U.S. CitiesCity-Data Forum Index
Covid-19 Information Page
Go Back   City-Data Forum > General Forums > Nature
 [Register]
Please register to participate in our discussions with 2 million other members - it's free and quick! Some forums can only be seen by registered members. After you create your account, you'll be able to customize options and access all our 15,000 new posts/day with fewer ads.
View detailed profile (Advanced) or search
site with Google Custom Search

Search Forums  (Advanced)
 
 
Old 05-01-2019, 08:06 PM
 
Location: NW Nevada
15,179 posts, read 12,311,427 times
Reputation: 14008

Advertisements

Quote:
Originally Posted by jbgusa View Post
But they make up in ferocity what they lack in intellect.

I had a big male Norwiegian Elkhound once. He was a customer in physique. A better family dog I couldn't have asked for. The yotes came in one night and jumped him in the yard. I heard this horrible battle going on and yelled for my son to fetch my shotgun and I joined the battle. Killed one yote and sent the others scampering.


Had to call the local vet who was a friend of mine to come to his clinic in town to save my Elkhound. He was some chewed up but he was giving as good as he was getting. But if I hadn't joined the fight he would have lost.


I declared war after that and started actively hunting Wile E. Me, my AR 15, my son and his Rem VTR and some badazz varmint loads. We hung carcasses on the fencelines. We were taking scalps. That Elkhound was family and we made Wile E pay for being that brazen and stupid.
Quick reply to this message

 
Old 05-01-2019, 08:51 PM
 
Location: Wyoming
9,710 posts, read 18,110,725 times
Reputation: 14604
Quote:
Originally Posted by WyoNewk View Post
... If this wasn't a thread about TOWN meetings I'd tell my story about meeting a grizzly on a narrow trail.
Quote:
Originally Posted by cremebrulee View Post
oh please share?
Quote:
Originally Posted by Forever Blue View Post
Please share anyway!
It wasn't really anything too special, except it probably elevated my blood pressure up there. A couple friends and I took a fishing trip to Alaska several years ago. (It was a return trip for me, since I'd lived there in the late 60s/1970.) We met an old friend of mine and fished the Kenai River for a few days, then met up with some other friends at Valdez and went out on the Gulf for some ocean fishing. Both were fun, if not too rewarding, but our final fishing destination was the highlight, Katmai National Park.

Katmai is probably most notable for its large population of brown (grizzly) bear and Brooks Falls, where they like to fish for sockeye climbing the falls.

Katmai, at least at that time (early 80s), was the only place left in the world where no effort was made to keep people away from brown bear/keep bear away from people. We'd rented a small cabin, and the bears frequently made it to our porch. The rangers instructed us that if a bear came our way when we had a fish on the line, we were to immediately cut the line. They didn't want bears associating humans with fish. We lost a lot of fish that way, but we didn't get eaten, so all was great.

So one of the mornings one of my friends and I decided to walk up to the falls, maybe a mile from the cabins. As luck would have it, we met a big one coming our way on the trail. We'd been instructed how to deal with it and followed the instructions to a T. "Hi bear, hi bear, hi bear" so he'd know we were on the trail and wasn't suddenly startled when he saw us. And we stepped off the trail. Timber was thick there, so we couldn't get off the trail more than a foot or so. That's UP CLOSE to a huge brown bear!

That same morning a National Geographic photographer had been run over by a bear on his way to the falls. Photographer was facing the falls, camera and a big lens on his tripod pointed at the falls, and the bear came from behind him headed for the falls. Bear wasn't out to do the guy any harm, he was just in a hurry to get some dinner. Guy had a few scrapes and bruises, bear didn't slow down.

They've since built an area for photographers to set up -- bear-proofed it to a point.

But it was a wonderful experience, and I'd recommend it to anyone.
Quick reply to this message
 
Old 05-02-2019, 04:50 AM
 
Location: New York Area
18,534 posts, read 7,344,185 times
Reputation: 14223
Quote:
Originally Posted by WyoNewk View Post
It wasn't really anything too special, except it probably elevated my blood pressure up there. A couple friends and I took a fishing trip to Alaska several years ago. (It was a return trip for me, since I'd lived there in the late 60s/1970.) We met an old friend of mine and fished the Kenai River for a few days, then met up with some other friends at Valdez and went out on the Gulf for some ocean fishing. Both were fun, if not too rewarding, but our final fishing destination was the highlight, Katmai National Park.

