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Old 05-07-2019, 09:04 AM
 
Location: By the sea, by the sea, by the beautiful sea
59,143 posts, read 42,956,503 times
Reputation: 31573

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Quote:
Originally Posted by cremebrulee View Post
I'm certain you get used to seeing them, however, if I lived there, and I never would...and saw one for the first time, I'd probably have a heart attack. I don't like Florida...at all....way too many people....and too many alligators, big snakes, spiders, etc....they say the snakes are getting way out of hand....interbreeding and all....

have you seen any?

I'm on the NC coast. Other than the alligator in the driveway which was apparently out for a stroll, the only other ones I've seen were in a large lake where it seems they leave people alone unless provoked. I've seen a Copperhead here and there, they're fine unless you corner/provoke them, snakes generally don't bother me, they keep the rodent population in check, although I hear non-native species are a bit out of hand in the Everglades. This time of year some of the tourists can be more annoying than the other critters.
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Old 05-07-2019, 09:06 AM
 
Location: By the sea, by the sea, by the beautiful sea
59,143 posts, read 42,956,503 times
Reputation: 31573
Quote:
Originally Posted by NVplumber View Post
I'm way done with jungle/swamp environments and critters too. I like my high desert. Mountain lions are quite enough with the occasional bear. Gators and pythons are to much. Swamps and horses don't mix well either and I like my horses.


I know how a horse reacts to a cat. Can't imagine a huge snake or big gator. OK, we has a rodeo.


I'm fond of the high desert myself, if I could find a place where it was bordered by an ocean I might consider moving.
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Old 05-07-2019, 12:36 PM
Status: "County of Surreal" (set 5 days ago)
 
9,566 posts, read 11,501,267 times
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In Arizona I did when I was walking in the early morning. I had a coyote across the street not far from me. I was a bit worried. I just walked w/ attitude. I hadn't heard of them attacking anyone, but you never know. I probably could have fought him off though. A lady was walking her little dog after me and I told her to be careful. He could run and swoop up the little thing. She didn't look too worried though. Tough older lady.
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Old 05-07-2019, 04:45 PM
 
Location: ☀️ SWFL ⛱ 🌴
2,866 posts, read 1,954,348 times
Reputation: 10610
Florida here! No alligators in my immediate neighborhood, but I stay aware of my surroundings at all times. We cleared a 1/4 acre of Brazilian pepper and I planted natives like wax myrtle, red cedar, Jamaican Capers, Simpson Stoppers, pitch apple, cocoplum and green button wood. I’m watering 15 saplings everyday for three weeks, every other for the next three and every third for the last three that will get me to reliable rain.

So I’m out with the muscadine grape vines, invasive air potato vines I’m digging up, along with a few oaks, slash pines and saw palmetto. I’ve already met a black racer that likes to sun by the saw palmetto. I make a lot of noise when I out there, I don’t like to surprise anything.

Before we had it cleared, I never set foot in there. It was so dense with the Brazilian pepper it was impossible to walk through there. I learned early never to never put a hand or foot anywhere you can’t see in FL. Which works for other areas too.

There are stray cats in the neighborhood. A few years ago a new one was in our yard and I let my grandkids look at it while I stayed with the dog. They came running back to tell me it was a large cat with tufts on its ears and face. I didn’t realize bobcats were here with coyote too. Duh!

I saw a picture on FB today of a black bear in the woods at the end of the road where we used to live in NY. I saw one in our neighborhood there a few years ago. Somehow being attached by a bear seems better than an alligator, but if the end result is the same, I guess it isn’t.
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Old 05-16-2019, 01:08 PM
 
