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Old 12-05-2017, 02:34 PM
 
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Live on the outer edges of Las Vegas. Yesterday, I found a stream of dried blood where probably a rabbit, was attacked and quickly taken away. We live with coyotes, there's a golf course here which give them a constant supply of rabbits.

Have dealt with bobcats a few times, Coyotes a lot. Both have ignored me and moved away. Have been as close to a coyote outside probably by 10 ft.

My HOA has coyote warnings sent out so people watch their pets. We have had many pets 'taken' from yards over the years. It is shocking. The HOA guards find collars and nothing else.

Also pets have been taken while on leashes and people walking them. Common knowledge if one picks up the pet, the coyote will move on. So people have not been attacked in the decade I've lived here.
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Old 12-06-2017, 10:15 AM
 
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Originally Posted by foundapeanut View Post
Live on the outer edges of Las Vegas. Yesterday, I found a stream of dried blood where probably a rabbit, was attacked and quickly taken away. We live with coyotes, there's a golf course here which give them a constant supply of rabbits.

Have dealt with bobcats a few times, Coyotes a lot. Both have ignored me and moved away. Have been as close to a coyote outside probably by 10 ft.

My HOA has coyote warnings sent out so people watch their pets. We have had many pets 'taken' from yards over the years. It is shocking. The HOA guards find collars and nothing else.

Also pets have been taken while on leashes and people walking them. Common knowledge if one picks up the pet, the coyote will move on. So people have not been attacked in the decade I've lived here.
thanks for that....

I heard someone near me was walking his dog, and the coyote, moved in on them, and attacked...he picked up his dog and moved on like you say, but it must have been a seriously frightening moment.

I would suggest to anyone you know who have small dogs to be very careful.
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Old 12-06-2017, 10:43 AM
 
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OH I can't even imagine the feeling one would have watching this happen to the poor pet. Coyotes are fast, if you don't pick your pet up before they get near it, its gone.

A few years ago I was out in our back yard, we had about an acre of land on a golf course. I was with the handyman telling him what I needed done. There were some rabbits in the yard playing. He said to me turn around. 3 coyotes were watching us through the fence, probably hoping we'd leave. We had a stare down with them and they eventually left. But as they were leaving they kept turning around to see where we were. We watched them go up the golf course a couple holes. I know if we moved out of the back yard they were going to jump the fence. It was Feb so they were gorgeous with their winter coats and didn't look like they were starving.

The rabbits knew they were safe as long as we were there. They just kept playing the dodge the enemy games.
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Old 12-06-2017, 11:24 AM
 
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Originally Posted by foundapeanut View Post
OH I can't even imagine the feeling one would have watching this happen to the poor pet. Coyotes are fast, if you don't pick your pet up before they get near it, its gone.

A few years ago I was out in our back yard, we had about an acre of land on a golf course. I was with the handyman telling him what I needed done. There were some rabbits in the yard playing. He said to me turn around. 3 coyotes were watching us through the fence, probably hoping we'd leave. We had a stare down with them and they eventually left. But as they were leaving they kept turning around to see where we were. We watched them go up the golf course a couple holes. I know if we moved out of the back yard they were going to jump the fence. It was Feb so they were gorgeous with their winter coats and didn't look like they were starving.

The rabbits knew they were safe as long as we were there. They just kept playing the dodge the enemy games.
They're really really smart.....
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Old 12-07-2017, 07:30 AM
 
Location: NW Nevada
15,154 posts, read 12,279,825 times
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Originally Posted by fisheye View Post
I don't know either. Our eastern coyotes are larger and are a mixed breed. I would presume that most people are right about harmless. But there is no way to tell if the individual coyote or pack is hungry, fells challenged or threatened, or is sick from rabies or other diseases. A small child running could trigger their hunting instincts; it would be hard to say?

My feeling is to always treat them as a potential threat. I don't think that we should ever totally accept them or protect them so that they would lose the fear of humans.

Coyotes don't require a moving target to trigger on. Standing still is all the better to them. They are quite...pragmatic. I've heard tell that wolves trigger on flight and it makes sense. But I have no firsthand knowledge of wolves.


You mentioned the hybrid line, and I've read a bit on that. I couldn't believe it at first but there it is. Coywolves. Wow. We have been having hybrid issues with feral dogs which is quite a nasty mix. A whole new breed of predator. Bigger, stronger, less fear of people and more inclined to thrill kill given a chance.


