemper or a wound or something like that.

But still, if it's just an unlucky animal who is saveable, I figure I'll give it a chance.
Crap, now it's snowing. Oh well, the dog will appreciate a second visit to the lake, even if it's snowing!

Edit: AC will not do anything with wild animals here; they barely have enough money to handle dogs and cats. Nor will the DNR. And there are no active rehabbers in the county.
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Old 03-26-2013, 02:33 PM
 
Location: Washington, DC
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Can a raccoon climb out of a large, empty Dumpster?

I believe they can do whatever they set their minds to do.
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Old 03-26-2013, 03:30 PM
 
Location: SE Michigan
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Back to NE View Post
Can a raccoon climb out of a large, empty Dumpster?

I believe they can do whatever they set their minds to do.
LOL.

Well, we'll see! It was alert when I opened the lid, then curled into an obstinate ball. An animal version of "if I can't see you, you can't see me" I guess.
It now has cat food, water, an overripe apple and two old used 2x6 boards for egress.
So now it is up to the raccoon.
I sure hope that Dumpster is empty tomorrow morning.
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Old 03-26-2013, 06:30 PM
 
Location: Somewhere over the rainbow in "OZ "
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While at the Space Center in Florida for many years at night I would watch the raccoon population.. Raccoons are very inquisitive and very smart and are problem solvers on the fly. They found out late at night that if people did not turn off the automatic doors they could get into the building and loot every desk of snacks and left overs and trash cans full of left over food from the day. Which would create a new problem. Alligators love raccoons.. the raccoons would get into a building and some times be followed by a alligator..
Never corner a raccoon.. they will charge you with snarling teeth and a very aggressive grawl.. they will not back down. If they have a exit they will retreat..and if you have a dog door on your garage or patio make sure it's locked before going too bed..or you may have a late night visitor. Trapped in a large cubic dumpster... just place a old pallet or long board / limb in the dumpster..they will get out. Foaming at the mouth and shaking beware..most likely rabies.

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=pfwr-mYVJiw
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Old 03-26-2013, 06:48 PM
 
Location: SE Michigan
6,191 posts, read 15,868,964 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by TN Tin Man View Post
While at the Space Center in Florida for many years at night I would watch the raccoon population.. Raccoons are very inquisitive and very smart and are problem solvers on the fly. They found out late at night that if people did not turn off the automatic doors they could get into the building and loot every desk of snacks and left overs and trash cans full of left over food from the day. Which would create a new problem. Alligators love raccoons.. the raccoons would get into a building and some times be followed by a alligator..
Never corner a raccoon.. they will charge you with snarling teeth and a very aggressive grawl.. they will not back down. If they have a exit they will retreat..and if you have a dog door on your garage or patio make sure it's locked before going too bed..or you may have a late night visitor. Trapped in a large cubic dumpster... just place a old pallet or long board / limb in the dumpster..they will get out. Foaming at the mouth and shaking beware..most likely rabies.


Baby Raccoons Stealing Pizza - YouTube
Cute video.
In part because of my friendship with my wildlife rehabber friend I've become quite wised up on wild animal behaviour...I've helped her with several captures, a distemper-ridden-fox and many baby or injured animals. So for sure I know to be sensible around wildlife!

Story: About five years ago I was walking with one of my Rottweilers. A flurry in the trees along the edge of a river caught our attention...what I saw was three very baby raccoons clinging terrified to a branch at my eye level. What my dog saw was mama raccoon thrashing in the shallows, enticing my dog to chase. I assure you, my money would be on a 15 lb raccoon over a 100 lb Rottweiler! I called my dog off quickly but what I was later told: Adult raccoons will lure dogs or other large predators into water, then attack. Raccoons are adept in water, much moreso than larger prey. They can overpower and drown much larger aggressors.

So I definitely have respect for them, and in general think it is best for wild animals to stay wild.
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Old 03-26-2013, 09:13 PM
 
Location: southwest TN
8,289 posts, read 15,496,990 times
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When we lived on a national park in NYC, we had a terrible problem with raccoons who were no longer totally feral - they did not fear people and were often quite brash and comfortable around us. When we had BBQs that ran into the night, it was not unusual for a raccoon to come wandering into the yard to check out the trash can - WHILE WE WERE STILL THERE! It got to the point that if I was out at night, I had to beep the horn until my husband came out with garbage can lid and a rake to see me safely into the house. He thought I was a little over-afraid until one night.........

Actually, it was around 5 am, his usual time to get up, and as he approached the kitchen, he heard noises. As he turned to go into the kitchen, sitting on the counter was a very large raccoon. The bread drawer was open and the raccoon was eating a loaf of bread. Unfortunately, to get to that location, the raccoon had cleared off everything on the counters between the window screen it had sliced open and the bread drawer. Unfortunately, my husband had to pass by the raccoon to get to the back door and was afraid that the raccoon would venture further into the house, there not being a door between the kitchen and dining room. Brave man that he is, he grabbed a framed poster and used it to block the doorway while he ran to the outside door. He then grabbed that poster and herded the animal outside. Never again would I leave a window open regardless the heat. Screens are no defense.

And I bleached the entire kitchen, throwing out every ounce of food that was not in a sealed can or the refrigerator.

I view raccoons as evil creatures to be avoided as if they were rattlesnakes. But I still hope you were able to save that critter from being trapped in the dumpster.
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Old 03-26-2013, 09:25 PM
 
1,893 posts, read 1,222,687 times
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I bet it is an opposum. My cats go in and out of my dumpster all the time, it has a pretty light plastic lid. I am pretty sure a raccoon would get out very easily.
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Old 03-27-2013, 05:16 AM
 
Location: SE Michigan
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Quote:
Originally Posted by chronic65 View Post
I bet it is an opposum. My cats go in and out of my dumpster all the time, it has a pretty light plastic lid. I am pretty sure a raccoon would get out very easily.
Trust me, I know the difference between a possum and a raccoon.
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