Location: Kirkland, WA (Metro Seattle)
4,487 posts, read 3,631,632 times
Reputation: 8410
Quote:
Originally Posted by NVplumber View Post
I wouldn't sweat coyotes if I were you. I've never heard of an attack on an adult human by a yote though rabid attacks have happened very rarely. Very. Rutting bucks are more dangerous. By sheer numbers there are more people seriously hurt by deer every year than every other critter combined. Coyotes in urban areas are actually pretty common. They thrive around people. Some mental midgets actually put out food for them and that is a VERY bad idea. One critter you really don't want hanging around is ol'Wiley. Especially if you have pets. Even large dogs. One on one yotes won't bother large dogs, but they will lure them out and pack them and domestic cat is a delicacy on coyotes menu.
WA State, PacNW region (also extending into Oregon, south) is a haven for coyotes I've noticed. Makes sense, as it's home for lots of game including rats, mice, other pests they regularly devour. Very few neighborhoods in Seattle are truly "urban" since Seattle is pretty much a city dropped into a lush, green, pine forest. Go outside it, you're in the hummocky swamp that is the vast bulk of near-sea level land out here. The Wild. And there you'll find critters, see other replies including one by me earlier. Head to the Cascades foothills, 20 - 40 miles east, you're really in God's country quickly.

Coyotes will absolutely "sweep" through all kinds of neighborhoods and areas that are famous nationally, like Redmond (home of Microsoft) and Bellevue (some of the nation's better primary schools, and fabulous suburban properties). When they take up shop, the cats disappear. I mean ...WHOOSH... and they're swept out. Dinner, no doubt, vivre la nature in action, for better or worse! I'd sooner leave food for a spitting cobra than attract coyotes, they're scavengers and scum-animals themselves in many parts of the country (used to be a bounty on them in Nevada back c. 1990, no idea today). Starlight coyote hunts w/small caliber, long-range rounds (e.g. 22-250) and Gen III night vision are big business in Texas and other states, with bag limits and proper permission of course. They are nocturnal, as are wild hogs, another story altogether (= no limit, "please" eradicate as many as you can!)

Funny coyote story: 1990s, had cause to be in Yosemite National Park for work maybe 10 days over Xmas 1993 I do believe (I was drinking at the time, I recall picking up some Xmas grog at the canteen, but quit permanently not long after in 1994). It was bitter cold in the off-season, but I'm no stranger to that being from Michigan and the company was paying for all my gear, so what did I care? In fact, it was magical in strange ways w/clear and sunny days (and watching Yosemite Falls frozen solid, then the ice break when the sun's been on it awhile, is astounding. Hundred tons of ice free-falling a thousand feet makes a helluva cloud of ice crystals when it hits below!).

I got to know a few rangers, not many people in the lodges then so there's time to talk. Couple days, I watched coyotes rummaging in steel trash cans outside the lodges and other commons. Obviously didn't go near them. Talked to a ranger one AM who was hanging around, and he said:

"Yeah their full winter coats actually look good this time of year, they're eating their natural food and the trash is slim pickings. During high summer, they look scraggly though. They'll eat pizza, tacos, other crap out of the overflowing cans all season long. I'm dead convinced all that is sickening the poor things. God knows what it does to people!

...his matter-of-fact tone was funny. And, he's probably right?
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Old 05-16-2019, 02:18 PM
 
Location: The High Desert
8,168 posts, read 4,471,196 times
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In the high desert I have them in my yard almost every night. They cut through going to an arroyo that is like a wildlife highway. I never had any trouble with them but I don't tempt them either. Pets stay indoors unless I'm outside. The population varies from year to year and some are beautiful animals. They were here first.
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Old 05-16-2019, 02:45 PM
 
Location: NW Nevada
15,179 posts, read 12,313,291 times
Reputation: 14008
Quote:
Originally Posted by Blondebaerde View Post
WA State, PacNW region (also extending into Oregon, south) is a haven for coyotes I've noticed. Makes sense, as it's home for lots of game including rats, mice, other pests they regularly devour. Very few neighborhoods in Seattle are truly "urban" since Seattle is pretty much a city dropped into a lush, green, pine forest. Go outside it, you're in the hummocky swamp that is the vast bulk of near-sea level land out here. The Wild. And there you'll find critters, see other replies including one by me earlier. Head to the Cascades foothills, 20 - 40 miles east, you're really in God's country quickly.

