U.S. CitiesCity-Data Forum Index
Covid-19 Information Page
Go Back   City-Data Forum > General Forums > Nature
 [Register]
Please register to participate in our discussions with 2 million other members - it's free and quick! Some forums can only be seen by registered members. After you create your account, you'll be able to customize options and access all our 15,000 new posts/day with fewer ads.
View detailed profile (Advanced) or search
site with Google Custom Search

Search Forums  (Advanced)
Reply Start New Thread
 
Old 03-03-2018, 04:39 PM
 
Location: Nantahala National Forest, NC
27,091 posts, read 6,884,296 times
Reputation: 30347

Advertisements

Quote:
Originally Posted by AllisonHB View Post
Woodpeckers developed a skill/physical ability that enabled them to take advantage of a food source that other birds could not. Instead of competing directly with the other birds "getting insects off the ground", they avoided competition....going after the insects trying to stay hidden under bark. That's what evolution does. Ensuring survival by avoiding competition and exploiting a different source of food. An amazingly beautiful and diverse world resulted.


It is indeed, literally, a beautiful world.
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message

 
Old 03-03-2018, 08:35 PM
 
Location: Gray Court, SC
3,505 posts, read 2,611,236 times
Reputation: 3845
We have one that comes around every year. Hes has done pecked the top of the power pole so much it looks like Bart Simpsons hair!
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
 
Old 03-04-2018, 03:53 PM
 
Location: British Columbia ~🌄 ☀️ ♥ 🍁 ♥ ☀️🌄~
8,656 posts, read 7,411,353 times
Reputation: 17907
Quote:
Originally Posted by Aredhel View Post
Say hello to the Acorn Woodpecker!

Thanks for posting that. What a fascinating social structure they have.


.
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
 
Old 03-06-2018, 09:42 AM
 
Location: Swiftwater, PA
15,899 posts, read 12,695,051 times
Reputation: 11943
Quote:
Originally Posted by Crashj007 View Post
They will not kill your trees. They peck when they hear insects which are their sustenance. They are hunting bugs beneath the bark, dead trees or live ones.
https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Woodpecker
While they are 'hunting bugs' they can do considerable damage to T1-11. Of course some of that damage is because of bugs under/in the siding. Some of the damage I am not too sure about. I have deliberately stained our house with stain that contains insecticides to thwart the hungry woodpeckers - it doesn't work. They especially liked our corner molding and I replaced that with cedar molding - it still did not work. I keep wood putty on hand and plenty of stain to immediately repair the damage - but they are one big pain! One interesting note is that they seem to only peck on the one southern facing wall of our house - I have no idea why?

As another poster pointed out; they can also peck on aluminum rain gutter and roofing. My feeling is that it is simply a mating call. When the sun first rises they love to make the sound of a jackhammer on the gutter. The Northern Flickers are the biggest offenders and the loudest. It is amazing how loud one little woodpecker can be when it really uses it's head!

As far as never killing trees; has anybody ever witnessed six Pileated Woodpeckers on one tree? A powerful chain saw doesn't throw that much wood or sawdust.
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
 
Old 03-06-2018, 09:55 AM
 
Location: Nantahala National Forest, NC
27,091 posts, read 6,884,296 times
Reputation: 30347
Quote:
Originally Posted by fisheye View Post
While they are 'hunting bugs' they can do considerable damage to T1-11. Of course some of that damage is because of bugs under/in the siding. Some of the damage I am not too sure about. I have deliberately stained our house with stain that contains insecticides to thwart the hungry woodpeckers - it doesn't work. They especially liked our corner molding and I replaced that with cedar molding - it still did not work. I keep wood putty on hand and plenty of stain to immediately repair the damage - but they are one big pain! One interesting note is that they seem to only peck on the one southern facing wall of our house - I have no idea why?

As another poster pointed out; they can also peck on aluminum rain gutter and roofing. My feeling is that it is simply a mating call. When the sun first rises they love to make the sound of a jackhammer on the gutter. The Northern Flickers are the biggest offenders and the loudest. It is amazing how loud one little woodpecker can be when it really uses it's head!

As far as never killing trees; has anybody ever witnessed six Pileated Woodpeckers on one tree? A powerful chain saw doesn't throw that much wood or sawdust.

Six Pileateds..? No, but have seen the piles of wood/sawdust (pecking dust?) below my trees that they frequent...
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
 
Old 03-07-2018, 04:23 AM
 
Location: Swiftwater, PA
15,899 posts, read 12,695,051 times
Reputation: 11943
Quote:
Originally Posted by greatblueheron View Post
Six Pileateds..? No, but have seen the piles of wood/sawdust (pecking dust?) below my trees that they frequent...
The tree they were on was very short. It caught out attention because to the wood flying off the tree and then we counted woodpeckers. Before that we have witnessed two on one tree; but never a group like that one. I have no idea if it was a family picnic or tribal powwow? Perhaps they just found something tasty and the word got out? I would be interested in hearing if anybody else has ever seen a group of the large Pileateds like that?

