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Old 01-31-2017, 05:40 AM
 
Location: LI,NY zone 7a
2,217 posts, read 1,323,935 times
Reputation: 2703

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Okay, okay! How much longer do I have to sit in this dang corner!? I apologize for not paying complete, and full attention in my schooling years. To think, I could have had a PHD in all things known to man if I had. Anybody else feel the need to jump on board to show your superiority, be my guest. I would think if one recognized the complaint, and humbled himself with an apologetic reply, that would be it. But alas it is quite the feature on open forums to flex one's muscles, and feel self righteous in doing so.

My sincere apologies to the OP.
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Old 02-01-2017, 08:15 AM
 
5,936 posts, read 9,738,180 times
Reputation: 6265
Quote:
Originally Posted by Seahawksfan33 View Post
There is an evil European Hornets nest by my apartment, and they keep flying near me! I saw somebody trying to feed them though, and they didn't get stung for some reason. Are they aggressive?
Wasps/hornets are fairly easily killed wth a battery-powered bug zapper, the kind that looks like a tennis racket. They are not fast flyers, and our "slow" human reaction time is enough to anticipate the wasps' flight path. The giant European hornet (over 2 inches, yes) is a different matter. I took out two of them inside a summer cottage a few years ago, and I had to stun them with the zapper and then crush them. The zapper wasn't powerful enough to kill them. I briefly considereed keeping them as pets and training them . They are really nasty! I don't want them to suffer, but I don't want future trouble with them, ether.

If you're thinking of exteminating a hive, I suggest you get professional help, or wait until dusk when the wasps are quiet. I'm ususlly fine with a live-and-let-live attitude in nature, but if a wasp's nest is close to the house we take it out.

But...are you bothered by a big wasp nest this time of year?
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Old 02-01-2017, 12:33 PM
 
875 posts, read 1,268,596 times
Reputation: 1745
Quote:
Originally Posted by Zoisite View Post
Sorry but I just have to say this, especially here in the Nature Forum, because this is something I have a big bee in my bonnet about.

There is no such thing as a nasty bee. There never was and never will be a nasty bee.

I wish people would stop referring to hornets and wasps as bees. All it does is promote continued ignorance in already ignorant people who think bees and wasps and hornets are all the same thing that need to be killed and it gives a bad reputation to innocent bees which bees do not deserve.

Please don't do it.

.
I'm assuming that since you are quite particular about wording, that you are aware that the word 'nasty' means ill-tempered, irritable or highly unpleasant.

I'm also assuming that, considering the execution of your response and your enthusiasm in sternly correcting LIcenter, you must have extensive knowledge of the order Hymenoptera.

Considering your expertise, I assume that in stating that there never was and never will be a nasty bee, your oversight of the African honey bee (Apis mellifera ssp. scutellata) was intentional.

As you already know, this species of bee is much more aggressive in foraging behavior because of its evolution in the arid lands of Africa where food resources are scarcer. Also, I'm sure that you already know that because of its evolution in lands where food is scarce, plus its co-evolution with the bee eater, honey badger, and a variety of robbing behaviors of other bees, that the African honey bee colony has several unique adaptations in the defense of its nest. The African honey bee proliferates at a much higher rate than the European honey bee, and the worker bees are tremendously sensitive to any perceived disturbance outside of the nest. As you also know, the number of guard bees is much greater in a colony of A.m. scutellata, and the alarm pheromone release is much greater, deploying a larger number (about 3X more) of bees than a colony of European honey bees would. The subject of disturbance is stung 8-10x more than they would had they disturbed a colony of European honey bees, and, reflective of the co-evolution with the honey badger, the bees will chase the subject for up to a mile (I’m aware that you already knew all of this). You are also aware that this aggression can be exacerbated by stressors in the environment such as dryness and temperature, resulting in these bees randomly swarming and sometimes killing a subject that moves within the vicinity of their nest (even if the subject never touches it). This, even the experts agree, qualifies as nasty.

One thing is for sure, and that is that we are fortunate to have folks like yourself here on the nature forum who will come by and straighten us out once in a while. Thanks for your input!
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Old 02-02-2017, 06:10 AM
 
248 posts, read 133,940 times
Reputation: 406
Quote:
Originally Posted by LIcenter View Post
Okay, okay! How much longer do I have to sit in this dang corner!? I apologize for not paying complete, and full attention in my schooling years. To think, I could have had a PHD in all things known to man if I had. Anybody else feel the need to jump on board to show your superiority, be my guest. I would think if one recognized the complaint, and humbled himself with an apologetic reply, that would be it. But alas it is quite the feature on open forums to flex one's muscles, and feel self righteous in doing so.

My sincere apologies to the OP.
My admiration for your muscles and very sorry you missed out on all of those PHD's. I am not admonishing. Keep flexing your muscles.
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Old 02-02-2017, 07:22 AM
bg7
 
7,697 posts, read 8,599,528 times
Reputation: 15152
Quote:
Originally Posted by NJmmadude View Post
I'm assuming that since you are quite particular about wording, that you are aware that the word 'nasty' means ill-tempered, irritable or highly unpleasant.

I'm also assuming that, considering the execution of your response and your enthusiasm in sternly correcting LIcenter, you must have extensive knowledge of the order Hymenoptera.

Considering your expertise, I assume that in stating that there never was and never will be a nasty bee, your oversight of the African honey bee (Apis mellifera ssp. scutellata) was intentional.

