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Old 05-10-2013, 05:52 AM
 
Location: Chapel Hill, N.C.
36,497 posts, read 45,474,954 times
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We have a small bridged pond in our neighborhood and everybody enjoys taking stale bread to feed them. I've given bread to waterfowl my whole life. I never stopped to think about the consequences of my actions. This is very interesting.

Stop Feeding Waterfowl - NYS Dept. of Environmental Conservation
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Old 05-10-2013, 06:46 AM
Status: "The 2nd most Interesting Man" (set 18 hours ago)
 
Location: DFW - Coppell / Las Colinas
35,298 posts, read 38,758,600 times
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Doesn't this apply to the human animal also:

Quote:
Unnatural Behavior

Waterfowl can rapidly become conditioned to, and dependent on, handouts. Fed ducks and geese behave differently. They become more aggressive and eventually lose their wariness of humans. Some will not survive because they can't compete.
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Old 05-10-2013, 09:29 AM
 
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An old saying goes 'a fed bear is a dead bear', as bears that are fed by humans typically lose their fear of humans and begin to act aggressively toward humans and become dependent on it. As per the article, it seems that waterfowl have the same problem. I think it goes for just about any animal.
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Old 05-10-2013, 12:56 PM
Status: "The 2nd most Interesting Man" (set 18 hours ago)
 
Location: DFW - Coppell / Las Colinas
35,298 posts, read 38,758,600 times
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Aren't we suppose to stop putting bird seed in feeders come fall to encourage migration ?
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Old 05-10-2013, 07:15 PM
bjh
Status: "I know y'all are getting sick of me. :D" (set 8 hours ago)
 
Location: Memphis - home of the king
35,732 posts, read 24,661,667 times
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Good web page.
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Old 05-10-2013, 07:31 PM
 
Location: Philaburbia
33,068 posts, read 61,890,891 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Rakin View Post
Aren't we suppose to stop putting bird seed in feeders come fall to encourage migration ?
Not all birds migrate: cardinals, finches, titmice, nuthatches, etc. The little juncoes that summer in northern Canada migrate to my area (around Philadelphia) in the winter and feast on seeds. Birds that migrate to the subtropics and tropics (robins, orioles, hummingbirds etc.) need a food source -- insects, worms, fish, nectar etc. -- that isn't available once it gets cold.

I know people that put out mealworms etc. in the fall for migrating birds from the north who might be a little behind schedule.
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Old 05-11-2013, 09:21 AM
Status: "chickpea soup" (set 25 days ago)
 
18,762 posts, read 56,499,738 times
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The author of the article may be a little slow, or may not be giving fully accurate reasons.

1. Interbreeding between domestic and wild might be a problem for racist ducks and fanciers of rare breeds, but in general interbreeding results in a more robust population.

2. Overcrowding. Living on one of the migration flight paths, it is common to see places like Lake Guntersville speckled black with huge populations of ducks. That is a natural situation where little or no feeding occurs - to support that size population, people would have to be bringing grain trucks and dumping.

3. The comments about overpopulation of ducks and in the same article comments about the absence of safe places for them and the die-off seem to be at odds with each other.

The underlying issues are more likely to be too many ducks on golf courses and in swimming areas, which can affect the economies of the areas. Couching such complaints in eco-friendly terms is more likely to get some people on the bandwagon to stop feeding ducks.
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Old 05-11-2013, 10:09 AM
 
Location: Tennessee
35,391 posts, read 34,806,034 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by no kudzu View Post
We have a small bridged pond in our neighborhood and everybody enjoys taking stale bread to feed them. I've given bread to waterfowl my whole life. I never stopped to think about the consequences of my actions. This is very interesting.

Stop Feeding Waterfowl - NYS Dept. of Environmental Conservation
The most ignored sign in my town used to be one at the lake that said to please stop feeding the waterfowl because it encourages overpopulation. I used to take photos of the birds in the winter because those are the months we get seagulls to add to the ducks and geese. People would come with their kids and their bread, cheese balls, etc. and feed them. The kids loved it. The adults loved it. Toss the bread up in the air, the seagulls would fly up and catch it. Like I said, most ignored sign in town. Last year they replaced the old signs with new ones. The new one said, Bread Kills Waterfowl! Don't feed them bread and to use the feeder machines instead. They installed the dispensers when they put up the new signs. I suppose the feeder machines have some kind of pellet food.

I was very suspicious at first so I looked it up and bread really isn't good for them. Well, why didn't they say that in the first place instead of all of that overpopulation bs no one cared about?

I feed them red grapes. The grapes are meant for the seagulls (when they are here), robins and mockingbirds but the geese eat them, too. The ducks and geese also scoff up birdseed meant for the song birds so I put that on a half pole above their reach. People go to the machines now and buy the pellets or whatever is in them and feed the ducks and geese but I don't see the same enthusiasm from the kids, the adults or even the waterfowl. I also don't see the numbers of people coming to feed them. Instead of telling people what they can't feed them they should tell them what they can feed them. People like the idea of bringing food to them at the lake.

P.S. Our ducks and geese are here all year long. Only the gulls come in the winter so it was only the gulls the overpopulation sign was meant for.
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Old 05-11-2013, 11:21 AM
 
Location: West Virginia
12,769 posts, read 32,853,952 times
Reputation: 8618
That's what I try to tell people that feed any wildlife yr round. They get dependant then die when people don't feed them. My bird feeders go up November and put away early spring. That way migrating birds are gone. And all birds teach the must needed in the wild survival skills.
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Old 05-11-2013, 01:05 PM
bjh
Status: "I know y'all are getting sick of me. :D" (set 8 hours ago)
 
Location: Memphis - home of the king
35,732 posts, read 24,661,667 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by LauraC View Post
The most ignored sign in my town used to be one at the lake that said to please stop feeding the waterfowl because it encourages overpopulation. I used to take photos of the birds in the winter because those are the months we get seagulls to add to the ducks and geese. People would come with their kids and their bread, cheese balls, etc. and feed them. The kids loved it. The adults loved it. Toss the bread up in the air, the seagulls would fly up and catch it. Like I said, most ignored sign in town. Last year they replaced the old signs with new ones. The new one said, Bread Kills Waterfowl! Don't feed them bread and to use the feeder machines instead. They installed the dispensers when they put up the new signs. I suppose the feeder machines have some kind of pellet food.

I was very suspicious at first so I looked it up and bread really isn't good for them. Well, why didn't they say that in the first place instead of all of that overpopulation bs no one cared about?

I feed them red grapes. The grapes are meant for the seagulls (when they are here), robins and mockingbirds but the geese eat them, too. The ducks and geese also scoff up birdseed meant for the song birds so I put that on a half pole above their reach. People go to the machines now and buy the pellets or whatever is in them and feed the ducks and geese but I don't see the same enthusiasm from the kids, the adults or even the waterfowl. I also don't see the numbers of people coming to feed them. Instead of telling people what they can't feed them they should tell them what they can feed them. People like the idea of bringing food to them at the lake.

P.S. Our ducks and geese are here all year long. Only the gulls come in the winter so it was only the gulls the overpopulation sign was meant for.
Corn. Bring them the type of corn feed stores sell for domestic ducks.
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