Pileated woodpeckers seem to have made a recovery in my area. I don't ever remember seeing as many growing up. I just hope they never take up house pecking!
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
 
Old 03-07-2018, 06:37 AM
 
Location: Nantahala National Forest, NC
27,091 posts, read 6,884,296 times
Reputation: 30347
Quote:
Originally Posted by fisheye View Post
The tree they were on was very short. It caught out attention because to the wood flying off the tree and then we counted woodpeckers. Before that we have witnessed two on one tree; but never a group like that one. I have no idea if it was a family picnic or tribal powwow? Perhaps they just found something tasty and the word got out? I would be interested in hearing if anybody else has ever seen a group of the large Pileateds like that?

Pileated woodpeckers seem to have made a recovery in my area. I don't ever remember seeing as many growing up. I just hope they never take up house pecking!

AllisonHB would know about the Pileateds...
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
 
Old 03-07-2018, 06:38 AM
 
Location: Nantahala National Forest, NC
27,091 posts, read 6,884,296 times
Reputation: 30347
Quote:
Originally Posted by Aredhel View Post
Say hello to the Acorn Woodpecker!

Thanks for the post...good pic
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
 
Old 03-07-2018, 03:28 PM
 
Location: Grosse Ile Michigan
27,759 posts, read 65,567,547 times
Reputation: 32923
No they also peck at houses. B tards
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
 
Old 03-07-2018, 06:13 PM
 
875 posts, read 1,266,928 times
Reputation: 1745
Quote:
Originally Posted by fisheye View Post
The tree they were on was very short. It caught out attention because to the wood flying off the tree and then we counted woodpeckers. Before that we have witnessed two on one tree; but never a group like that one. I have no idea if it was a family picnic or tribal powwow? Perhaps they just found something tasty and the word got out? I would be interested in hearing if anybody else has ever seen a group of the large Pileateds like that?

Pileated woodpeckers seem to have made a recovery in my area. I don't ever remember seeing as many growing up. I just hope they never take up house pecking!
It's interesting that you saw so many in one area, my guess would be that they were making a recovery because there is a larger number of dead standing trees in your area (although as another poster mentioned, they are one of the few woodpeckers that will excavate in a live tree, I've never witnessed it but another birder whom I know well has seen it happen). What month did you observe this? Did you notice if any of them were juveniles?

Dead standing trees are good for woodpecker populations, and with the serious decline in the beaver population in the late 1800's the number of dead standing trees (that would occur in flooded areas) declined as well, which meant that some woodpeckers and other cavity-nesting birds took a hit.

Woodpeckers are primary cavity nesters, which means that they will excavate the original hole for the nest. Titmice, nuthatches, wood ducks, screech owls, and tree swallows are some examples of secondary cavity nesters, which means that they will only occupy holes that have already been excavated (chickadees are sometimes regarded as secondary although they will sometimes excavate). There are probably more dead standing trees in your area and lots of contiguous forest, meaning that they can find plenty of resources within a smaller territory.

Regarding the family picnic, what you very likely saw was them farming for carpenter ants in the rotting wood. They do that regularly. Sometimes you will see huge, oblong holes in dead trees with lots of sawdust on the ground, that is a telltale sign that a pileated woodpecker has found carpenter ants and continued to dig into the rotting wood for them.
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
Please register to post and access all features of our very popular forum. It is free and quick. Over $68,000 in prizes has already been given out to active posters on our forum. Additional giveaways are planned.

Detailed information about all U.S. cities, counties, and zip codes on our site: City-data.com.


Reply
Please update this thread with any new information or opinions. This open thread is still read by thousands of people, so we encourage all additional points of view.

Quick Reply
Message:

Over $104,000 in prizes was already given out to active posters on our forum and additional giveaways are planned!

Go Back   City-Data Forum > General Forums > Nature
Similar Threads
Follow City-Data.com founder on our Forum or

All times are GMT -6.

© 2005-2020, Advameg, Inc. · Please obey Forum Rules · Terms of Use and Privacy Policy · Bug Bounty

City-Data.com - Archive 1, 2, 3, 4, 5, 6, 7, 8, 9, 10, 11, 12, 13, 14, 15, 16, 17, 18, 19, 20, 21, 22, 23, 24, 25, 26, 27, 28, 29, 30, 31, 32, 33, 34, 35 - Top