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Old 09-18-2017, 02:20 PM
 
1,494 posts, read 859,277 times
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If this is the wrong place to post this please move it but was unsure where else to put it?

What would you recommend someone bring on a hike (nothing major, under 5 miles, probably 2-3 hour hike) if they were new to hiking? Also, what do you recommend to wear if it were going to be about 65-70 degrees.
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Old 09-18-2017, 03:32 PM
 
Location: Nantahala National Forest, NC
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First...buy hiking boots and break in VERY well prior to using on your hikes. Do not ever wear new boots on a hike

Buy a basic hiking book.
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Old 09-18-2017, 03:39 PM
 
Location: Omaha, Nebraska
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I'd recommend taking along this: https://www.rei.com/learn/expert-adv...ssentials.html.

Remember, it's only a short day hike until it isn't. Always pack an extra layer and something waterproof, so if you got injured and were out there overnight (possibly in rainy/cold weather) you'd be OK.
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Old 09-18-2017, 05:08 PM
 
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Aredhel View Post
I'd recommend taking along this: https://www.rei.com/learn/expert-adv...ssentials.html.

Remember, it's only a short day hike until it isn't. Always pack an extra layer and something waterproof, so if you got injured and were out there overnight (possibly in rainy/cold weather) you'd be OK.
Okay that is a little extreme. We are not even sure where the OP is going or whether s/he is going to a "backcountry" hike or just a local nature trail. I will do 5 mile hikes by my own on the local nature trails and bring very little. I put on sunblock and my hiking shoes, bring a water, and that's about the extent of it because the trails are extremely popular to the extent that people are circling to try to find parking.

I do second making sure that the shoes/boots are ready to go. Heck, I just did a hike recently in well worn in shoes that are 3 years old and got blisters due to poor sock selection even though I wear the shoes at least monthly. I know some people who wear shorts and t-shirts at those temperatures. I am from N FL where there are enough bugs and ticks to merit full, lightweight skin coverage at any temperature. It is better not to wear anything skintight since that is easier for bugs to bite though. You may also want a hat for sun protection. I like to have convertible sleeves.

You will definitely want sunblock and some sort of bug repellant. Repel (non-DEET) works well over the long term unless you are going into a high-level tick area, in which case you will need the 25% DEET. If there are lots of ticks, you want to be fully covered and wear a hat.

Otherwise, bring water and a snack like trail mix or granola.
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Old 09-18-2017, 05:59 PM
 
Location: Omaha, Nebraska
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Originally Posted by RamenAddict View Post
Okay that is a little extreme. We are not even sure where the OP is going or whether s/he is going to a "backcountry" hike or just a local nature trail.
Plenty of dayhikers have died hiking "local nature trails." The usual culprit is hypothermia (think temps in the 40s-50s coupled with rain). Carrying the 10 essentials doesn't require a monster pack; they will fit easily in a daypack with room to spare. A fleece jacket, a Mylar space blanket, and an emergency rain poncho (or a large black garbage bag if you want to be really thrifty) cost little and weigh little. There's no reason not to carry them, and they can save a hiker's life.
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Old 09-18-2017, 06:44 PM
 
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Wow im scared now haha. It will be in the adirondack area, specifically mount jo. And a few other even smaller ones. I will say my biggest worry is ticks - dont know if they are in the area but i was not even thinking about getting lost or being stranded. I assume the hikes have signs and whatnot.
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Old 09-18-2017, 07:56 PM
 
Location: Omaha, Nebraska
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Quote:
Originally Posted by bell235 View Post
Wow im scared now haha. It will be in the adirondack area, specifically mount jo. And a few other even smaller ones. I will say my biggest worry is ticks - dont know if they are in the area but i was not even thinking about getting lost or being stranded. I assume the hikes have signs and whatnot.
Nobody ever sets out with the plan of becoming lost - but it happens. Trail markers can be damaged or disappear, and animal trails can intersect human-made trails. And dayhikers are disproportionately likely to get into trouble precisely because too often they don't stop to consider "what if the weather changes during my hike?" or "what if I get turned around out there?" Read over the 10 Essentials lists out there on the web and put together a small emergency kit and ALWAYS carry it with you when you hike. Trust me on this. I've had to use my kit on rare occasions; because it allowed me to keep my body core warm and dry, the stories aren't very exciting because nothing bad actually happened. And that's a good thing!

Remember weather can change drastically over the course of a few hours, and the higher up you go on a mountain, the cooler it generally gets. Carry enough layers for the conditions at the top of the trail; don't be deceived by the warmer temps at the trailhead.