Coyotes will absolutely "sweep" through all kinds of neighborhoods and areas that are famous nationally, like Redmond (home of Microsoft) and Bellevue (some of the nation's better primary schools, and fabulous suburban properties). When they take up shop, the cats disappear. I mean ...WHOOSH... and they're swept out. Dinner, no doubt, vivre la nature in action, for better or worse! I'd sooner leave food for a spitting cobra than attract coyotes, they're scavengers and scum-animals themselves in many parts of the country (used to be a bounty on them in Nevada back c. 1990, no idea today). Starlight coyote hunts w/small caliber, long-range rounds (e.g. 22-250) and Gen III night vision are big business in Texas and other states, with bag limits and proper permission of course. They are nocturnal, as are wild hogs, another story altogether (= no limit, "please" eradicate as many as you can!)

Funny coyote story: 1990s, had cause to be in Yosemite National Park for work maybe 10 days over Xmas 1993 I do believe (I was drinking at the time, I recall picking up some Xmas grog at the canteen, but quit permanently not long after in 1994). It was bitter cold in the off-season, but I'm no stranger to that being from Michigan and the company was paying for all my gear, so what did I care? In fact, it was magical in strange ways w/clear and sunny days (and watching Yosemite Falls frozen solid, then the ice break when the sun's been on it awhile, is astounding. Hundred tons of ice free-falling a thousand feet makes a helluva cloud of ice crystals when it hits below!).

I got to know a few rangers, not many people in the lodges then so there's time to talk. Couple days, I watched coyotes rummaging in steel trash cans outside the lodges and other commons. Obviously didn't go near them. Talked to a ranger one AM who was hanging around, and he said:

"Yeah their full winter coats actually look good this time of year, they're eating their natural food and the trash is slim pickings. During high summer, they look scraggly though. They'll eat pizza, tacos, other crap out of the overflowing cans all season long. I'm dead convinced all that is sickening the poor things. God knows what it does to people!

...his matter-of-fact tone was funny. And, he's probably right?

My buddies and I used to make decent side cash bounty hunting yotes when we were kids. It was a rare occasion we went much of anywhere with out at least our 22s.Thats been history for quite a while now. There was a saying we had.."Eat lamb. 50 million coyotes can't be wrong." Same applied to calves and foals. Yotes are like rats. They thrive around people.


They're not a critter one wants hanging around in any numbers. They aren't picky about what they eat and are opportunistic as hell. They are hard on domestic cats to be sure. Yard range domestic chickens, duck, Guine hens and such didn't last long either. If the yotes didn't pick them off owls picked up the slack.
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Old 05-16-2019, 04:33 PM
 
Location: Southern California
6,261 posts, read 8,729,168 times
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Very interesting & informative comments guys!

I got another coyote alert again since 4/30 not far from where I live.

It said: 2 Coyotes approaching employees at a commercial site.
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Old 05-16-2019, 05:16 PM
 
Location: NW Nevada
15,179 posts, read 12,313,291 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Forever Blue View Post
Very interesting & informative comments guys!

I got another coyote alert again since 4/30 not far from where I live.

It said: 2 Coyotes approaching employees at a commercial site.

If they're actually approaching I would hazard to say employees have been feeding them. Wile E get bold if they've been getting hand outs. They get pretty brazen and are quite...entitlement minded. But some people just don't get it. DON'T feed wild animals. Especially canny and highly intelligent ones like yotes. It's tatamount to giving vicious gang bangers drugs and a welfare check. Then cutting them off. They will turn straight to violent crime.
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Old 05-22-2019, 06:06 AM
 
26,507 posts, read 25,457,406 times
Reputation: 16309
Quote:
Originally Posted by NVplumber View Post
My buddies and I used to make decent side cash bounty hunting yotes when we were kids. It was a rare occasion we went much of anywhere with out at least our 22s.Thats been history for quite a while now. There was a saying we had.."Eat lamb. 50 million coyotes can't be wrong." Same applied to calves and foals. Yotes are like rats. They thrive around people.


They're not a critter one wants hanging around in any numbers. They aren't picky about what they eat and are opportunistic as hell. They are hard on domestic cats to be sure. Yard range domestic chickens, duck, Guine hens and such didn't last long either. If the yotes didn't pick them off owls picked up the slack.
I watched a video of a coyote jumping a pretty high fence and taking a little dog...

another video of "I shouldn't be alive" where a man had to walk to work b/c his car wouldn't start, it was still dark out and a group of coyotes attacked him....apparently they had young pups with them...that they needed to feed. He lived, but they really hurt him.
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