Katmai is probably most notable for its large population of brown (grizzly) bear and Brooks Falls, where they like to fish for sockeye climbing the falls.

Katmai, at least at that time (early 80s), was the only place left in the world where no effort was made to keep people away from brown bear/keep bear away from people. We'd rented a small cabin, and the bears frequently made it to our porch. The rangers instructed us that if a bear came our way when we had a fish on the line, we were to immediately cut the line. They didn't want bears associating humans with fish. We lost a lot of fish that way, but we didn't get eaten, so all was great.

So one of the mornings one of my friends and I decided to walk up to the falls, maybe a mile from the cabins. As luck would have it, we met a big one coming our way on the trail. We'd been instructed how to deal with it and followed the instructions to a T. "Hi bear, hi bear, hi bear" so he'd know we were on the trail and wasn't suddenly startled when he saw us. And we stepped off the trail. Timber was thick there, so we couldn't get off the trail more than a foot or so. That's UP CLOSE to a huge brown bear!

That same morning a National Geographic photographer had been run over by a bear on his way to the falls. Photographer was facing the falls, camera and a big lens on his tripod pointed at the falls, and the bear came from behind him headed for the falls. Bear wasn't out to do the guy any harm, he was just in a hurry to get some dinner. Guy had a few scrapes and bruises, bear didn't slow down.

They've since built an area for photographers to set up -- bear-proofed it to a point.

But it was a wonderful experience, and I'd recommend it to anyone.
Beautiful, well-written post.
Quick reply to this message
 
Old 05-02-2019, 05:12 AM
 
Location: Coastal Georgia
39,194 posts, read 48,168,922 times
Reputation: 66727
A relative lives on Governor Reynolds mountain in Asheville, NC. While driving through their neighborhood, I was thrilled to see a bear crossing the road. Folks there see many bears around their homes.
Quick reply to this message
 
Old 05-02-2019, 08:55 PM
 
Location: Denver, CO
23,834 posts, read 10,890,626 times
Reputation: 17849
Quote:
Originally Posted by jbgusa View Post
This must be in the Northeast, where coyotes are forming packs. Normally they are solitary hunters. The scuttle-but is that they have cross-bred with wolves on their decades-long journey east, by way of a northern route through Canada, to fill the ecological niche left behind by the wolf's extirpation from the East.
I have heard that as well. Eastern/Northeaster coyotes are larger because of the cross breeding.
Quick reply to this message
 
Old 05-03-2019, 06:03 AM
 
Location: NW Nevada
15,179 posts, read 12,311,427 times
Reputation: 14008
Quote:
Originally Posted by Pilot1 View Post
I have heard that as well. Eastern/Northeaster coyotes are larger because of the cross breeding.

We don't have wolves here but our yotes have been crossing with feral dogs for a long time now. I've seen some big pure coyote looking critters (60+ pounds) and I had a coydog for a long time, There's a pic on my profile. He was a serious badazz.


I've seen some strange looking critters out in the scrub. We bordered right on the Rez and feral dogs were numerous. A lot of them just got ate but crossbreeding happens too. It's been an issue for a while now. That's bad enough. We don't need crossing with wolves.
Quick reply to this message
 
Old 05-03-2019, 07:03 AM
 
Location: New York Area
18,534 posts, read 7,344,185 times
Reputation: 14223
Quote:
Originally Posted by NVplumber View Post
We don't have wolves here but our yotes have been crossing with feral dogs for a long time now. I've seen some big pure coyote looking critters (60+ pounds) and I had a coydog for a long time, There's a pic on my profile. He was a serious badazz.

