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Old 12-07-2017, 12:12 PM
 
26,446 posts, read 25,377,073 times
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Quote:
NVplumber;One has to wonder what sort of mischief the government is into with weaponizing animals and what may have gotten loose.
yupper, don't ever try and tell me they're not. Some of the experiments the Russians did way back during the 2nd world war were inhuman, no play meant on words, if you know what I mean.
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Old 12-08-2017, 01:27 PM
 
Location: NW Nevada
15,128 posts, read 12,264,209 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by cremebrulee View Post
yupper, don't ever try and tell me they're not. Some of the experiments the Russians did way back during the 2nd world war were inhuman, no play meant on words, if you know what I mean.

The military has experimented with lots of weaponized animal concepts. Bats, pigeons, dolphins, sharks, dogs, apes, and these are just the ones we know about. What they may have tried by fiddling with DNA and genetics is a scary thought.


Trying to splice something like a hyena with a big cat or maybe apes and predator felines spliced together. Hybriding animals with totally incompatable DNA. I don't sell the military short on anything. Who knows what stuff they got from the Nazis that they continued experiments with.
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Old 12-09-2017, 05:55 AM
 
Location: New York Area
18,430 posts, read 7,282,817 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by NVplumber View Post
The military has experimented with lots of weaponized animal concepts. Bats, pigeons, dolphins, sharks, dogs, apes, and these are just the ones we know about. What they may have tried by fiddling with DNA and genetics is a scary thought.

Trying to splice something like a hyena with a big cat or maybe apes and predator felines spliced together. Hybriding animals with totally incompatable DNA. I don't sell the military short on anything. Who knows what stuff they got from the Nazis that they continued experiments with.
I know people that have weaponized their Golden Retrievers. In addition to having an ability to bit, their tails are used as attack weapons as well.
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Old 12-09-2017, 09:08 AM
 
Location: NW Nevada
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Originally Posted by jbgusa View Post
I know people that have weaponized their Golden Retrievers. In addition to having an ability to bit, their tails are used as attack weapons as well.

Lol, well, Labs, Chesapeakes, Perinease etc all have naturally weaponized tails. They can beat you to death lickety split. My Husky Perinease mix could clean every piece of furniture in the house with her tail. Since she wouldn't bite if her life depended on it she had to have some means of defense.


I had a Lab/Chesapeake mix once who when just a puppy could deploy his tail like a Stegasaurus. The military uses this ability. The animals are trained to enter the enemies CP and sweep all important strategic documents off the tables so that no plans can be made.
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Old 12-09-2017, 09:20 AM
 
Location: Cody, WY
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Coyotes eat primarily mice; an adult can eat up to fifty per day. They are opportunistic as are all wild animals, but that doesn't mean that they randomly attack anything that moves.
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Old 12-09-2017, 10:02 AM
 
Location: NW Nevada
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Originally Posted by Happy in Wyoming View Post
Coyotes eat primarily mice; an adult can eat up to fifty per day. They are opportunistic as are all wild animals, but that doesn't mean that they randomly attack anything that moves.

Mice, gophers, moles, and rabbits. I see singles working the fields all the time picking off gophers, which we consider a public service and more power to them. Citified yotes are a different matter entirely. Their primary food sources revolve around people, which leads to issues.


Coyotes hanging around urban neighborhoods need to be encouraged to seek life elsewhere. Anything within their weight class is fair game. Cats and small dogs are favored groceries. They will also leave trails of destruction with garbage cans. City yotes are a different breed than rural yotes. Totally.
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Old 12-09-2017, 11:09 AM
 
Location: Cody, WY
9,914 posts, read 11,589,303 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by NVplumber View Post
Mice, gophers, moles, and rabbits. I see singles working the fields all the time picking off gophers, which we consider a public service and more power to them. Citified yotes are a different matter entirely. Their primary food sources revolve around people, which leads to issues.


Coyotes hanging around urban neighborhoods need to be encouraged to seek life elsewhere. Anything within their weight class is fair game. Cats and small dogs are favored groceries. They will also leave trails of destruction with garbage cans. City yotes are a different breed than rural yotes. Totally.
A biologist in Illinois was able to observe a coyote who actually lived in the Chicago Loop. The coyote did eat food that humans had left around the area. However, virtually no one knew of the coyote's existence because he was very discreet and always avoided human contact. This makes sense.
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Old 12-09-2017, 02:18 PM
 
Location: NW Nevada
15,128 posts, read 12,264,209 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Happy in Wyoming View Post
A biologist in Illinois was able to observe a coyote who actually lived in the Chicago Loop. The coyote did eat food that humans had left around the area. However, virtually no one knew of the coyote's existence because he was very discreet and always avoided human contact. This makes sense.

The biggest issues evolve when well intentioned but not so in the know folks put food out for coyotes. I knew a guy once who didn't own a dog but still went through 50 pounds a month putting it out for yotes, and by default other critters like raccoons, skunks and such. He lived in a burb outside of Reno.


By doing this wild animals lose their fear of people and will actively seek out contact. It's a bad idea.
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Old 12-09-2017, 04:17 PM
 
Location: WMHT
3,465 posts, read 3,447,668 times
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Thumbs down I'd rather have a bobcat than coyotes

Here in New Hampshire, coyote is treated as an invasive species, with open season year round.
Quote:
Originally Posted by Happy in Wyoming View Post
Coyotes eat primarily mice; an adult can eat up to fifty per day. They are opportunistic as are all wild animals, but that doesn't mean that they randomly attack anything that moves.
Our eastern coyotes in N.NE are bigger than out west, and are not particularly effective mousers. Genetic testing has shown no recent dog hybridization, but recent interbreeding with Eastern Canadian wolves, producing the eastern coyote's larger size and unique behavioral characteristics.

Other species like fox and bobcat are much more effective at catching mice and voles, and unfortunately are often out-competed by (if not outright eaten by) coyotes)
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Old 12-09-2017, 07:09 PM
 
Location: New York Area
18,430 posts, read 7,282,817 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Nonesuch View Post
Here in New Hampshire, coyote is treated as an invasive species, with open season year round.

Our eastern coyotes in N.NE are bigger than out west, and are not particularly effective mousers. Genetic testing has shown no recent dog hybridization, but recent interbreeding with Eastern Canadian wolves, producing the eastern coyote's larger size and unique behavioral characteristics.

Other species like fox and bobcat are much more effective at catching mice and voles, and unfortunately are often out-competed by (if not outright eaten by) coyotes)
Even wolves kill mice where necessary. And eastern coyotes are filling the wolves' ecological niche. With such an abundance of deer of course they'll form packs and genetically grow larger.
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