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Old 07-10-2017, 01:25 AM
 
Location: Southern New Hampshire
7,601 posts, read 13,412,071 times
Reputation: 23976

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Quote:
Originally Posted by banjomike View Post
Eagles snatching cats is far from a common occurrence. But nature is nature; any predator will go after unwary game.

A cat is no different from an eagle in this regard. That kitty could have just as easily preyed on the eaglets as become lunch for them.

Don't feel sorry for the cat, nor hate the bird. The cat hung around with humans because it was in its own advantage to do so. Cats and birds can both feel affection for the humans who take care of them, but neither needs that affection to survive; both are quite capable of survival on nature's terms, not ours.
I understand nature, and I wouldn't have had the same response if it had been a feral animal eating another feral animal, but this was someone's PET, and I DO feel horrible for the cat (not so much for its idiot human, who should have known better!!). What I don't understand is people who live in areas where there are known predators (hawks, eagles, coyotes) who STILL let their cats go outside ... then are somehow shocked when the kitty disappears.
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Old 07-10-2017, 04:45 AM
 
Location: Idaho
2,692 posts, read 2,511,237 times
Reputation: 5682
Small dogs also make nice meals.
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Old 07-10-2017, 07:44 AM
 
4,315 posts, read 2,782,071 times
Reputation: 7724
Quote:
Originally Posted by f5fstop View Post
Small dogs also make nice meals.


so do little piglets


A farm neighbor commented on how nice it was to see a bald eagle in a tree near his farm building.


However, a sow was outside with her 10 little piglets and everyday there were less piglets.
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Old 07-10-2017, 09:38 AM
 
Location: Idaho
2,692 posts, read 2,511,237 times
Reputation: 5682
Bacon....YES!
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Old 07-10-2017, 12:09 PM
 
Location: A safe distance from San Francisco
9,478 posts, read 6,635,930 times
Reputation: 9932
Quote:
Originally Posted by karen_in_nh_2012 View Post
But how will a fence keep a hawk or eagle away? They could be scooped up as you watch, since you don't let them out of your sight. And you would be heartbroken.

OP, that was a horrible story, and I'm appalled at the at the end. Pretty sick.
So was I....very inappropriate.
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Old 07-14-2017, 07:31 AM
 
Location: San Diego
38,093 posts, read 34,114,636 times
Reputation: 22276
Our cats are too big and fat to be cargo We did lose one to a yote many years back.
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Old 07-14-2017, 07:55 AM
 
Location: Virginia
4,816 posts, read 2,489,181 times
Reputation: 13762
Quote:
Originally Posted by karen_in_nh_2012 View Post
But how will a fence keep a hawk or eagle away? They could be scooped up as you watch, since you don't let them out of your sight. And you would be heartbroken.

OP, that was a horrible story, and I'm appalled at the at the end. Pretty sick.
As I said, I don't let the cats out of my sight. If a hawk or another bird of prey flies onto the fence or into the surrounding shrubs, I scare them away by banging on the back door and going outside. I don't expect the fence to deter the birds; however, it does deter the cats from going in the bigger yard for the short amount of time that they're out there. Usually my big cat will start crying to come in within 5 minutes, and the smaller one (who goes out infrequently) immediately goes under the back steps anyway, where it's safe.
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Old 08-23-2017, 11:26 AM
 
Location: Boonies of N. Alabama
3,024 posts, read 2,602,554 times
Reputation: 5548
Quote:
Originally Posted by David A Stone View Post
I wished some of the feral cats near me would get carried away.
Ha.. I hear ya.
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Old 08-23-2017, 12:23 PM
 
16,719 posts, read 15,513,020 times
Reputation: 41248
Quote:
Originally Posted by Montana Griz View Post
Ok, mother nature can be cruel, however, look at it this way:.......How many more of our wonderful wild Gamble Quail chicks will grow up to adulthood and help keep the grasshopper numbers in check in late August........plus the young baby Eaglets will have some nourishing high protein meat for several meals.
That's what happens when you have an "outdoor cat". Hope he learned a lesson.
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Old 08-26-2017, 12:59 PM
 
Location: Eugene, Oregon
10,269 posts, read 3,539,172 times
Reputation: 15436
Quote:
Originally Posted by Montana Griz View Post
A new neighbor that moved here (from NY) about 3/4 mile from my place, just found out that house cats don't last very long when left outside unaccompanied by a human.
He said he let the cat out the front door about half hour after sun up and went back out about 30 minutes later to let the cat back in the house.

Here is what he saw in the front yard about 5 feet from a ornamental Bird Bath that is 34 inches in height.........

A Golden Eagle as tall as the Bird Bath, with his cat in the eagle's talons and at that moment, taking off .....for never to be seen again.

Ok, mother nature can be cruel, however, look at it this way:.......How many more of our wonderful wild Gamble Quail chicks will grow up to adulthood and help keep the grasshopper numbers in check in late August........plus the young baby Eaglets will have some nourishing high protein meat for several meals.
The unfortunate pet was probably a housecat and knew nothing of survival outdoors. My tough cats would never let a predator get near them. They have to dodge great horned owls all the time and dive for cover, whenever one comes slipping into a nearby tree. They stay hidden for hours, when that happens. When they are up on the roof, I know that a coyote has been around.

Once, I heard loud yelps of pain from the yard. My big tomcat was standing there, his fur all on end. A coyote had torn a 3-inch patch of skin and fur from his back, but he'd sunk his teeth and claws into the coyote's face and changed its mind about making a meal of him. My cat learned from that experience and made sure he wasn't caught in that position again. His skin closed-in around the wound, like a drawstring pulling tight and within two weeks, the hole was gone. That's necessary for an animal with fur, as if new skin grew across the wound, it wouldn't have hair on it.
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