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Old 10-17-2018, 01:23 PM
 
118 posts, read 28,801 times
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in CNY, the deer population has absolutely exploded, along with deer ticks, creating a near epidemic of debilitating and potentially crippling Lyme disease. Last fall, for the first time in my long life, I found a deer tick attached to my upper arm. I was tested for Lyme disease, fortunately it was negative. I can't remember being as concerned about any other wild creature in my neck of the woods.
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Old 10-17-2018, 01:29 PM
 
Location: Nantahala National Forest, NC
27,091 posts, read 6,884,296 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Archer10X View Post
in CNY, the deer population has absolutely exploded, along with deer ticks, creating a near epidemic of debilitating and potentially crippling Lyme disease. Last fall, for the first time in my long life, I found a deer tick attached to my upper arm. I was tested for Lyme disease, fortunately it was negative. I can't remember being as concerned about any other wild creature in my neck of the woods.

Certainly understand that...cover up and do the tick search when you get home.
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Old 10-17-2018, 02:02 PM
 
Location: Swiftwater, PA
15,894 posts, read 12,695,051 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Archer10X View Post
in CNY, the deer population has absolutely exploded, along with deer ticks, creating a near epidemic of debilitating and potentially crippling Lyme disease. Last fall, for the first time in my long life, I found a deer tick attached to my upper arm. I was tested for Lyme disease, fortunately it was negative. I can't remember being as concerned about any other wild creature in my neck of the woods.
We tend to blame the deer since we named them "deer ticks". But that is not really the case: https://www.sciencedaily.com/release...0721072829.htm. I quote: "A dense population of deer contributes overall to more cases of Lyme disease. This is mainly because the deer are a good host for the ticks. However, the relationship is not very strong."

Here is another link that places more blame on the small mammals: https://www.wiscontext.org/small-mam...g-lyme-disease.
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Old 10-17-2018, 02:17 PM
 
Location: Swiftwater, PA
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Quote:
Originally Posted by greatblueheron View Post
Certainly understand that...cover up and do the tick search when you get home.
We found one on my wife onetime. What is scary is the size of the female nymphs; they are very, very, small. We did not know it was a tick until I pulled it off with tweezers, put it on a white sheet of paper, and then looked at it with a six inch lit magnifying glass. Then we still were not sure until it moved! It would be very easy for somebody to miss any of these ticks "nymphs" attached to them. Then, when you do have your specimen and can place it safely in an old medicine bottle; try to find somebody to identify it! Its not easy; most doctors do not want their patients dragging in creepy crawly ticks into their offices. Hospitals are not that quick either. We found that the local college will identify them; but that is only an identification and a guess how long it has been feeding on the host and it does not mean you were infected by the disease. So they will send your specimen, for about $100, to a lab to see if it carries the disease. But that will take a week to ten days. If the tick has been feeding on you for over 36 hours you should start the antibiotic treatment immediately (if it was infected); but you don't know until it is too late.

It really isn't too late; but it makes the treatment more difficult as time goes on. Fortunately the deer nymph we found on my wife came back negative. But the process of identifying and treatment has a long ways to go before they perfect it. I just hope that someday they will again have a vaccine against the Lyme disease.
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Old 10-17-2018, 02:28 PM
 
Location: North Idaho
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Actual fear? Not much, unless you are talking about being out in their element, then it would be polar bears and the big hungry sharks.

Surprise! We aren't the top of the food chain after all.

I've got a lot of respect for the poisonous snakes and I find the biting and stinging bugs to be irritating not frightening.
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Old 10-18-2018, 07:47 AM
 
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That's true, mice, raccoons, squirrels etc. also transport ticks around the habitat.
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Old 10-20-2018, 07:38 PM
 
Location: NW Nevada
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Spiders are a critter that I used to be quite freaked out by when I was young. So what'd I do? Became a plumber so I could share the same space with them. LOL. I've been bit several times by black widows over the years. I got deathly sick the first time. Subsequent bites have been pretty mild. I've tangled with spiders ,scorpions,vinagararoons, been made quite miserable by red ants as well.


I studied up on spiders and learned how to avoid getting bit finally. Never been snakebit. I don't have much real fear of any critters much anymore. I do have a healthy respect for mountain lions. But if I'm anywhere I'm likely to run into one I make sure I'm prepared. There ain't any better early warning system for cats like a horse. They will pick up on a cat being around even faster than a dog will.
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Old 10-20-2018, 10:27 PM
 
Location: Approximately 50 miles from Missoula MT/38 yrs full time after 4 yrs part time
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Quote:
Originally Posted by NVplumber;5342000........snipet......:. I do have a healthy respect for mountain lions. But if I'm anywhere I'm likely to run into one I make sure I'm prepared. [[[[[[[There ain't any better early warning system for cats like a horse.
]]]]]] They will pick up on a cat being around even faster than a dog will.
.........The sentence above in brackets [[......]] , is 100 % correct and irrefutable........"been in that situation/done that!!!!!!!

