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Old 10-21-2017, 09:04 AM
 
Location: Jewel Lake (Sagle) Idaho
30,103 posts, read 18,949,985 times
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Too many wolves, griz and coyotes.

Not enough elk. Quail are making a comeback. Almost overrun with turkeys and plenty of moose.
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Old 10-21-2017, 09:20 AM
 
Location: Raleigh
8,091 posts, read 6,362,051 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Calvert Hall '62 View Post
1) Pheasant. Really miss these guys, the last one spotted was 30 years ago as it was hit by a car while crossing the road. I guess hunters and foxes have wiped them out. Miss their appearance and the male's truncated version of "****-a-doodle do."

2) White tails. Sorry Bambi-philes but they are just dangerous pests. Around here they have been responsible for a number of traffic mishaps including at least two human fatalities.
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Pheasants are not native American birds as I recall. They were introduced to this country as game birds for hunting. We won.
I think there was a disease that wiped them out in the Eastern USA.
A little time on line reveals there are farms raising and selling them, so maybe you need to order some and raise them yourself. I recall a cousin raising them on his farm for the Fall hunt.

There are more white tail deer in America than any other time in history. Just a reminder, Bambi was a buck.
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Old 10-21-2017, 11:26 AM
 
Location: NW Nevada
15,177 posts, read 12,292,697 times
Reputation: 14007
Quote:
Originally Posted by Calvert Hall '62 View Post
1) Pheasant. Really miss these guys, the last one spotted was 30 years ago as it was hit by a car while crossing the road. I guess hunters and foxes have wiped them out. Miss their appearance and the male's truncated version of "****-a-doodle do."

2) White tails. Sorry Bambi-philes but they are just dangerous pests. Around here they have been responsible for a number of traffic mishaps including at least two human fatalities.

Males can act nutty, especially this time of year.

There was the time we heard a loud crash. A window downstairs was cracked and nearby was a deer walking like it was drunk. He obviously saw his reflection and didn't like it.

One who had a slight limp spent a lot a time under the deck. State authorities were not helpful when called. The biggest problem was that he harassed my late wife when she was in her flower garden. Growing bolder and he got increasingly closer each day. He'd make charges at her and then suddenly stop.

I was on the deck and he was directly below. I dropped a barbell plate but he was able to dodge it, but he got the message, spending the next few days down below by the pond, before wandering off.

About 40 years ago, I was looking over the fields when hearing a noise behind me. Turned and there was a large male charging. When he was about 20 yds. away, he suddenly veered left. Lucky me.

Late wife's niece lives in a crowded development on a cul-de-sac, in a heavily-populated DC suburb. Last place you'd expect deer trouble even though her street backs up to a small local park. None of the residents plant flowers or vegetables. Why go to the trouble when the deer eat damn near everything? Everyone just has grass in their yards.

Go away Bambi.

WE don't have White Tails here. We have Muley's. And bucks in rut should not be taken lightly. Here in Carson City where I unfortunately currently reside deer in town are an everyday event. But their population is nowhere near as dense as White Tails are in many places. The time I spent in WV was a wildlife culture shock for me. With deer and turkeys. The turkeys were the worse. Friggin' toms would come at you and just get to flogging. I had to put the boots to a few overly bold tom turkeys. But not everyone is as physically capable of doing that. Elderly and disabled people don't have that option and a big tom flogging you isn't a pleasant experience to have to sit there and take.


That said, I would not want to see either species just up and disappear. They taste to good. But in many places they are in fact become pests as well as game animals. I would open up depradation hunts to out of state folks for a very reasonable tag and license fee. With copious bag limits. My son and I would be happy to hit WV again and fill our freezers with venison and turkey. Hell, folks who live there take both deer and turkey whenever they feel like it as it is. Hunting season? What's that? I was actually given that as an answer to my queries about that when I first landed there.


When we went out on horse back with friends, which was another culture shock to my son and I as NV born and bred ranch types used to big sky, I took to taking my Marlin 94 in 45 Colt and someone else always had a 22 mag, and we would come back with deer, turkey or both every ride. Whatever time of year it was. And the wildlife authorities just didn't care a fart in a high wind so long as we were eating what we took. And still both species are thick as molasses in Winter. The wildlife dept even introduced coyotes to try and thin things down. Which was something as a native Nevadan I thought was a serious mistake, and my trepidations proved founded.


All that resulted in (as I knew it would) is a thriving yote population that has become a serious pest as well. Locally in my home state anywhere in the state the only species I would see just disappear are certain insects and maybe some arachnids and arthropods. Mosquitoes, biting fly's, venomous to humans spiders and scorpions, and the Mojave Green rattler. Though I have had my ...disagreements..with Mountain Lions and coyotes I would not see them disappear. But we have plenty of room to share. This is a big , open country. It's a fairly simple matter to get predators to respect boundaries. We expect a certain amount of predator loss running livestock. When it goes over that limit then we get serious.


I can see the OPs position regarding the deer in his area and I have experienced such issues myself. But to see these animals just go away? That's a bit much. I'm not putting feral hogs into this scenario since they don't qualify (not to me anyway) as "wild life". They're living and they're wild but the term "feral" denotes they are an invasive species, just as I look at feral dogs here. There should be no classifying them as managed game animals. The only state that does so that I know of is CA. That's because they figured out how many people were hunting them and the state saw a new revenue source. Leave it to CA to leave no stone unturned where taxes and fees are concerned.
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