U.S. CitiesCity-Data Forum Index
Covid-19 Information Page
Go Back   City-Data Forum > General Forums > Nature
 [Register]
Please register to participate in our discussions with 2 million other members - it's free and quick! Some forums can only be seen by registered members. After you create your account, you'll be able to customize options and access all our 15,000 new posts/day with fewer ads.
View detailed profile (Advanced) or search
site with Google Custom Search

Search Forums  (Advanced)
 
Old 03-27-2017, 05:27 PM
 
12,942 posts, read 5,951,028 times
Reputation: 22844

Advertisements

Is there a consensus about this? I believe the latest theory is that they were over hunted by humans. Yet bison, moose and elk thrived in the millions even though they were a prime food and fur source for people in North America. Also, large mammals in Africa continued to thrive including rhinos and elephants.
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message

 
Old 03-27-2017, 05:57 PM
 
Location: Pennsylvania
17,207 posts, read 11,040,467 times
Reputation: 31092
not sure of the official reason but all the large mammals you mentioned are vegetarians. Maybe there was more plant life and less prey for carnivores?


Or maybe all the carnivores had high cholesterols and died of heart attacks.
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
 
Old 03-27-2017, 08:37 PM
 
Location: Omaha, Nebraska
8,319 posts, read 4,789,508 times
Reputation: 21753
As you noted, only some species of large fauna died off. It's likely that the climate changed the weather and the types of vegetation growing enough that, added to already existing human hunting pressures, the reproductive rate fell below what was sustainable, causing those species to become extinct.
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
 
Old 03-28-2017, 10:34 AM
 
875 posts, read 1,267,451 times
Reputation: 1745
There are some schools of thought that climate change (only) caused the die-offs, there are schools of thought that it was human-generated, and there are schools of thought that are in the middle.


This may be of interest:




https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Pleistocene_rewilding


https://biology.unm.edu/fasmith/Web_...20Am%20Nat.pdf
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
 
Old 03-28-2017, 01:33 PM
 
Location: Type 0.7 Kardashev
10,576 posts, read 7,625,882 times
Reputation: 37555
Quote:
Originally Posted by marino760 View Post
Is there a consensus about this? I believe the latest theory is that they were over hunted by humans. Yet bison, moose and elk thrived in the millions even though they were a prime food and fur source for people in North America. Also, large mammals in Africa continued to thrive including rhinos and elephants.
1) That not every species of megafauna was hunted to extinction does not mean that that was not the primary cause of the disappearance of others. After all, there are analogs of species such as the carrier pigeon, the Tasmanian wolf, and the dodo doesn't disprove that they were killed off by humans.

2) In reality, there are a number of contributing factors. Human predation is clearly the primary one, however, as it is the only consistent factor in megafauna extinction that happened during different time periods in different places - Australia, Japana, North American, South America not long after, Madagascar and New Zealand more recently, and many other examples.

3) As for Africa, the reason there is that the megafauna evolved together with human beings. For most of human history, technological advancement was extremely slow. Stone tools were improved slightly, and then were static for tens or hundreds of thousands of years. Species could adapt to the increasingly effect human ability to prey upon them. But in Australia, North America, etc., humans suddenly arrived with a whole suite of advanced tools and developed hunting techniques that allowed them to eliminate entire species is relatively short time frames in evolutionary terms - ie, a few thousand years.
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
 
Old 03-28-2017, 04:32 PM
 
7,823 posts, read 2,411,576 times
Reputation: 6992
Quote:
Originally Posted by marino760 View Post
Is there a consensus about this? I believe the latest theory is that they were over hunted by humans. Yet bison, moose and elk thrived in the millions even though they were a prime food and fur source for people in North America. Also, large mammals in Africa continued to thrive including rhinos and elephants.
No viable national health care system then.
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
 
Old 04-11-2017, 02:03 AM
 
Location: Boston
4,063 posts, read 1,675,762 times
Reputation: 6410
Quote:
Originally Posted by marino760 View Post
Is there a consensus about this? I believe the latest theory is that they were over hunted by humans. Yet bison, moose and elk thrived in the millions even though they were a prime food and fur source for people in North America. Also, large mammals in Africa continued to thrive including rhinos and elephants.
Same as with neanderthals, they went down an evolutionary path for which there was no way back, the climate they had adjusted to changed and they were caught holding the bag.
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
Please register to post and access all features of our very popular forum. It is free and quick. Over $68,000 in prizes has already been given out to active posters on our forum. Additional giveaways are planned.

Detailed information about all U.S. cities, counties, and zip codes on our site: City-data.com.


Reply
Please update this thread with any new information or opinions. This open thread is still read by thousands of people, so we encourage all additional points of view.

Quick Reply
Message:

Over $104,000 in prizes was already given out to active posters on our forum and additional giveaways are planned!

Go Back   City-Data Forum > General Forums > Nature
Follow City-Data.com founder on our Forum or

All times are GMT -6.

© 2005-2020, Advameg, Inc. · Please obey Forum Rules · Terms of Use and Privacy Policy · Bug Bounty

City-Data.com - Archive 1, 2, 3, 4, 5, 6, 7, 8, 9, 10, 11, 12, 13, 14, 15, 16, 17, 18, 19, 20, 21, 22, 23, 24, 25, 26, 27, 28, 29, 30, 31, 32, 33, 34, 35 - Top