Many years ago during the early part of elk season, I was on horseback, about 11a.m., just slowly walking my horse across a very large (approx 100 acres), high-mountain meadow about 14 miles outside of Steamboat Springs CO. Elevation about 7800 feet........this meadow was about 90% native range grass, just a few trees and about every 100 yards there were dense clumps of heavy thick brush approx 20 to 25 feet in dia. The trail I was on missed most of these dense brushy areas by 50 to 60 yrds and with the slow methodical walking pace of the horse....bright sunlight and temp about 30°F.........I was almost being lulled into a kinda groggy state of mind.
The trail was coming up on one of these brushy areas and would be as close as maybe 10 t0 12 yards .

ALL OF A SUDDEN, the horse e x p l o d e d and jumped sideways off the trail........AND at that moment a large adult mountain lion came flying-out-of-that-brush like it's AZZ was on fire!!!!!!! I would say he was close to 8 to 9 feet from nose to tip of tail.

I was stunned and had my hands full of a very frightened horse!!....
I've had similar situations occur with deer and twice with bobcats.........but nothing compared to spooking that mountain lion.

Great memories of various situations that have happened while on some of those solo horseback hunts.
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Old 10-21-2018, 08:46 AM
 
Location: NW Nevada
15,130 posts, read 12,267,061 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Montana Griz View Post
.........The sentence above in brackets [[......]] , is 100 % correct and irrefutable........"been in that situation/done that!!!!!!!

Many years ago during the early part of elk season, I was on horseback, about 11a.m., just slowly walking my horse across a very large (approx 100 acres), high-mountain meadow about 14 miles outside of Steamboat Springs CO. Elevation about 7800 feet........this meadow was about 90% native range grass, just a few trees and about every 100 yards there were dense clumps of heavy thick brush approx 20 to 25 feet in dia. The trail I was on missed most of these dense brushy areas by 50 to 60 yrds and with the slow methodical walking pace of the horse....bright sunlight and temp about 30°F.........I was almost being lulled into a kinda groggy state of mind.
The trail was coming up on one of these brushy areas and would be as close as maybe 10 t0 12 yards .

ALL OF A SUDDEN, the horse e x p l o d e d and jumped sideways off the trail........AND at that moment a large adult mountain lion came flying-out-of-that-brush like it's AZZ was on fire!!!!!!! I would say he was close to 8 to 9 feet from nose to tip of tail.

I was stunned and had my hands full of a very frightened horse!!....
I've had similar situations occur with deer and twice with bobcats.........but nothing compared to spooking that mountain lion.

Great memories of various situations that have happened while on some of those solo horseback hunts.

I've never hunted solo on horseback. But I have been separated and off by myself gathering strays. When my horse gets balky out in the wilds I listen with both ears. Horses also will let you know in no uncertain terms if a cat is sneaking your campsite. Either hunting or out on gathers when our horses are picketed at night someone is always on watch. Any rides for any purpose that have camping involved we don't do solo.


It's an eerie feeling when out of the blue your horses just start acting like they've been hit with a hotshot. Nostrils all flared up, eyes all buggy and ears either pinned back or straight forward or both. Snort, snot stamp and blow up against the leads. And even though it's the picket guards job to keep the fire stoked a fire does not deter a cat from creeping your camp. Same with coyotes but the horses don't get near as stressed about the latter.


Another interesting tidbit for those who don't know is the Hollywood scene of horses losing their minds at a rattler buzzing is pure fiction. In to many snake encounters on horseback to count I've never seen I happen. Horses could care less about snakes. I've had rattlers sound off right under my horse and not even prick their ears at the sound.


At one trail riding event I was at one of the obstacles in the arena was a couple rattlers in box. They were all buzzy and the horses just sauntered on by unperturbed. However when one savvy horseman hung a cat hide at the arena entrance not one horse would even enter. It was a good trail obstacle idea ...BUT...a bit to much. lol. A cat encounter will give you a real fast lesson in how to collect a spooked animal.
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Old 10-21-2018, 08:53 AM
 
Location: Denver, CO
23,597 posts, read 10,782,374 times
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Grizzly Bears, and Polar Bears. Grizzlies will kill you if they feel threatened, or they think their cubs are threatened. Polar Bears will STALK YOU as prey. I had friends (young couple) eaten by a Grizzly Bear as they slept in their tent in Glacier National Park. Ever since then, if I go to Griz country, I am prepared, and hyper aware. A good dog with you helps a lot as they will smell them, and hear them way before you do.
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