U.S. CitiesCity-Data Forum Index
Go Back   City-Data Forum > General Forums > Nature
 [Register]
Please register to participate in our discussions with 2 million other members - it's free and quick! Some forums can only be seen by registered members. After you create your account, you'll be able to customize options and access all our 15,000 new posts/day with fewer ads.
View detailed profile (Advanced) or search
site with Google Custom Search

Search Forums  (Advanced)
Reply Start New Thread
 
Old 08-19-2013, 04:03 PM
 
Location: Swiftwater, PA
18,711 posts, read 16,536,056 times
Reputation: 14640

Advertisements

My mother was showing me her garden today and we spotted this on one of her tomato plants. My feeling is that the caterpillar did not lay the eggs on itself. So am I wrong or can you identify the insect responsible for laying the eggs on the caterpillar? Some of the eggs are loose on that mat that I used to take the picture.

Rate this post positively Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message

 
Old 08-21-2013, 02:00 PM
 
Location: California
6,272 posts, read 7,096,891 times
Reputation: 13627
Wasps will lay their eggs inside a caterpiller so that when they hatch they eat it from the inside out. However, I don't know what wasp eggs look like so I can't say that is what is going on here. It looks more like white flies to me.
Rate this post positively Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
 
Old 08-21-2013, 03:09 PM
 
Location: Under the Redwoods
3,751 posts, read 7,314,912 times
Reputation: 6105
Catapillars are 'babies' and cannot lay eggs. They must first become a moth or butterfly, then they are mature and able to lay eggs.
It is hard to tell what sort of insect layed those eggs. Many insect eggs look pretty much the same. I would say that it is probably some sort of larger fly, like, but not neccissarily a horse fly.
Rate this post positively Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
 
Old 08-21-2013, 03:11 PM
 
Location: League City, Texas
2,919 posts, read 5,574,284 times
Reputation: 6250
That's a very sad tomato hornworm.
Rate this post positively Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
 
Old 08-21-2013, 03:13 PM
 
Location: Swiftwater, PA
18,711 posts, read 16,536,056 times
Reputation: 14640
Quote:
Originally Posted by Heidi60 View Post
Wasps will lay their eggs inside a caterpiller so that when they hatch they eat it from the inside out. However, I don't know what wasp eggs look like so I can't say that is what is going on here. It looks more like white flies to me.
Thanks for your guess! I don't have a clue what did this. Maybe that is why some butterflies are disappearing? I should have hatched them to find out. But I gave the caterpillar and eggs to my chickens - they made short work of both. The tomato plant had withered under the caterpillar. I don't know if that was from the caterpillar - the plant also had some tomato blight.

Hopefully somebody knows what this is?
Rate this post positively Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
 
Old 08-21-2013, 03:16 PM
 
Location: Swiftwater, PA
18,711 posts, read 16,536,056 times
Reputation: 14640
Quote:
Originally Posted by OwlKaMyst View Post
Catapillars are 'babies' and cannot lay eggs. They must first become a moth or butterfly, then they are mature and able to lay eggs.
It is hard to tell what sort of insect layed those eggs. Many insect eggs look pretty much the same. I would say that it is probably some sort of larger fly, like, but not neccissarily a horse fly.
That is what I always thought. If you are right about horseflies; that could effect many butterflies?
Rate this post positively Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
 
Old 08-21-2013, 03:18 PM
 
Location: League City, Texas
2,919 posts, read 5,574,284 times
Reputation: 6250
The caterpillar is a tomato hornworm. They will eat your tomatoes down to nubs. Notice how they are the same color as the tomato leaves? And they leave giant black poop on the plant.
They don't become butterflies, but are giant hawk moths!
Rate this post positively Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
 
Old 08-21-2013, 03:21 PM
 
Location: Kanada ˁ˚ᴥ˚ˀ
124,858 posts, read 17,621,526 times
Reputation: 72435
I found this....could that be it?

Rate this post positively Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
 
Old 08-21-2013, 05:46 PM
 
Location: Swiftwater, PA
18,711 posts, read 16,536,056 times
Reputation: 14640
Quote:
Originally Posted by Almrausch View Post
I found this....could that be it?

You have the winning number! Too bad my chickens also ate the wasp eggs! Thanks!
Rate this post positively Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
 
Old 08-21-2013, 07:32 PM
 
Location: Under the Redwoods
3,751 posts, read 7,314,912 times
Reputation: 6105
Quote:
Originally Posted by fisheye View Post
That is what I always thought. If you are right about horseflies; that could effect many butterflies?
Probably not. This is what is called a host situation. The catapillar is the host to another creature.
Most 'hostings' are species specific.
Rate this post positively Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
Please register to post and access all features of our very popular forum. It is free and quick. Over $68,000 in prizes has already been given out to active posters on our forum. Additional giveaways are planned.

Detailed information about all U.S. cities, counties, and zip codes on our site: City-data.com.


Reply
Please update this thread with any new information or opinions. This open thread is still read by thousands of people, so we encourage all additional points of view.

Quick Reply
Message:

Over $104,000 in prizes was already given out to active posters on our forum and additional giveaways are planned!

Go Back   City-Data Forum > General Forums > Nature

All times are GMT -6. The time now is 10:38 AM.

© 2005-2023, Advameg, Inc. · Please obey Forum Rules · Terms of Use and Privacy Policy · Bug Bounty

City-Data.com - Contact Us - Archive 1, 2, 3, 4, 5, 6, 7, 8, 9, 10, 11, 12, 13, 14, 15, 16, 17, 18, 19, 20, 21, 22, 23, 24, 25, 26, 27, 28, 29, 30, 31, 32, 33, 34, 35, 36, 37 - Top