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Old 12-29-2017, 08:00 PM
 
Location: the heart is!
4,635 posts, read 4,019,990 times
Reputation: 10120

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I came across this and wanted to share it. This man is remarkable in his dedication and determination to make a better climate. Besides here in the U.S. he is also working across the globe to do the same thing in other countries.

One Man’s Mission to Revive the Last Redwood Forests

David Milarch's near-death experience inspired a personal quest: to archive the genetics of the world's largest trees before they're gone. This short film from The Story Group documents his effort to save the redwood champions of Northern California from the effects of climate change.

https://video.nationalgeographic.com...edwood-forests

Last edited by HomeIsWhere...; 12-29-2017 at 08:29 PM.. Reason: spelling
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Old 01-04-2018, 05:43 PM
 
Location: Seattle WA, USA
4,318 posts, read 2,573,693 times
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They should be planted on the entire pacific coast, not just Oregon. They grow here in Seattle quite well.

https://www.google.com/maps/@47.3520...7i13312!8i6656

Also sequoias grow well here too.
https://www.google.com/maps/@47.3295...7i13312!8i6656
https://www.google.com/maps/@47.3251...7i13312!8i6656
https://www.google.com/maps/@47.3327...7i13312!8i6656
https://www.google.com/maps/@47.4707...7i13312!8i6656

They are grown as ornamental plants here in the Seattle area, but I think they should be introduced in the wild here too, particularly in the rainforests along the coast.

For instance I think they would absolutely thrive in La Push

Cresent City, CA is wet too, but the summer drought is much drier and lasts much longer.
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Old 01-05-2018, 06:14 AM
 
Location: Canada
6,207 posts, read 4,621,552 times
Reputation: 17192
I've been to the Avenue of the Giants and that forest is just incredible. It is so sickening that loggers way back when, cut them down for building without a thought for the future. They have done, and I believe are still doing the same thing on the east coast of Canada. Whole mountainsides, just clear-cut.

Like a lot of things in the past, they had no foresight to see or understand how even small things (in their minds) affect the whole earth.

The sad thing is, I'm afraid that in 50 to 100 years if the earth is still a living planet, they will say the same about this day and age and how we didn't do NEARLY enough to preserve our natural world.
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Old 01-06-2018, 02:16 AM
 
Location: the heart is!
4,635 posts, read 4,019,990 times
Reputation: 10120
Quote:
Originally Posted by grega94 View Post
They should be planted on the entire pacific coast, not just Oregon. They grow here in Seattle quite well.

They are grown as ornamental plants here in the Seattle area, but I think they should be introduced in the wild here too, particularly in the rainforests along the coast.

For instance I think they would absolutely thrive in

La Push

Cresent City, CA is wet too, but the summer drought is much drier and lasts much longer.
Stay Tuned...

Honestly I haven't read anything (and I research a lot) about where else in the U.S. David Milarch plans on planting these trees but you're right he should consider the entire pacific coast. Having said that I don't know what the protocol would be in getting the various Local, State and Federal to allow and cooperate with such a venture.

I know from the video that he is working on replacing trees in nine different countries. Also, there has been a book recently authored by Jim Robbins, on his work. The Man Who Plants Trees

https://www.goodreads.com/book/show/...o-plants-trees

However, he's not the only one working on the restoration of trees on mother earth. There's a young man, Felix Finkbeiner from south of Munich, Germany who is making it his goal to plant a trillion trees. Plant-for-the-planet is an environmental group he founded with the U.N. He started when he was 9 years old and is now in college at the University of London, if I recall correctly).

“If you let a monkey choose if he wants one banana now or six bananas later, the monkey will always choose the one banana now,” he said. “From this, we children understood we cannot trust that adults alone will save our future. To do that, we have to take our future in our hands.”

https://news.nationalgeographic.com/...rillion-trees/
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Old 01-06-2018, 02:41 AM
 
Location: the heart is!
4,635 posts, read 4,019,990 times
Reputation: 10120
Quote:
Originally Posted by gouligann View Post
I've been to the Avenue of the Giants and that forest is just incredible. It is so sickening that loggers way back when, cut them down for building without a thought for the future. They have done, and I believe are still doing the same thing on the east coast of Canada. Whole mountainsides, just clear-cut.

Like a lot of things in the past, they had no foresight to see or understand how even small things (in their minds) affect the whole earth.

The sad thing is, I'm afraid that in 50 to 100 years if the earth is still a living planet, they will say the same about this day and age and how we didn't do NEARLY enough to preserve our natural world.
I apologize for not getting back to you sooner (as well as grega94) I hadn't realized that anyone had acknowledged my post, let alone replied to it.