As you already know, this species of bee is much more aggressive in foraging behavior because of its evolution in the arid lands of Africa where food resources are scarcer. Also, I'm sure that you already know that because of its evolution in lands where food is scarce, plus its co-evolution with the bee eater, honey badger, and a variety of robbing behaviors of other bees, that the African honey bee colony has several unique adaptations in the defense of its nest. The African honey bee proliferates at a much higher rate than the European honey bee, and the worker bees are tremendously sensitive to any perceived disturbance outside of the nest. As you also know, the number of guard bees is much greater in a colony of A.m. scutellata, and the alarm pheromone release is much greater, deploying a larger number (about 3X more) of bees than a colony of European honey bees would. The subject of disturbance is stung 8-10x more than they would had they disturbed a colony of European honey bees, and, reflective of the co-evolution with the honey badger, the bees will chase the subject for up to a mile (I’m aware that you already knew all of this). You are also aware that this aggression can be exacerbated by stressors in the environment such as dryness and temperature, resulting in these bees randomly swarming and sometimes killing a subject that moves within the vicinity of their nest (even if the subject never touches it). This, even the experts agree, qualifies as nasty.

One thing is for sure, and that is that we are fortunate to have folks like yourself here on the nature forum who will come by and straighten us out once in a while. Thanks for your input!
Thank you for perpetuating this, even though we are taking about bees in the US. Perhaps you don't realize how many people kill bees thinking bees and wasps are the same. The point of the discussion, as any one with four wings can see, is to disabuse people of that notion.


As if bees in the US already didn't have enough problems. Let the bee/wasp confusion continue with the negative killing consequences therefrom. Great. Thanks for your great input!
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Old 02-02-2017, 09:34 AM
 
875 posts, read 1,268,596 times
Reputation: 1745
Quote:
Originally Posted by bg7 View Post
Thank you for perpetuating this, even though we are taking about bees in the US. Perhaps you don't realize how many people kill bees thinking bees and wasps are the same. The point of the discussion, as any one with four wings can see, is to disabuse people of that notion.


As if bees in the US already didn't have enough problems. Let the bee/wasp confusion continue with the negative killing consequences therefrom. Great. Thanks for your great input!
I'm confused! Can you go back and quote where in this thread it was stated that this discussion was strictly about bees in the United States, and where in my post it was stated that bees and wasps were the same thing? I'm also curious where it was stated by me that any bee, wasp, or hornet be killed.


I'm grateful to have people on this board who are as passionate about the conservation of our (U.S.) honeybees as you are. I am also concerned about their welfare and aware of how beneficial (and benevolent) they are. Although being killed by individuals is problematic and it shouldn't be happening, I've always viewed CCD as a much greater threat to our honeybees. What are your thoughts on CCD?


Since we're advocating for our four-winged friends, I think that wasps and hornets are underrepresented in this fight. Wasps and hornets are also beneficial insects and also should not be killed. Have you thought about disabusing people of that notion as well?


Here's a post from another thread that I made regarding the benefits of wasps (the thread was mostly ill-natured towards wasps and I spoke up in their defense):


Quote:
Originally Posted by NJmmadude View Post
Wasps provide crop and garden pest control (by predation and parasitism), and also act as pollinators. Without them we could be overrun with insects that would decimate our crops. I'll take wasps over huge amounts of chemical pesticides (which would probably be much less effective anyway) any day of the week.

Why Do We Need Wasps?
Looking forward to hearing your thoughts!
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Old 02-12-2017, 11:19 PM
 
Location: St. Louis, Missouri
403 posts, read 488,540 times
Reputation: 256
Apparently hornets can eat yellow jackets and bees, so maybe they will scare them off (which I won't complain about). Afterall, they seem to be at least slightly less nasty than yellow jackets are (which are sadistic enough to sting people for no reason, and believe that they are entitled to wreck havoc at our barbeques/picnics). I will see how this plays out.
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Old 02-13-2017, 09:49 AM
 
4,804 posts, read 3,225,459 times
Reputation: 9769
I get those huge European hornets in my yard as well. They are very aggressive. They are so big they will knock against my window loud enough that I'll hear them from the other room. They dive at us when we're outside and they scare the grandkids.

A well timed swing with a badminton racket can knock them to the ground and then a quick finish. Or, you could scoop it into a container and relocate it.

If those hornets ate stinkbugs, I would let them stay.
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Old 02-13-2017, 04:12 PM
 
Location: Heart of Dixie
12,446 posts, read 11,584,169 times
Reputation: 28249
Quote:
Originally Posted by KaraG View Post
I get those huge European hornets in my yard as well. They are very aggressive. They are so big they will knock against my window loud enough that I'll hear them from the other room. They dive at us when we're outside and they scare the grandkids...
Are you sure you're not talking about Cicada Killers???? They act aggressive, and they'll fly at you, but they don't sting.
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Old 02-13-2017, 05:15 PM
 
4,804 posts, read 3,225,459 times
Reputation: 9769
Quote:
Originally Posted by Dirt Grinder View Post
Are you sure you're not talking about Cicada Killers???? They act aggressive, and they'll fly at you, but they don't sting.
You are right, they are the Cicada killers. At first we thought they were the European hornets, thanks for reminding me! Any tips on getting rid of them?
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