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Old 10-03-2017, 11:27 AM
 
Location: New York Area
18,432 posts, read 7,287,451 times
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In downtown White Plains I saw an animal that was 97% wolf harnessed to a blind person, helping them navigate the streets of the city.
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Old 10-03-2017, 11:29 AM
 
Location: Nantahala National Forest, NC
27,091 posts, read 6,884,296 times
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Are their cougars left in FL??




UOTE=Ron61;49703781]Squirrels, rabbits, coyotes, bobcats, alligators, snakes of every sort, and birds of all kinds.[/quote]
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Old 10-03-2017, 11:34 AM
 
Location: Nantahala National Forest, NC
27,091 posts, read 6,884,296 times
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You made my day with your post....just excellent.

Glad you took time to dig the puddle

ps never seen black-billed cuckoo
but happy you did



TE=guidoLaMoto;49706444]I moved to rural WI a year ago, so we have an abundance of the wild life Vund in the typical mid-west oak/hickory climax forest. We've seen more than 40 species of birds on our property, from the common sparrows to wild turkey, sandhill cranes, bald eagles and black billed cuckoo. It's thrilling to see bright red cardinals, brilliant orange Balt. orioles and Gold Finches all jockeying for position at the feeders at the same time.

Plenty of snakes, frogs & toads- I'm amazed how the frogs & toads found the little puddle I dug to develop a spring 400 yds up a 30% grade from the nearest stream to lay their eggs.

No bears near here, but wolves were reported to have taken a calve in our county last year and neighbors have spotted at least two mountain lions, wandering loners no doubt, in recent years.

It's common to see as many as 12 turkey vultures soaring over head at the same time (are they just playing, riding the up-drafts from our hills, or are they keeping an eye on me, now that I'm getting a little older?)

I moved from suburban Chicago where we were located just 6 miles from Midway Airport adjacent to the Forest Preserve. It was not unusual to see complacent coyotes meandering down our street and deer often walked up to the bedroom window like it was the BurgerKing drive-up. I would trap about 2 dozen 'coons & skunks each year in my barn (2/3rd acre mini-farm with 2 horses, 20 chickens & a Juliana pig) and re-locate them to the forest.




I like that comment. "Appreciation" is the key to enjoying Nature and trying to preserve it. Many of us try to preserve it by gardening, restoring habitat, etc, but maybe we can do even more good by trying to cultivate "appreciation" in others.

I like to compare rainbows to the concept of "God." A group of people can all point to "the same" rainbow at the same time and simultaneously appreciate it. But a rainbow isn't a tangible object. It's an optical illusion. And we each see our our own, personal rainbow. Does that make it any less "real?"[/quote]
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Old 10-03-2017, 11:42 AM
 
Location: Nantahala National Forest, NC
27,091 posts, read 6,884,296 times
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Several months ago, thought I spotted a rabid fox...now I think it was a coyote that I did not realize was found here. (animal control did not make it in time and he wandered off...close to death with foaming at the mouth...very sad).

Another is the wild boar...hope I NEVER see this guy in the wild, although any other animal is fine...would be terrified
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Old 10-03-2017, 12:30 PM
 
10,928 posts, read 8,991,667 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by greatblueheron View Post
Several months ago, thought I spotted a rabid fox...now I think it was a coyote that I did not realize was found here. (animal control did not make it in time and he wandered off...close to death with foaming at the mouth...very sad).

Another is the wild boar...hope I NEVER see this guy in the wild, although any other animal is fine...would be terrified
I saw four European wild boar in Cade's Cove in the Great Smoky Mountains National Park just last week - the first I'd ever seen there, these were young ones, perhaps litter mates.

The boars had randomly rototilled a field located about two-thirds of the way around the one-way loop road, and were nonchalantly poking around, very close to the fence beside said road. Usually, the boars emerge at dawn or in the early evening - these four were busy at midday, in a very heavily visited area.

