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Old 04-20-2013, 09:45 AM
 
Location: Victoria TX
42,662 posts, read 76,349,359 times
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One of the great delights when traveling, is looking at and identifying wildflowers. Take a few minutes to pull down a country road, where you can walk along the roadside, and look at the wildflowers that grow there.

It's useful to have a field guide for identification of wildflowers, but there is no really useful one that covers the whole continent. Local wildflowers books exist for every part of the country, which are sold at the bookshops in state parks, national parks and wildlife refuges, as well as the regular bookstores in the respective states. In every region, there are far too many flowers that have only local distribution, that would be fairly common locally, but not even shown in general wildflower guides. Some flowers can be fairly common in a range of just a few counties.

It is considered a faux pas to collect any specimens, and even illegal, but if they are abundant in a local area, it does no harm to save one. They keep nicely when pressed between the pages of a book printed on non-glossy paper. If so inclined, they make nice souvenirs of where you have traveled. Alternatively, you can photograph them closeup and save the photos of your trip.

For field identification, remember that the leaves and stems are diagnostic, and the blossom might not be, so concentrate on the green parts to match against the ID in your book. Be careful not to go onto private property. Landowners can be very fussy, and in some states, trespassing is a very serious crime.
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Old 04-20-2013, 03:02 PM
 
Location: Southern New Hampshire
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When I clicked on this thread, I was looking forward to seeing some photos of wildflowers.
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Old 04-20-2013, 05:26 PM
 
Location: Somewhere over the rainbow in "OZ "
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Road side flowers are the best. But you need too be careful snakes and broken glass or sharp object you can't see. Taking photo's is the best way for identification. And State Parks the rangers will gladly help in identification.

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Old 04-20-2013, 06:22 PM
 
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I love wild flowers! I don't know what most of them are but I sure do like looking at them.


Quote:
Originally Posted by TN Tin Man View Post
Road side flowers are the best. But you need too be careful snakes and broken glass or sharp object you can't see. Taking photo's is the best way for identification. And State Parks the rangers will gladly help in identification.
Gorgeous flower with butterfly! I like taking pics and not wandering through the fields.
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Old 04-20-2013, 07:57 PM
 
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Spring ephemeral wildflowers are in bloom in much of the eastern and southeastern forests right now - don't dally; catch a glimpse of them while you can before they're gone for another year. Wakerobin, purple, white, and yellow violets, toothwort, spring beauties, twinfleaf, bloodroot, trout lily, Jacob's ladder, Virginia bluebells, rue anemone, meadow rue, Dutchman's breeches, squirrel corn, corn salad, mayapple, dwarf larkspur, saxifrage and golden ragwort are in bloom in my woods right now. Probably more as well that I haven't spotted yet... and definitely several more to come.

But please don't pick wildflowers - it is illegal on most public lands to pick wildflowers, as some varieties are endangered or rare, so unless you are on private property with the property owner's knowledge and permission, take or draw pictures or just enjoy these fleeting beauties as they are, where they are - and leave them to set seed for next year's season (it takes up to seven years for wakerobin [red trillium] to reach maturity and bloom).
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Old 04-20-2013, 08:35 PM
 
Location: Somewhere over the rainbow in "OZ "
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Here in Tennessee they have a "FREE" special program in the spring at the State Parks a free Wild Flower walk conducted by the park ranger and a botanist sight - smell - taste are part of the 1-2 hour hike. If visiting any State Parks in your area check and see if they have a similar program great for young and old.

Butter Fly Pea about the size of a half dollar.
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Old 04-21-2013, 12:41 PM
 
Location: Chapel Hill, N.C.
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Once you identify wildflowers grown by the state in patches on the interstate you will know what will grow in your own yard with very little effort.Here in N.C. and in many southern states there are incredibly beautiful patches (some miles long) of wildflowers. These parcels are marked off with stakes so the areas are not mowed and the flowers are allowed to reseed for next year.
If you don't know what you are looking at you can get in touch with your state's highway department for a list of flowers and locations. Just Google your states DOT- wildflowers and you will find a wealth of information. Here are just two sites for N.C. When I travel I print out DOT info for the states we will be going through to better be able to identify wildflowers. We can thank the late Lady Bird Johnson for fostering the use of wildflowers along highways. Texas indeed has a beautiful display for Blue Bonnets and other natives to that part of the country.

http://polk.ces.ncsu.edu/awaywithwildflowers/

http://www.ncdot.gov/doh/operations/...ildflowerbook/
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Old 04-21-2013, 02:48 PM
 
Location: Somewhere over the rainbow in "OZ "
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Most states have a agriculture department that will give you information on indigenous wild flowers and some will give you information on were you can find bulk seeds too plant.
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Old 04-22-2013, 04:42 AM
 
6,441 posts, read 4,558,244 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by no kudzu View Post
Once you identify wildflowers grown by the state in patches on the interstate you will know what will grow in your own yard with very little effort.Here in N.C. and in many southern states there are incredibly beautiful patches (some miles long) of wildflowers. These parcels are marked off with stakes so the areas are not mowed and the flowers are allowed to reseed for next year.
If you don't know what you are looking at you can get in touch with your state's highway department for a list of flowers and locations. Just Google your states DOT- wildflowers and you will find a wealth of information. Here are just two sites for N.C. When I travel I print out DOT info for the states we will be going through to better be able to identify wildflowers. We can thank the late Lady Bird Johnson for fostering the use of wildflowers along highways. Texas indeed has a beautiful display for Blue Bonnets and other natives to that part of the country.

A Way with Wildflowers | North Carolina Cooperative Extension

NCDOT Wildflower Program
Lady Bird sure did love wildflowers, especially the Blue Bonnets. Although it's not illegal to pick Blue Bonnets from an open area (no gates opened or fences climbed), the Texas DOT includes: The department is pleased with the attention wildflowers attract; however, we discourage picture-taking that damages the flowers. If too many wildflowers are trampled, they will die and not go to seed. Since many of these flowers are annuals, this means they have to go to seed to come back the next year. Naturally, we discourage picking the flowers for the same reason.
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Old 04-22-2013, 05:42 PM
 
Location: Somewhere over the rainbow in "OZ "
24,054 posts, read 23,602,189 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Dallas Kitty View Post
Lady Bird sure did love wildflowers, especially the Blue Bonnets. Although it's not illegal to pick Blue Bonnets from an open area (no gates opened or fences climbed), the Texas DOT includes: The department is pleased with the attention wildflowers attract; however, we discourage picture-taking that damages the flowers. If too many wildflowers are trampled, they will die and not go to seed. Since many of these flowers are annuals, this means they have to go to seed to come back the next year. Naturally, we discourage picking the flowers for the same reason.
Most Federal Parks as in the Great Smokey Mountains it's illegal too pick any flora or fauna. You can be fined.
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