I had a coydog when I was younger. There's a pic of him on my profile. He was a very serious animal and a real handful to train. Security was his job and he was very good at it. He would not respond to commands from anyone but me and we were a tight pair for the whole eight years I had him. Ironically he was killed by coyotes. The pic of him I put up shows his attributes well and highlights the coyote in him.


Coyotes are in reality THE top predator around here. I rank them even over mountain lions in both formidability and shear smarts. I believe we will see an even bigger issue with ol' Wiley as the hybriding spreads. Eventually we will see an entirely new species supplant the old of both wolf and yote.


I've seen some very nasty dog hybrids here that I have trouble even describing accurately. Like something out of some futruristic post apocalypse scifi movie. The coyote has more of a future than humans do I believe in terms of being around long term. Who knows, they may become the dominant animal on the planet in time. They have a knack for survival I have not seen in most other predators and with interbreeding they become even more formidable. The latter is an issue to be taken plumb serious and I shudder to think what the final result of this will look like.


A mix of wolf, coyote and feral dogs added in could be quite the nasty customer.
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Old 12-07-2017, 08:52 AM
 
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Originally Posted by NVplumber View Post
Coyotes don't require a moving target to trigger on. Standing still is all the better to them. They are quite...pragmatic. I've heard tell that wolves trigger on flight and it makes sense. But I have no firsthand knowledge of wolves.


You mentioned the hybrid line, and I've read a bit on that. I couldn't believe it at first but there it is. Coywolves. Wow. We have been having hybrid issues with feral dogs which is quite a nasty mix. A whole new breed of predator. Bigger, stronger, less fear of people and more inclined to thrill kill given a chance.


I had a coydog when I was younger. There's a pic of him on my profile. He was a very serious animal and a real handful to train. Security was his job and he was very good at it. He would not respond to commands from anyone but me and we were a tight pair for the whole eight years I had him. Ironically he was killed by coyotes. The pic of him I put up shows his attributes well and highlights the coyote in him.


Coyotes are in reality THE top predator around here. I rank them even over mountain lions in both formidability and shear smarts. I believe we will see an even bigger issue with ol' Wiley as the hybriding spreads. Eventually we will see an entirely new species supplant the old of both wolf and yote.


I've seen some very nasty dog hybrids here that I have trouble even describing accurately. Like something out of some futruristic post apocalypse scifi movie. The coyote has more of a future than humans do I believe in terms of being around long term. Who knows, they may become the dominant animal on the planet in time. They have a knack for survival I have not seen in most other predators and with interbreeding they become even more formidable. The latter is an issue to be taken plumb serious and I shudder to think what the final result of this will look like.


A mix of wolf, coyote and feral dogs added in could be quite the nasty customer.

I can remember as a kid, adults talking about taking their dogs up to the poconos, b/c they didn't want them any longer, and left them loose. Those were the days when people kept their hunting dogs and such outside year round.

It used to anger me like nothing else....I felt bad for the dogs....and heard later they were breeding with our NE Coyotes, hence, coydogs.
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Old 12-07-2017, 10:01 AM
 
Location: NW Nevada
15,154 posts, read 12,279,825 times
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Originally Posted by cremebrulee View Post
I can remember as a kid, adults talking about taking their dogs up to the poconos, b/c they didn't want them any longer, and left them loose. Those were the days when people kept their hunting dogs and such outside year round.

It used to anger me like nothing else....I felt bad for the dogs....and heard later they were breeding with our NE Coyotes, hence, coydogs.

About 8 years ago my son and I were riding way out in the no mans lad scrub bordering between our place and the reservation. The rez is an endless source of canine breeding stock. the nearest anything was a good 20 miles in any direction from where we were and we noticed a pair of animals shadowing us.


Through the binos what we saw had us looking at each other with that WTF look. They were large and canine. High and heavy in the front and low and slimmer in the hindquarters almost like a hyena. They were black or very dark brown, had tall , pronounced eats and a very odd muzzle shape. They ket closing in a zig zag pattern when we stopped and dismounted and we could make out their features fairly well with our good field glass. My Dads old Navy issue bridge watch binos.


They moved with a speed and grace that rather belied their ungainly looking build and taking the tendency of the desert shimmer to exaggerate size we still figured them to be in the 80+ pound range. A pair of identical animals. Their tails were rather short but coyote style bushy and their heads and necks were proportionate to their heavy shoulders. The odd muzzles were longish but squared more at the front.


They closed to around 200 yards before they stopped and we got a good look. I was only carrying a 45 Colt revolver and my son had a short barreled shotgun so we weren't gunned to even try taking a shot at them. Though had I a good rifle I would have gave taking them both out a serious try. They were really spooky looking and we both figured them as hybrids. With what sort of dog I can't say but large and strong was a certainty.