The Park Service is trying to get rid of them, as they are highly destructive, reproduce rapidly and in great number, and are non-native - but they're also highly intelligent. The park's population of wild boars is estimated to number several thousand.
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Old 10-03-2017, 12:49 PM
 
Location: on the wind
9,585 posts, read 4,260,402 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by 17thAndK View Post
Here in DC, we can sometimes spot an orange-crested booby.
I once heard a similar phenomena identified as a "vulgar barking yam".
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Old 10-03-2017, 12:54 PM
 
Location: on the wind
9,585 posts, read 4,260,402 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by greatblueheron View Post
Wow

Another lucky, lucky person....have you seen a wolverine in the wild??? That would be scary.


if you have puffins I have an idea where you might be...use to be a die hard birder....saw them once on a visit and a little minke whale.

You invite, I will come


[/b]
Yes, I've been lucky enough to see wolverines in the wild 3 times in 30 years. They are extremely secretive and smart. No way would I ever get close enough to mess with one.
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Old 10-03-2017, 01:08 PM
 
Location: on the wind
9,585 posts, read 4,260,402 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by ipaper View Post
I guess you would have to go deep into the woods to find tadpoles these days. I hardly ever see frogs anymore as well.
Unfortunately, in addition to classic habitat loss, development, pollution, and climate change (warmer and drier climate reduces wetlands), the fungal disease chytridiomycosis has wiped out frogs just about world wide. It is an aquatic fungus that coexisted with African clawed frogs native to specific water temperatures. It is more active in cooler temps, so heat in its natural African range kept it in check. These frogs were exported world wide in the 50's for pregnancy testing and research. Labs just flushed the frogs and their water down drains, infecting water bodies everywhere. Then commercial frog breeding farms and exotic amphibian pet trade spread it even farther. Amphibians in cooler aquatic habitats have no natural tolerance to the fungus and are being wiped out. For some species the mortality approaches 98%. Some research is finding small percentages of native species survive due to resistance, but it may not be fast enough for the species to survive. There is an effective treatment for individual mildly infected frogs (been there with my Malaysian leaf frogs), but no broadcast treatment for lakes, rivers, etc.
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Old 10-03-2017, 02:28 PM
 
Location: Nantahala National Forest, NC
27,091 posts, read 6,884,296 times
Reputation: 30347
Thanks,CraigCreek...

what do I do if I spot an adult close to me...not run, like with bears???






[/b]
Quote:
Originally Posted by CraigCreek View Post
I saw four European wild boar in Cade's Cove in the Great Smoky Mountains National Park just last week - the first I'd ever seen there, these were young ones, perhaps litter mates.

The boars had randomly rototilled a field located about two-thirds of the way around the one-way loop road, and were nonchalantly poking around, very close to the fence beside said road. Usually, the boars emerge at dawn or in the early evening - these four were busy at midday, in a very heavily visited area.

The Park Service is trying to get rid of them, as they are highly destructive, reproduce rapidly and in great number, and are non-native - but they're also highly intelligent. The park's population of wild boars is estimated to number several thousand.
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Old 10-03-2017, 02:31 PM
 
Location: Nantahala National Forest, NC
27,091 posts, read 6,884,296 times
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Thank you, AllisonHB...for the sad but informative post




[/b]
Quote:
Originally Posted by AllisonHB View Post
Unfortunately, in addition to classic habitat loss, development, pollution, and climate change (warmer and drier climate reduces wetlands), the fungal disease chytridiomycosis has wiped out frogs just about world wide. It is an aquatic fungus that coexisted with African clawed frogs native to specific water temperatures. It is more active in cooler temps, so heat in its natural African range kept it in check. These frogs were exported world wide in the 50's for pregnancy testing and research. Labs just flushed the frogs and their water down drains, infecting water bodies everywhere. Then commercial frog breeding farms and exotic amphibian pet trade spread it even farther. Amphibians in cooler aquatic habitats have no natural tolerance to the fungus and are being wiped out. For some species the mortality approaches 98%. Some research is finding small percentages of native species survive due to resistance, but it may not be fast enough for the species to survive. There is an effective treatment for individual mildly infected frogs (been there with my Malaysian leaf frogs), but no broadcast treatment for lakes, rivers, etc.
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