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Old 09-19-2017, 07:00 AM
 
Location: Omaha, Nebraska
8,381 posts, read 4,810,791 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by ackmondual View Post
PAY ATTENTION SO YOU DON'T GET LOST!
A tip to help with this: when you come to a junction in the tail, or pass a significant landmark, stop for a moment and turn around and look back the way you came. Take a good, long look, so you'll recognize that junction/feature when you're hiking back down. The trail looks different going up than it does coming down!
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Old 09-19-2017, 09:09 AM
 
Location: Stuck on the East Coast, hoping to head West
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Also, you need to carefully read the description and elevations. Our nearby hiking trails have descriptions. There's a big difference between a 5 mile easy and a 5 mile difficult. Trust me on that one.

As far as time, that depends on the crowds and the trail. I did one hike where the trail narrowed (and there was a steep drop off) and you just had to wait for people to go single file. That added a lot of extra time to my hike.

Definitely pay attention to the trail. I've been on some with missing signs and that was interesting. I've also been on trails with unexpected flooding.

I always talk to the local park rangers and ask about conditions, missing signage, degree of difficulty, and if there's anything else I should know. If there's no ranger, I always greet and ask fellow hikers.
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Old 09-19-2017, 11:07 AM
 
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I find myself somewhat of an expert here as I recently stayed at the lodge at the base of Mt Jo. Although I chose a flatter hike I was told about Mt Jo. The trail is very rocky so ankle support would be good. A hiking stick would be very helpful. Find a stick from the local woods if you don't wand to spring for an aluminum stick. If you are doing a loop, take the shorter trail up and the longer trail down. You can get in shape by climbing stairs.

Folks, this trail is less than 2 miles. So while it would be good to break the boots in a bit, they don't have to be well worn.

I assume you aren't going alone. But if you are staying at the lodge it would be a good idea to tell someone to expect you back. One nice thing about the Adirondacks is the trailheads have sign in sheets where you can post your destination and when you plan to return.

A lot of your preparation will depend on the weather and how much the trail is traveled. A space blanket and poncho, of course. A large garbage sack can be stuffed with leaves for bedding if you can't move. Lightweight synthetic underwear/shirt and jacket. In the winter I carry a lightweight fleece sleep sack that I bought for cheap at dick's sporting store. My pack has a lightweight whistle. A flashlight is good.

When I hike alone, the most important thing is to tell someone you are gone. I text a photo of my vehicle with license plate and a general idea of where I expect to hike. They can call the rangers if they don't hear from me by dark thirty but it has never come to that. This is the smokies where I expect to return to phone range. In the Adirondacks, alert someone where you are staying as cell service is very spotty.
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Old 09-19-2017, 11:20 AM
 
16,258 posts, read 8,867,405 times
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If your smartphone has a compass and a GPS mapping application, make sure you know how to use them. Google Maps has an option to save the map to your phone so you have it even if there is no reception.

For a 5 mile walk? Check the weather. Make sure you have adequate clothing for the next 8 hours.

I'm assuming someone who has not hiked trails before is not going to pick a challenging trail. In mild temperatures, shorts, a short sleeve shirt, and running shoes or similar is just fine. I saw people doing the Grand Canyon rim-to-rim hike in flip flops. I hike in hiking shoes, not boots. I own a few pairs of boots but that's for the winter to keep the snow out, not for ankle support.

What to bring kind of depends on where you're going. I always bring water. I always bring one of those little red 100% DEET bottles. That's enough to do 5 miles and up & down a couple thousand feet of vertical.
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Old 09-19-2017, 01:02 PM
bg7
 
7,697 posts, read 8,599,528 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Aredhel View Post
A tip to help with this: when you come to a junction in the tail, or pass a significant landmark, stop for a moment and turn around and look back the way you came. Take a good, long look, so you'll recognize that junction/feature when you're hiking back down. The trail looks different going up than it does coming down!



This is an important tip
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Old 09-19-2017, 03:24 PM
 
14,260 posts, read 14,305,703 times
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water
protein snacks like fruit and nuts
sunscreen
always have one of those silver thin folded up emergency wrap up thingies in your day pack
many thin layers you can take on and off
hat
whistle
bells on a wrist or ankle strap
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Old 09-20-2017, 05:56 PM
 
1,611 posts, read 756,326 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by GeoffD View Post
If your smartphone has a compass and a GPS mapping application, make sure you know how to use them. Google Maps has an option to save the map to your phone so you have it even if there is no reception.

For a 5 mile walk? Check the weather. Make sure you have adequate clothing for the next 8 hours.

I'm assuming someone who has not hiked trails before is not going to pick a challenging trail. In mild temperatures, shorts, a short sleeve shirt, and running shoes or similar is just fine. I saw people doing the Grand Canyon rim-to-rim hike in flip flops. I hike in hiking shoes, not boots. I own a few pairs of boots but that's for the winter to keep the snow out, not for ankle support.

What to bring kind of depends on where you're going. I always bring water. I always bring one of those little red 100% DEET bottles. That's enough to do 5 miles and up & down a couple thousand feet of vertical.
When I was a kid roaming through woods I would take a compass with me and mark my starting point with the compass.
And I am sure people still do. I guess you can use a satellite phone, but internet is slow. I am talking about remote folks where there is no cellular connectivity.
I am a regular cyclists, but mostly road. I would do more trails if I could get to them easily. Anyway.....
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Old 09-23-2017, 03:18 PM
 
Location: Near Falls Lake
3,105 posts, read 2,095,910 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Aredhel View Post
A tip to help with this: when you come to a junction in the tail, or pass a significant landmark, stop for a moment and turn around and look back the way you came. Take a good, long look, so you'll recognize that junction/feature when you're hiking back down. The trail looks different going up than it does coming down!
That is absolutely true!!!
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Old 09-26-2017, 08:00 AM
 
Location: Watervliet, NY
4,758 posts, read 1,889,704 times
Reputation: 8815
Quote:
Originally Posted by bell235 View Post
Wow im scared now haha. It will be in the adirondack area, specifically mount jo. And a few other even smaller ones. I will say my biggest worry is ticks - dont know if they are in the area but i was not even thinking about getting lost or being stranded. I assume the hikes have signs and whatnot.
BRING MAPS!!!!!!!!!! And stay on MARKED trails. Don't rely on GPS.

Yeah, people don't think about getting lost until it happens. Like those idiot kids who got stranded on Algonquin last winter when a storm blew up.
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Old 09-30-2017, 07:24 AM
 
Location: Squirrel Hill PA
2,084 posts, read 2,010,998 times
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I go for a 2-3 mile hike once a week with a friend and her dog. All I take with me for such a short walk is my phone with me All Trails app loaded and running and my trekking poles.

AllTrails is a free app for your phone that will help you find great trails in your area and usually has information like trail conditions. Descriptions of what you might see along the way, maps and so on. When I get to a trail head ai start up the record feature and the app keeps track of where my car is and where I am in relation to it as I go. It isn't too hard on the battery either.

The Trekking poles really help a lot with stability on rough ground. I jave knee problems and they help me getting up and down steep terrain quite a lot. They take pressure off of the knees and lower back and also help to give your upper body more of a workout. I use the Real Nordic brand of poles.


I don't really find that I need more than that for a 2-3 mile hike. Maybe a bottle of water and a snack.
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