They didn't seem at all concerned of us posing much danger and they stayed with us for a couple more miles after we mounted back up. I threw a couple rounds at them finally to discourage any further interest in us but I didn't have serious intent to try and actually hit them. I did come close enough to send them heading away and they were remarkably fast.


I've seen lots of hybrids but nothing that looked like these did. But the rez is a breeding ground for some very odd dog mixes and further adding coyote DNA nothing surprises me that much. What things will eventually start looking like does make the hair on my neck stand up. Wild dogs run in packs of their own out on the rez and it's a huge area.


The river runs right through it so both food and water are plentiful. Predator paradise. I wish I had been able to drop one of these animals and gotten a really close look. I would have liked to have turned the body in to the local Fish and Wildlife field office for their edification. I'm thinking their biologist who is a hunting buddy would have been quite interested. We came up with all sorts of possible mixes that could have produced more than one animal like these but without actual DNA it's just spitballing.


We never saw them again and have been back out there a lot hoping to. You never see such things when you're ready. Mores the pity. The thought of them continuing such a bloodline spooks me no end.
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Old 12-07-2017, 11:20 AM
 
26,455 posts, read 25,402,152 times
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Originally Posted by NVplumber View Post
About 8 years ago my son and I were riding way out in the no mans lad scrub bordering between our place and the reservation. The rez is an endless source of canine breeding stock. the nearest anything was a good 20 miles in any direction from where we were and we noticed a pair of animals shadowing us.


Through the binos what we saw had us looking at each other with that WTF look. They were large and canine. High and heavy in the front and low and slimmer in the hindquarters almost like a hyena. They were black or very dark brown, had tall , pronounced eats and a very odd muzzle shape. They ket closing in a zig zag pattern when we stopped and dismounted and we could make out their features fairly well with our good field glass. My Dads old Navy issue bridge watch binos.


They moved with a speed and grace that rather belied their ungainly looking build and taking the tendency of the desert shimmer to exaggerate size we still figured them to be in the 80+ pound range. A pair of identical animals. Their tails were rather short but coyote style bushy and their heads and necks were proportionate to their heavy shoulders. The odd muzzles were longish but squared more at the front.


They closed to around 200 yards before they stopped and we got a good look. I was only carrying a 45 Colt revolver and my son had a short barreled shotgun so we weren't gunned to even try taking a shot at them. Though had I a good rifle I would have gave taking them both out a serious try. They were really spooky looking and we both figured them as hybrids. With what sort of dog I can't say but large and strong was a certainty.


They didn't seem at all concerned of us posing much danger and they stayed with us for a couple more miles after we mounted back up. I threw a couple rounds at them finally to discourage any further interest in us but I didn't have serious intent to try and actually hit them. I did come close enough to send them heading away and they were remarkably fast.


I've seen lots of hybrids but nothing that looked like these did. But the rez is a breeding ground for some very odd dog mixes and further adding coyote DNA nothing surprises me that much. What things will eventually start looking like does make the hair on my neck stand up. Wild dogs run in packs of their own out on the rez and it's a huge area.


The river runs right through it so both food and water are plentiful. Predator paradise. I wish I had been able to drop one of these animals and gotten a really close look. I would have liked to have turned the body in to the local Fish and Wildlife field office for their edification. I'm thinking their biologist who is a hunting buddy would have been quite interested. We came up with all sorts of possible mixes that could have produced more than one animal like these but without actual DNA it's just spitballing.


We never saw them again and have been back out there a lot hoping to. You never see such things when you're ready. Mores the pity. The thought of them continuing such a bloodline spooks me no end.
I know your right, don't you wish you would have had a camera.....? Thank you for the perfect description....wow, yes, one never knows what lerks in ares of the U.S. that are uninhabited.

I have seen some strange things in my day....one just two years ago....I was on my way traveling North in West Virginia....believe it was I-77? On the south side of the road, I looked over and there were two dogs playing....bout the size of greyhounds....not nearly as thin, built well, but all grey and spotted. Never ever saw something like that before. Those forests are so huge, one never knows what is in them....and also, in Daniel Boone National Forest. Huge.

so, yes, it is scary sometimes, to see these animals evolving, inter-breeding with each other.

I googled the dogs I saw, but there was nothing colored like them except hyenas...but shaped more like big dogs.

tell you the truth, I believe man has bought this on himself and will suffer for it. Way too many people have purchased wild animals and they've either gotten loose or were left go on purpose....and this is what happens.

