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Old 04-23-2014, 06:28 PM
 
1,176 posts, read 2,149,611 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by fisheye View Post
I agree. But it also depends on the personality of some animals; even groundhogs or moose. I had a next door neighbor that lost a German Shepard to a groundhog years ago. It was one lucky lunge by the groundhog that scored the aorta in the neck of the Shepard.

We encountered a huge bull moose standing in the road up by Moosehead Lake. We were in a red Chevrolet Lumina and even knowing that deer are color blind; we did not want to take any chances (we were not sure if moose were color blind?). I had our car in reverse and were ready to do a speedy retreat. Cars and moose don't mix.

PS Whether she was licensed or not licensed; I am not crazy about people shooting warning shots into the air. We have no idea how close they were to civilization or other humans. I would be happier with shots discharged into the ground at a 45% or less angle - just for safety sake. There could be a state law about discharging a weapon without a "safe" backstop? I really did not look up New Hampshire laws.
I had the EXACT same thought.
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Old 04-23-2014, 06:58 PM
 
Location: Orange County, CA
3,727 posts, read 5,423,308 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by MJ7 View Post
I'm sort of upset that the moose was just a calf, people need to learn a lesson. Are people really this crass?
The sad part is if the man shot and killed the moose it would have been justified. Where's the justice in stalking an animal until it gets upset and charges you, then you kill it and say it was the mooses' fault?
A big bull would have been double the weight of that animal, even more aggressive, and the results might have far more severe, with both people killed or badly hurt. A .22 pistol, which is what I assume the woman carried, is not something you want to shoot a moose with, even a small one. Unless she made a very lucky brain hit, the moose could have taken the entire clip without going down, becoming more enraged, and living long enough to inflict major damage. She was wise not to shoot it, perhaps about the only smart thing that couple did.
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Old 04-24-2014, 03:45 AM
bjh
Status: "I know y'all are getting sick of me. :D" (set 8 hours ago)
 
Location: Memphis - home of the king
35,732 posts, read 24,661,667 times
Reputation: 124721
Quote:
Originally Posted by fisheye View Post
I agree. But it also depends on the personality of some animals; even groundhogs or moose. I had a next door neighbor that lost a German Shepard to a groundhog years ago. It was one lucky lunge by the groundhog that scored the aorta in the neck of the Shepard.

We encountered a huge bull moose standing in the road up by Moosehead Lake. We were in a red Chevrolet Lumina and even knowing that deer are color blind; we did not want to take any chances (we were not sure if moose were color blind?). I had our car in reverse and were ready to do a speedy retreat. Cars and moose don't mix.

PS Whether she was licensed or not licensed; I am not crazy about people shooting warning shots into the air. We have no idea how close they were to civilization or other humans. I would be happier with shots discharged into the ground at a 45% or less angle - just for safety sake. There could be a state law about discharging a weapon without a "safe" backstop? I really did not look up New Hampshire laws.
The aorta or the jugular? Aorta is deep in the chest. Jugular is in the neck and animals often go for their opponent's throat.
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Old 04-24-2014, 05:20 AM
 
Location: Swiftwater, PA
15,894 posts, read 12,695,051 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by bjh View Post
The aorta or the jugular? Aorta is deep in the chest. Jugular is in the neck and animals often go for their opponent's throat.
Your right! I got them mixed up. It was the jugular. The groundhog would need pretty long teeth to reach the aorta.

I witnessed that Shepard groundhog fight many years ago. The dog went after the groundhog and then the groundhog turned and went after the dog. I had to tell the neighbor his dog was dead.
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