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Old 08-06-2017, 09:29 PM
 
Location: Tennessee
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I had a yellow butterfly land on my friend's yellow tee-shirt and wouldn't fly away for the longest time. Just wondering if butterfly's can see color's.
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Old 08-06-2017, 09:41 PM
 
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I think they can...and they love yellow. They congregate on my lantana. I think they also love purple.

https://www.colormatters.com/color-m...mals-see-color
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Old 08-08-2017, 03:14 PM
 
Location: on the wind
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I would have to research more, but would think they have color vision. They would need to locate their nectar sources, and plants that rely on pollinators have developed brightly attractive color to do so (as well as shape, odor, and pheromones of course). There are parts of the visible color spectrum humans can't detect that pollinator insects can too. There are species that only visit specific plant species so that would also argue for color vision.
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Old 08-08-2017, 04:34 PM
 
Location: Heart of Dixie
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Butterflies can't see red, but they can see in the ultraviolet range. They have compound eyes, so they can't focus on an object.
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Old 08-08-2017, 05:34 PM
 
Location: on the wind
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Dirt Grinder View Post
Butterflies can't see red, but they can see in the ultraviolet range. They have compound eyes, so they can't focus on an object.
Red? That's interesting...so many flowers are red, but could be ultraviolet making up the red color we can see. Well, there are many other pollinators out there.
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Old 08-08-2017, 08:39 PM
 
Location: Heart of Dixie
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Quote:
Originally Posted by AllisonHB View Post
Red? That's interesting...so many flowers are red, but could be ultraviolet making up the red color we can see. Well, there are many other pollinators out there.
Apparently, different species of butterflies can sense different ranges of colors (including red). Some species are red-green color blind and others aren't. So, I guess the correct answer depends on which species we are talking about.
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Old 08-09-2017, 03:31 PM
 
Location: on the wind
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Dirt Grinder View Post
So, I guess the correct answer depends on which species we are talking about.
Isn't that always the question? Thanks for the info!
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Old 08-10-2017, 04:32 AM
 
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I truly do enjoy all of the interesting questions. Also realize many do enjoy answering with the help of modern technology and wonder why there are even these type of forums as anyone can look things up.

Much like hummingbirds are more attracted to red so people start adding red food coloring thinking this is the way to have more-by now most know that the red dyes are damaging to the liver of a hummingbird.

As different butterflies are attracted to different colors and species of plants... Want more butterflies do research on which plants different species lay their eggs on and also which butterflies are indigenous to your area.

GMO's are harmful to our pollinators. I have a small area and I do not use chemicals and after 5 years the pollinators are returning.

Mayhap ought to have started a new thread. Apologies for veering off topic. Composter once again dismounting soapbox.

I do find this nature thing interesting.
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Old 08-11-2017, 01:18 PM
 
Location: Heart of Dixie
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Quote:
Originally Posted by composter View Post
...Also realize many do enjoy answering with the help of modern technology and wonder why there are even these type of forums as anyone can look things up...
I answered, as it relates to my college studies, and I never answer a question on a subject I don't understand. Simply "looking things up" may yield an answer, but it doesn't guarantee an understanding. In human terms, a butterfly is actually blind, as it cannot focus on an object. However, the photoreceptors within the butterflies eyes allow for specialized color sensitivity, even into the UV range. This color sensitivity differs among butterfly species; some species are truly red-green color blind, while others rely on the ability to sense red.
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Old 08-11-2017, 08:57 PM
 
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The best way to have butterflies around is having host plants for baby caterpillar. Here I use passionflower and aristolochia. Also citrus trees. I've encountered new butterflies landing on me with moist wings, they aren't ready for flight long term yet. They find a bright tall perch which looks stable in the sun to dry the wings.

So a butterfly with moist wings is at the mercy of whatever post they can find until the mechanics are operational. These are very delicate, the flight apparatus. Like a sailor on the sea in a sail boat says "any port in a storm"
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