I too am appalled in reading about previously forested lands and the complete stripping of these natural resources. In any event, there is a great deal of work on behalf of reforestation of trees, both here in the U.S, as well as other countries and I cannot imagine there would not be something for and on behalf of Canada, another beautiful country with gorgeous, natural beauty everywhere.

In my research I came across a young man who started out as a child of 9 (I believe) who is now in college but still carrying on and promoting stewardship of this endeavor here in the U.S. and abroad. This young man is on a mission and is not waiting for the adults to do it. He has taken the challenge and is intent to plant a trillion trees throughout the world. I applaud him!

If you'd like, read the reply I posted to grega94 and see if there's an opportunity or stewardship for anyone you may know who is a school aged student who may want to get involved on behalf of Canada. There may already be something in place that I have not come across myself and I would think there absolutely must be. I will continue to see where it's all going and may try to get involved as well myself.

Besides my dogs, I have always had a fondness and affinity for trees, birds and elephants. I have no idea why???
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Old 01-06-2018, 01:52 PM
 
6,637 posts, read 2,741,963 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by gouligann View Post
I've been to the Avenue of the Giants and that forest is just incredible. It is so sickening that loggers way back when, cut them down for building without a thought for the future. They have done, and I believe are still doing the same thing on the east coast of Canada. Whole mountainsides, just clear-cut.
When I was a kid I read a book about logging in California. It was a major industry there and little of the original forests remain anywhere. What's even worse is when they cut a lot of these trees down they ruined the wood. If you have a 250ft tall Sequoia it's fine just standing there the way it's meant to. If you fall that tree wrong it shatters when it hits the ground. Thousands of these giants were cut down and simply left to rot because the trees shattered when they hit the ground. There's a science to falling trees now, there's technology to do it with too. Back then there wasn't.

I think this is a brilliant idea.
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Old 01-07-2018, 12:53 AM
 
Location: Seattle WA, USA
4,318 posts, read 2,573,693 times
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from a timber industry point of view what is considered higher quality wood, redwood or Douglas fir? I would think that Redwood is more economical since you don't have to replant the trees you cut down since they grow back. Why aren't redwoods planted more for the timber industry? Or is that the tree they particularly use in California?

In Washington they plant huge forests/plantations of douglas fir and then clear cut them every 30 or 50 years, and then replant it all.
https://www.google.com/maps/@47.1701...7i13312!8i6656

Seems like the same thing happens in California too.
https://www.google.com/maps/@40.9309...7i13312!8i6656

why doesn't the lumber industry plant redwoods?
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Old 01-07-2018, 07:03 AM
 
6,637 posts, read 2,741,963 times
Reputation: 7033
Quote:
Originally Posted by grega94 View Post
from a timber industry point of view what is considered higher quality wood, redwood or Douglas fir? I would think that Redwood is more economical since you don't have to replant the trees you cut down since they grow back. Why aren't redwoods planted more for the timber industry? Or is that the tree they particularly use in California?

In Washington they plant huge forests/plantations of douglas fir and then clear cut them every 30 or 50 years, and then replant it all.
https://www.google.com/maps/@47.1701...7i13312!8i6656

Seems like the same thing happens in California too.
https://www.google.com/maps/@40.9309...7i13312!8i6656

why doesn't the lumber industry plant redwoods?
Different trees wood has different characteristics. Willow is very flexible, as is cedar. I think Douglas Fir is a much stronger wood that can be milled more easily than others and much more suitable for building. Somebody here probably knows more than me. Douglas Fir, Hemlock and pines are all highlly desirable as building materials.
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Old 01-07-2018, 07:20 AM
 
Location: LI,NY zone 7a
2,217 posts, read 1,321,161 times
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My guess is growth rate is the reason. You can harvest much more doug fir, as opposed to redwood in a given time.

edit: Also redwood is not good structural wise.

Last edited by LIcenter; 01-07-2018 at 07:30 AM..
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Old 01-07-2018, 08:42 AM
 
Location: A noncontiguous State
4,439 posts, read 2,393,265 times
Reputation: 5308
Quote:
Originally Posted by grega94 View Post
They should be planted on the entire pacific coast, not just Oregon. They grow here in Seattle quite well.
Interesting idea. Pretty sure they wouldn't grow in SE Alaska though.

I'm personally more interested in seeing large stands of old growth red cedar and doug fir returning to Washington. There are accounts of Douglas Fir standing just about as tall as coastal redwoods back in the day-over 300 ft.
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