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Old 11-27-2013, 10:35 PM
 
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I'm looking for a forest with certain parameters, and I'd like your help in finding photos of it. First, it has to be very dense, like with the trees in the way, you can't see very far ahead of you, including above you. second, the trees can't be thin and short, I'm looking for big glorious trees here. Third, the trees must be leafy green, so the southwest I guess is out. I greatly appreciate any help here. Thanks.
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Old 11-28-2013, 08:52 AM
 
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You're up against the logistics of nature here. With deciduous trees you usually get a big crown and a wide root net, which means nothing much grows underneath except for shrubs, so dense forests with deciduous trees becomes a relative concept. Oak woods and beech woods in Europe would come closest to your description, but the older and thicker the trees, the more space between them. Now for conifer trees, that's different. You can have wonderfully dense forests with thick trunks, such as the pine forests n the Northwest mountains, but they won't be leafy! Are you looking for a place to live with dense forest, or something like a picture for a school project?
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Old 11-28-2013, 09:13 AM
 
Location: S.W.PA
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In my opinion, the lowcountry forests of the the south east US- from the James River area in Va down thru NC, SC, GA, and into Florida are as dense as you can find. These aren't the straight and narrow forest trees that you have in say PA or NY, but rather gnarly broad trees . Look up photos of Live Oak trees for an idea of what I mean.
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Old 11-28-2013, 02:57 PM
 
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So you guys are saying aside from the southeast, what I'm looking for doesn't exist in the US?
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Old 11-29-2013, 12:40 AM
 
Location: in a rocker on the porch.
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Quote:
Originally Posted by circa81 View Post
So you guys are saying aside from the southeast, what I'm looking for doesn't exist in the US?
You might find what you are looking for along the Kangamangus Highway in N.H..
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Old 11-29-2013, 05:39 AM
 
Location: Swiftwater, PA
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Originally Posted by tamiznluv View Post
You might find what you are looking for along the Kangamangus Highway in N.H..

Southern Maine also has very dense forest.

I always wondered why the forest were so dense and lush in those Northeastern states. Down here, in PA, much of our forest is thin and we have a good amount of dead wood. I speculated that maybe the gypsy moths were not as bad in colder areas or they do not get hit as hard with acid rain?
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Old 11-29-2013, 10:41 AM
 
Location: Pennsylvania
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are you looking for just photos?

There's a Maine photo topic under the Maine forum. Awesome photos!

Might also check the photography forum. They have different topics, one might be forests-I know there's one for trees.
or are you looking for someplace to go? I'd try northern Maine, western PA, maybe Alaska.
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Old 11-29-2013, 11:41 AM
 
35,285 posts, read 43,452,606 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by circa81 View Post
I'm looking for a forest with certain parameters, and I'd like your help in finding photos of it. First, it has to be very dense, like with the trees in the way, you can't see very far ahead of you, including above you. second, the trees can't be thin and short, I'm looking for big glorious trees here. Third, the trees must be leafy green, so the southwest I guess is out. I greatly appreciate any help here. Thanks.
I'll assume your quest is for a future photo op.
Google has many images of forests,find the one that most fits your ideal then find out where it is and plan a trip there.
https://www.google.ca/search?safe=ac...65.92ZpMunEbmg
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Old 11-29-2013, 01:16 PM
 
Location: SC
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Quote:
Originally Posted by circa81 View Post
So you guys are saying aside from the southeast, what I'm looking for doesn't exist in the US?
I am no tree expert, but up east and into Ohio, Michigan etc., you have a lot of newer growth forests, so the trees would not be large enough, and the part of not being able to see far ahead of you would be due to new growth and under brush, not the trees themselves. I think this is due to most of it being logged out at some point in history.

There are some old growth virgin forests around the NE where you will get the massive trees, but they tend to form a high canopy and there is not much left underneath for density, other than a lot of ferns and moss. Unless you count the fog that old growth creates underneath near the ground in the morning. There is one virgin forest I know of in western Pa, where I camped, but I forgot the name of the park.

What about the Pacific NW? And lowland regions of the SE?
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Old 11-29-2013, 04:53 PM
 
Location: in a rocker on the porch.
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Quote:
Originally Posted by fisheye View Post
Southern Maine also has very dense forest.

I always wondered why the forest were so dense and lush in those Northeastern states. Down here, in PA, much of our forest is thin and we have a good amount of dead wood. I speculated that maybe the gypsy moths were not as bad in colder areas or they do not get hit as hard with acid rain?
Very true and there's also Acadia National Park in Maine also.
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