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Old 04-18-2014, 09:06 AM
 
514 posts, read 438,132 times
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super kewl video, thanx for sharing....
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Old 04-18-2014, 02:24 PM
 
Location: Orange County, CA
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Excellent for rodent control. Much cheaper and safer than traps or poison. Owls prey almost exclusively on small rodents, with an occasional bird or bunny.
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Old 04-18-2014, 04:41 PM
bjh
Status: "Keep calm and carry on." (set 5 days ago)
 
Location: Memphis - home of the king
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Originally Posted by BlackShoe View Post
Excellent for rodent control. Much cheaper and safer than traps or poison. Owls prey almost exclusively on small rodents, with an occasional bird or bunny.
Yes! When most of the predators were killed off in many western states the rodent population, including rabbits, skyrocketed and they wondered why.

Here's some footage from Australia. It looks just like the footage from the US that I've seen. It's give you an idea of why we should NOT eradicate or harm the coyote and other predators like owls. If we do, we're a bunch of morons.

Mice infestation ---v

Mouse Plague - Swarms of Mice - YouTube
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Old 04-18-2014, 04:56 PM
bjh
Status: "Keep calm and carry on." (set 5 days ago)
 
Location: Memphis - home of the king
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Rabbits were a problem, too.

Kansas, 1930s vv

Rabbit Drives, 1934. Kansas Emergency Relief Committee. - YouTube
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Old 04-20-2014, 09:15 AM
 
Location: Orange County, CA
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Originally Posted by bjh View Post
Yes! When most of the predators were killed off in many western states the rodent population, including rabbits, skyrocketed and they wondered why.
It works the same way with the larger predators. In some states deer populations have grown so large that they are now a nuisance, "Rats with antlers" as they are sometimes sarcastically referred to. When there are few or none cougars, wolves, bears, coyotes, or bobcats to check deer numbers, populations go way up.
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Old 04-20-2014, 11:47 AM
 
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Originally Posted by BlackShoe View Post
Excellent for rodent control. Much cheaper and safer than traps or poison. Owls prey almost exclusively on small rodents, with an occasional bird or bunny.
Except when they're eating cats.

I do NOT love me some owls, because I know too much about them from living in a rural area with a large owl population. They're interesting and their different hoots are cool to hear, but they are hell on cats. I didn't even like walking my dog at night because the owls would get close and watch us. I do wish they were better at catching bats, though.

But if you're into owls, come to Houston, MN to the International Festival of Owls, which happens every March: Festival Home. It was astounding how many people showed up from all over the country this year! They're also working on building an "International Owl Center".
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Old 04-20-2014, 04:52 PM
 
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For the person who rep/wrote me that I should keep my cats inside, I DO KEEP MY OWN CATS INSIDE!

Durrr.

The owls murder the cats that idiots dump out in the country.
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Old 04-20-2014, 05:09 PM
 
Location: Los Angeles>Little Rock>Houston>Little Rock
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That was awesome! I love owls so much. When I was a young teen we were on vacation on Catalina Island, CA. We went on an inland motor tour and at one point I saw a pair of dwarf owls sitting on a log right next to the road. It was amazing.
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Old 04-20-2014, 09:04 PM
bjh
Status: "Keep calm and carry on." (set 5 days ago)
 
Location: Memphis - home of the king
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Quote:
Originally Posted by BlackShoe View Post
It works the same way with the larger predators. In some states deer populations have grown so large that they are now a nuisance, "Rats with antlers" as they are sometimes sarcastically referred to. When there are few or none cougars, wolves, bears, coyotes, or bobcats to check deer numbers, populations go way up.
Yep, large or small herbivores overeat the vegetation, if there aren't enough carnivores to keep their numbers in check. Once they've eaten away their natural veg diet they start getting into human territory trying to find more food. Then they can wind up spreading disease, Lyme from deer, and though some don't realize it, rodents can still spread plague.
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Old 04-21-2014, 08:44 AM
 
Location: Orange County, CA
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Originally Posted by 601halfdozen0theother View Post
Except when they're eating cats.
Quote:
Originally Posted by 601halfdozen0theother View Post
The owls murder the cats that idiots dump out in the country.
The raptor experts say that owls get a bad rap on this, and the logic behind their reasoning makes me agree. The average Great Horned Owl only weighs 3 1/2 pounds, with a rare big one going 4. A healthy adult cat is double or triple this weight. Predators have a high sense of risk/reward, and to attack another predator much larger than itself puts it at very high risk of being badly injured or killed. An owl with a broken wing or maimed foot is a dead owl, it is doomed, and the owl knows it. Kittens of course are another matter, but the dead cats blamed on owls quite likely were killed by another larger predator; coyote, bobcat, wolf, cougar, or perhaps even a large raccoon. Golden eagles most surely are a threat, a 13 pound female is big and strong enough to take cats and foxes.
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