Also, tell someone where you will be hiking, and when you expect to be back. That way if you're seriously overdue, someone will know, and they'll be able to tell the authorities where you might be.

As for ticks: wear long pants and long-sleeved shirts, and tuck your pants into the top of your hiking boots (or wear gaiters) to help keep ticks off. You can spray your hiking clothes with permethrin insecticide, which also helps. You can even get hiking clothes that are pre-treated with permethrin (but they can be pricy). After your hike, check over your body for ticks. They tend to like areas where clothes bind (like waistbands), and of course your scalp. It helps to have a buddy help you with a tick check, since it's hard to see places like the hairline on the back of your neck even with a mirror.
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Old 09-18-2017, 08:31 PM
 
5,617 posts, read 7,663,426 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by bell235 View Post
If this is the wrong place to post this please move it but was unsure where else to put it?

What would you recommend someone bring on a hike (nothing major, under 5 miles, probably 2-3 hour hike) if they were new to hiking? Also, what do you recommend to wear if it were going to be about 65-70 degrees.
1. Bring a printed/paper map of your intended route.
2. I don't think you must have hiking boots for under 5 miles and reasonable terrain - wait until you get into it more. But do wear good trail shoes. And good socks - i.e. light wool.
3. Bring twice as much water as you think you need.
4. Bring a bit of layering material - like a rain jacket or windbreaker. - prepare for the worst - i.e. staying out overnight.
5. a bit of emergency equipment - small first aid kit, phone, a little cash, flashlight, gps, firestarter, etc. - not necessarily all of it, but think about this a bit and bring something for things not going as planned.
6. a lot of people like to have a granola bar or something as a snack or emergency food
7. a pack to carry this stuff - keep it light and comfortable
8. consider hiking poles - they're some of the most helpful gear a hiker can use/have for any terrain.
9. camera or cell phone camera
10. consider bringing trail spikes if conditions can be icy

As for what to wear, do not wear new shoes - wear shoes you know how your feel will do in them. Wear pants - not jeans, but something like nylon - and I'd recommend a light long-sleeve shirt, sunscreen, hat/sunglasses as well. Bring something to layer if it is colder than expected or if it rains a bit. It is generally recommended to avoid cottons but a cotton shirt is fine for a small hike like this usually.

And as others have said, let someone know of your itinerary.
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Old 09-18-2017, 10:45 PM
 
Location: U.S.A., Earth
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Quote:
Originally Posted by bell235 View Post
If this is the wrong place to post this please move it but was unsure where else to put it?

What would you recommend someone bring on a hike (nothing major, under 5 miles, probably 2-3 hour hike) if they were new to hiking? Also, what do you recommend to wear if it were going to be about 65-70 degrees.
Are you going with a group, or by yourself?
If the former, make sure they're not expecting you to keep a grueling pace. Some of the public hiking trips I go to have a scale of 1 to 10, and a brief description of each. If you're not as physically fit or on the older side, scale back accordingly. I'd assume the trip can take up to 4 to 5 hours if the guide gets lost. Speaking of which, the host/leader... does they know the trail? Have they done it before? Consider going online to read reviews on it.
If the latter, the cons here are there's no one to look after you, no buddy system, etc. At least you go on your own pace. PAY ATTENTION SO YOU DON'T GET LOST! This is why it may behoove you to add an extra hour or 2 just in case. Also why you should pack extra water. With water, at least you're consuming it as you go, so they'll get empty and won't weigh you down.


For future hikes, try to get the elevation gain. For me, I'm not in shape, so anything above 3,000 ft. in elevation gain will be a workout. For you, determine this from online reviews are research online.






Quote:
Originally Posted by bell235 View Post
Wow im scared now haha. It will be in the adirondack area, specifically mount jo. And a few other even smaller ones. I will say my biggest worry is ticks - dont know if they are in the area but i was not even thinking about getting lost or being stranded. I assume the hikes have signs and whatnot.
The better way to describe this is when people drive to work, go shopping, etc., you're not expecting to get into an accident, nor die. It hardly happens. Ditto if you commute by foot through a metropolitan area (walking on streets with many cars, being on subway platforms, etc.). With hiking, you have to be a bit extra careful, in different ways. Make sure you don't get lost, not landmarks you pass through.


Layer your clothing, travel on the lighter side, have snacks for energy, etc. Starting off with a lighter hike is indeed a good start. Go from there to gauge your level and interest.
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Old 09-19-2017, 04:23 AM
 
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Thanks! very helpful
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