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Old 08-02-2013, 11:19 AM
 
Location: God's Country
5,188 posts, read 3,777,241 times
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even though one, African cape buffaloes, have monumental chips on their shoulders. But because the species are different, it's not like mating rights were at stake.

At any rate, his choice of a partner in this death dance suggests that Mr. buffalo's macho juices were flowing big time.

Warning: graphic

Rhino V Buffalo fight of the titans HQ by jaandil7 - YouTube
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Old 08-02-2013, 12:04 PM
 
55,004 posts, read 43,847,441 times
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You'd be surprised to know that sometimes animals behave badly and some are just jerks.

Killings can be about food or water resources, personal space, just being in a bad mood....lotsa reasons.

They had young male elephants in one African game park killing rhinos for a while.

I've seen a show on bear researchers in Alaska talking about one male grizzly in the area that was just a psycho and all the other bears stayed away from him and the researchers always kept an eye out for him and gave him vastly more space than the other bears.

Its an interesting topic.
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Old 08-02-2013, 01:35 PM
 
Location: God's Country
5,188 posts, read 3,777,241 times
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[quote=Mathguy;30783207]You'd be surprised to know that sometimes animals behave badly and some are just jerks.

Killings can be about food or water resources, personal space, just being in a bad mood....lotsa reasons.

They had young male elephants in one African game park killing rhinos for a while. quote]

Yes, I recall the show. The jumbos were rescued orphan juveniles. They sought out the rhinos and "kneeled" on them, crushing them. The narrator blamed it on the fact that as orphans, they didn't have the benefit of parental guidance on how to behave.

Pachydermal Childhood Psychology 101?
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Old 08-02-2013, 01:45 PM
 
Location: God's Country
5,188 posts, read 3,777,241 times
Reputation: 8689
Quote:
Originally Posted by Mathguy View Post
You'd be surprised to know that sometimes animals behave badly and some are just jerks.

Killings can be about food or water resources, personal space, just being in a bad mood....lotsa reasons.

They had young male elephants in one African game park killing rhinos for a while.

I've seen a show on bear researchers in Alaska talking about one male grizzly in the area that was just a psycho and all the other bears stayed away from him and the researchers always kept an eye out for him and gave him vastly more space than the other bears.

Its an interesting topic.
Hear what you're saying but if I were a buffalo, I wouldn't be tangling with a 5,000 lb. white rhino or even a smaller guy from the black rhino group who altho smaller are said to be more aggressive, or high strung, than the white rhino.

I'd pick on a 12-lb. dik dik antelope.
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Old 08-05-2013, 09:08 AM
 
Location: Orange County, CA
3,727 posts, read 5,423,308 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Mathguy View Post
They had young male elephants in one African game park killing rhinos for a while.
Quote:
Originally Posted by Calvert Hall '62 View Post

Yes, I recall the show. The jumbos were rescued orphan juveniles. They sought out the rhinos and "kneeled" on them, crushing them. The narrator blamed it on the fact that as orphans, they didn't have the benefit of parental guidance on how to behave.

Pachydermal Childhood Psychology 101?
Just like humans, when elephants lack adult supervision and role models they behave badly. In this case, the problem was solved when a few mature bulls were captured and imported from other areas. These big bulls took no nonsense from the errant young males, and quickly disiplined them and brought them into line and taught them how an elephant should behave. The rhino killings then stopped for good.
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Old 12-19-2015, 01:20 PM
 
Location: God's Country
5,188 posts, read 3,777,241 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by BlackShoe View Post
Just like humans, when elephants lack adult supervision and role models they behave badly. In this case, the problem was solved when a few mature bulls were captured and imported from other areas. These big bulls took no nonsense from the errant young males, and quickly disiplined them and brought them into line and taught them how an elephant should behave. The rhino killings then stopped for good.

Yeah, nothing tangles with an adult African bull elephant except for another bull and, of course, humans.
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