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Old 08-25-2017, 05:05 PM
 
Location: WMHT
3,487 posts, read 3,456,804 times
Reputation: 4467

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Quote:
Originally Posted by jbgusa View Post
On the East Coast coyotes are believed to have hybridized with wolves. No one knows for sure what the sex lives of these wild creatures are. Coyotes are not typically pack animals but wolves are.
Genetic testing has confirmed significant interbreeding with gray wolves as the coyote moved back East, see Assessment of coyote-wolf-dog admixture and genomics of wolf-like canids.

After being absent since the last ice age, our new Eastern coyote is heavier, with more wolf-like hunting and social behavior than their pint-sized Western cousins. The biggest coyote shot in New Hampshire this year was 55 pounds, 11 ounces, and that's not even close to an all-time record for the region.
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Old 08-26-2017, 12:25 PM
 
Location: on the wind
9,643 posts, read 4,284,240 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Pyewackette View Post
However bats are the critter most likely to carry rabies - but fortunately in the continental US people are seldom exposed to bats.
An important correction to this....bats are not usually silent carriers of the rabies virus. When they are infected they are actively ill and die quickly. They don't have the energy reserves that permit them to blunder around sick very long. Your chances of being bitten by a RABID bat as opposed to a healthy bat are very small. People try to justify random eradication of bats because they are rabies vectors...it is largely unwarranted. Bat colonies can carry other more common diseases that would be a concern for people in the USA; leptospirosis and histoplasmosis.
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Old 08-28-2017, 07:58 PM
 
Location: Southern California
6,222 posts, read 8,698,393 times
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Interesting & informative posts guys.

Well, not that this matters much, but I probably won't be walking there for a while. But, I know, a day could pass or a year could pass & I may see another coyote again.
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Old 08-28-2017, 08:22 PM
 
Location: WMHT
3,487 posts, read 3,456,804 times
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Wink Coyotes in captivity may live as long as 18 years

Quote:
Originally Posted by Forever Blue View Post
Interesting & informative posts guys.
Well, not that this matters much, but I probably won't be walking there for a while. But, I know, a day could pass or a year could pass & I may see another coyote again.
Or the same coyote, even in the wild they live +6 years.
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Old 08-28-2017, 09:13 PM
 
Location: West Coast U.S.A.
664 posts, read 273,410 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by fisheye View Post
Our coyotes on the East Coast are larger than the ones on the West Coast.
That's because they've been crossing with wolves in some parts of the Northeastern U.S.
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Old 08-28-2017, 10:18 PM
 
Location: Las Vegas
14,138 posts, read 26,180,374 times
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I see coyotes quite often. They live in the city of Las Vegas. I am in a very urban area and they are here. I think they eat rodents and we have lots of rabbits. They keep the population down. Every now and they I see a big lizard too but that's about it.
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Old 08-28-2017, 10:30 PM
 
Location: Approximately 50 miles from Missoula MT/38 yrs full time after 4 yrs part time
2,309 posts, read 3,474,894 times
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. Every now and they I see a big lizard too but that's about it.[/quote]

Gila Monster: 18 to 24 inches.....Poisenous....not a friendly lizard......some live in L V area.
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Old 08-29-2017, 05:53 AM
 
Location: New York Area
18,466 posts, read 7,307,961 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Montana Griz View Post
Gila Monster: 18 to 24 inches.....Poisenous....not a friendly lizard......some live in L V area.
Is there any evidence that coyotes eat Gila Monsters?
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Old 08-29-2017, 02:19 PM
 
Location: colorado springs, CO
6,355 posts, read 2,875,535 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by MsMetal View Post
Oops, meant to quote, not rep. Yes, there are wolves in CO again. One was accidentally killed in 2015.

Gray wolf population increasing in Colorado | FOX31 Denver

Wolves are already headed for Colorado. Let

That said, the woman who stopped Cos_Christi's daughter, had 99.99999% seen a group of coyotes. Wolves are even more rare than mountain lions here. Coyotes on the other hand, are all over the year, in small numbers & in packs, thousands, everywhere. They're not exactly a surprise to those of us who spend any time outdoors or paying attention :-) I wonder if that woman had just moved to the area? Out of towners are often not used to our proximity to wild life &/or the lack of danger the animals pose.
Yes; I'm positive the woman didn't understand what she was seeing! Especially as the girls had been outside our house a few weeks ago talking with their friends in their cars & came in saying "Hey mom; we just saw coyotes in Gary's yard!"

They were only 10 during the summer of the Waldo Canyon fire but remember the post-fire "coyote & everything else with feather & fur" invasion well.

The difference I think with these coyotes is that they are adapted & much healthier than the "refugees" were. Probably bigger too. But definitly coyotes.

I was just reading about a Wolf reintroduction that took place in Idaho in the 1990's. Apparently there was a documented case of a wolf killed here in Colorado on I-70 in 2004; thought to have been part of a pack that migrated from Idaho.
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Old 08-29-2017, 03:04 PM
 
Location: Heart of Dixie
12,446 posts, read 11,568,731 times
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We have a pack of coyotes that roams through our neighborhood in the early morning hours. They rid the neighborhood of rabbits and cats. My wife and I went walking yesterday, and a resident asked us to be on the lookout for their siamese cat. That's the fourth or fifth time someone has asked us about a missing cat.

Anyway, one night I was walking alone and some coyotes crossed the road ahead of me. I stomped my foot to get them to run, but one of the coyotes just stopped and turned to look at me until the others had fled. Then it slowly went in the direction of the others. That's one serious alpha.
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