I've seen some strange looking critters out in the scrub. We bordered right on the Rez and feral dogs were numerous. A lot of them just got ate but crossbreeding happens too. It's been an issue for a while now. That's bad enough. We don't need crossing with wolves.
In our area, when coyote meets dog, it's love at first sight, but for the flesh, not the sex. So it's wolf in the mix.
Quick reply to this message
 
Old 05-03-2019, 08:53 AM
 
26,507 posts, read 25,454,148 times
Reputation: 16309
Quote:
Originally Posted by jbgusa View Post
In our area, when coyote meets dog, it's love at first sight, but for the flesh, not the sex. So it's wolf in the mix.
here is PA, years ago, I remember when I was a kid, people used to talk about taking their dogs for a ride up in the Poconos (they were old timer farm people and that's what they did) and just dumped them off, (it used to make me so freakin angry) anyway, story goes, they bred with coyotes, and we now have a mixed breed we call cy-dogs? or coy-dogs....?

I saw one, when I was working up there..
Quick reply to this message
 
Old 05-03-2019, 09:22 AM
 
Location: New York Area
18,534 posts, read 7,344,185 times
Reputation: 14223
Quote:
Originally Posted by cremebrulee View Post
here is PA, years ago, I remember when I was a kid, people used to talk about taking their dogs for a ride up in the Poconos (they were old timer farm people and that's what they did) and just dumped them off, (it used to make me so freakin angry) anyway, story goes, they bred with coyotes, and we now have a mixed breed we call cy-dogs? or coy-dogs....?

I saw one, when I was working up there..
Interesting. How do we know they interbred or didn't just become a meal?
Quick reply to this message
 
Old 05-03-2019, 09:56 AM
 
26,507 posts, read 25,454,148 times
Reputation: 16309
Quote:
Originally Posted by jbgusa View Post
Interesting. How do we know they interbred or didn't just become a meal?
I'm sure some became meals, however, others inter bred....

Here is an interesting article.

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Coydog

I knew a man who owned a wold, a female, and whenever she came in heat, he tried to breed her with his other line of dogs....dobermans....she always killed the male he put in the pen with her? So you never know.

here is another interesting article....
https://www.poconorecord.com/article...tdoors/8010308

when I was little, our adults were mostly farmers, they didn't have much education....but there were not learned as we are about animals and pets....they had hunting dogs, coonhounds, begels, etc. Some people believed that their livestock worked for them, and their lives depended on their livestock...and our winters were tough, lots of snow and extremely cold, more so than today.

People kept their dogs outside, in what they called coops or dog houses. Very few dogs were kept inside....and what people today call designer dogs, we called mutes who were worth nothing, they'd actually give them away if they didn't have the proper blood lines. Then someone decided that these so called mutes were smart dogs and made good pets, so they started interbreeding dogs with papers to these mutes...making designer dogs....

so long story short, I heard stories from many adults back then who would talk about people taking their dogs for a ride, up the the Poconos, and leaving them go. Boy I'd get so mad, but dared not say a word if I didn't want an azz whipping. We were taught to respect adults....back then...well, years later, I heard stories from the local pocono residents, that some of these bigger dogs that were set free, took up with the coyotes, which were now mixed with wolf, hence, they called them coy dogs...?

I guess the deciding factor remained with the female in heat,....and how much or not she wanted to allow a dog to breed with her?

Back then, people didn't fix their dogs...or take them to the vets...a whole different world....some good, some not so good, as in life.
Quick reply to this message
Please register to post and access all features of our very popular forum. It is free and quick. Over $68,000 in prizes has already been given out to active posters on our forum. Additional giveaways are planned.

Detailed information about all U.S. cities, counties, and zip codes on our site: City-data.com.


 
Please update this thread with any new information or opinions. This open thread is still read by thousands of people, so we encourage all additional points of view.

Quick Reply
Message:
Over $104,000 in prizes was already given out to active posters on our forum and additional giveaways are planned!

Go Back   City-Data Forum > General Forums > Nature
Follow City-Data.com founder on our Forum or

All times are GMT -6.

© 2005-2020, Advameg, Inc. · Please obey Forum Rules · Terms of Use and Privacy Policy · Bug Bounty

City-Data.com - Archive 1, 2, 3, 4, 5, 6, 7, 8, 9, 10, 11, 12, 13, 14, 15, 16, 17, 18, 19, 20, 21, 22, 23, 24, 25, 26, 27, 28, 29, 30, 31, 32, 33, 34, 35 - Top