I saw, with my own eyes, while walking my dobies in the woods, a wild black and I mean shiny black panther....it's coat was ink black that it shone blue in the sun....beautiful animal....long tail that curled up when near the ground.

If you google black panther sightings in Pennsylvania, you will see a whole lot of witnesses have seen them and some pictures have been captured.

again, exotic pets that got lose, or were left go? Who knows, but they must have been breeding, b/c others are spotting them in our forests.

Perfect example is the problem they are having with the snakes down in the glades, they are breeding and traveling north now. And inter-breeding with each other.

Man is so stupid!! they will do anything for a buck!!! So they will suffer the consequences, you don't mess with nature or karma.

BTW, I traveled in Missouri, Ok and Texas way way back, and loved it there, the Res people were outstanding and nice. We had fun, knowing them. We went to a pow wow...way up in the mountains, the women were making fried bread, yummy. Anyway, I don't know what we were drinking but when I woke up, my jean bottoms were a tad burndt, so I wondered if I made a fool of myself, dancing around the large fire? I don't remember a thing?????

LOL

Last edited by cremebrulee; 12-07-2017 at 11:30 AM..
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Old 12-07-2017, 11:27 AM
 
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Originally Posted by Forever Blue View Post
OP back.

I still haven't returned to the spot where I saw the coyote. I'm sure I'll be back again one day.
maybe, maybe not? hard to say....coyotes and wolves will clean out an area of food, rabbits, birds, cats, chickens, moose, deer, house dogs, etc....and then move on....so, it depends on the available food present in your area.

Man re-introduced wolves back in the west, and for a while they were good for the ecology there, but now, they are killing farmers stock, and becoming a huge problem, b/c they are over breeding. Remember they have puppies just like dogs, and those babies need to be fed, so they will kill anything to feed them.
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Old 12-07-2017, 11:49 AM
 
Location: NW Nevada
15,154 posts, read 12,279,825 times
Reputation: 13996
Quote:
Originally Posted by cremebrulee View Post
I know your right, don't you wish you would have had a camera.....? Thank you for the perfect description....wow, yes, one never knows what lerks in ares of the U.S. that are uninhabited.

I have seen some strange things in my day....one just two years ago....I was on my way traveling North in West Virginia....believe it was I-77? On the south side of the road, I looked over and there were two dogs playing....bout the size of greyhounds....not nearly as thin, built well, but all grey and spotted. Never ever saw something like that before. Those forests are so huge, one never knows what is in them....and also, in Daniel Boone National Forest. Huge.

so, yes, it is scary sometimes, to see these animals evolving, inter-breeding with each other.

I googled the dogs I saw, but there was nothing colored like them except hyenas...but shaped more like big dogs.

tell you the truth, I believe man has bought this on himself and will suffer for it. Way too many people have purchased wild animals and they've either gotten loose or were left go on purpose....and this is what happens.

I saw, with my own eyes, while walking my dobies in the woods, a wild black and I mean shiny black panther....it's coat was ink black that it shone blue in the sun....beautiful animal....long tail that curled up when near the ground.

If you google black panther sightings in Pennsylvania, you will see a whole lot of witnesses have seen them and some pictures have been captured.

again, exotic pets that got lose, or were left go? Who knows, but they must have been breeding, b/c others are spotting them in our forests.

Perfect example is the problem they are having with the snakes down in the glades, they are breeding and traveling north now. And inter-breeding with each other.

Man is so stupid!! they will do anything for a buck!!! So they will suffer the consequences, you don't mess with nature or karma.

BTW, I traveled in Missouri, Ok and Texas way way back, and loved it there, the Res people were outstanding and nice. We had fun, knowing them. We went to a pow wow...way up in the mountains, the women were making fried bread, yummy. Anyway, I don't know what we were drinking but when I woke up, my jean bottoms were a tad burndt, so I wondered if I made a fool of myself, dancing around the large fire? I don't remember a thing?????

LOL

Truly, people are about the most stupid critter on the planet when it comes to playing with "breeding". Take these dog fighting creeps for instance. Crossing all manner of the biggest, strongest and most aggressive animals there is and often, as you say, having them end up running wild.


Man is regularly bringing all manner of hurt down when it comes to crossing breeds of dogs and now we have domestic/wild hybrids developing breeding populations. We never learn. Killer bees, pythons in the Everglades. Invasive species are a serious problem. One has to wonder what sort of mischief the government is into with weaponizing animals and what may have gotten loose.
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