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Old 02-13-2014, 10:35 AM
 
Location: Vegas
1,789 posts, read 1,855,653 times
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ScienceDaily: @ Cities support more native biodiversity than previously thought -- ScienceDaily

http://images.sciencedaily.com/2014/...2950-large.jpg

Quote:
The rapid conversion of natural lands to cement-dominated urban centers is causing great losses in biodiversity. Yet, according to a new study involving 147 cities worldwide, surprisingly high numbers of plant and animal species persist and even flourish in urban environments -- to the tune of hundreds of bird species and thousands of plant species in a single city.
I'm always amazed how Nature adapts. Man has done a lot of things like reducing feed for Monarch Butterflies bringing about their possible extinction. But, it seems that Nature always seems to bounce back.
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Old 02-13-2014, 10:48 AM
 
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Yep, bounced back like the Dodo bird, Great Auk, and Passenger Pigeon!
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Old 02-14-2014, 01:08 AM
bjh
Status: "Stop the panic! It is not necessary." (set 2 days ago)
 
Location: Memphis - home of the king
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One of the happy things about cities is that there is some wildlife. But nature is NOT infinite. Some of the damage that's been done is permanent.
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Old 02-14-2014, 06:15 AM
 
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Quote:
Originally Posted by sargentodiaz View Post
But, it seems that Nature always seems to bounce back.
Baloney. While a few animal species can live and even thrive in an urban environment, we're still seeing the greatest extinction of species since the dinosaurs. Unfortunately, Man has still not learned how to live on this planet without destroying essential natural habitat and the wildlife that depends on it. Unless we curtail the human population there is little hope for the future.
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Old 02-14-2014, 07:17 AM
 
Location: RI, MA, VT, WI, IL, CA, IN (that one sucked), KY
37,921 posts, read 27,302,916 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by sargentodiaz View Post
But, it seems that Nature always seems to bounce back.

Not always. Some species are very adaptable, many others aren't.

Many of the species that are adaptable and prevalent in urban environments are edge species and disturbance dependent species. The forest interior species (such as many warblers) aren't flourishing in urban environments, and never will.
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