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Old 03-16-2018, 05:17 AM
 
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Zoisite View Post
I'd be really surprised if such a small natural catchment of water like that has a name. It's not a lake, it's a pond, just a little 1/2 acre sized pan or depression in the rocks that catches underground spring water or seasonal run off water.


rhbj03 - Lakes and ponds are two very different environments and if that pond ever did have fish in it in the past then it would likely be because the owners stocked it and fed the fish. Where is the water outlet from the pond, how wide is the outlet and what is the volume and speed of the run off from the pond? If there's no surface water outlet then there is probably no adequate circulation in the pond either. The water looks shallow and stagnant to me and that may be from lack of circulation, algae blooms and/or from mineral sediment build up. That is all acid soil and rock there, the trees visible are acidic trees, so the pond might also have been heavily limed by the owners and you should ask about that. You do need to get the water tested for all possible toxicities.

.
interesting side note: neighbor in Mississippi (Marshall Co)wanted to build up a driveway to his little barn on his wooded property. He hired a guy who used nearby dirt, creating a hole in the ground. The hole filled with rainwater and, years later there are fish! Lucky for them he's a vegetarian!

OP I hope you get it!
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Old 03-16-2018, 07:55 AM
 
Location: Cody, WY
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Quote:
Originally Posted by rhbj03 View Post
Extensive tests likely will not be viable, since the owner has shown the house twice and will likely get an offer soon. I may hold out but others may not. This is seller's market now.

Property is in El Dorado County.
I'd make an offer contingent on water tests to be paid for by the seller. Other potential buyers may not be morons either.
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Old 03-16-2018, 09:49 AM
 
Location: Southern Colorado
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Water is usually clear with the appearance of color being due to the spectrum of light that passes through. Deep water, hundreds of feet deep, will appear to be dark blue. As the ocean depths decrease due to the approaching shoreline, the "color" of the water becomes green.

Algae spores may also turn the water into a greenish solution.

Should be aquatic animals in a pond. Like fish, turtles, frogs, tadpoles, and salamanders. If not, I would be very concerned.

If this is caused by a proliferation of algae, I would look to the cause. Ash from wildfires? Phosphates from agricultural run off due to fertilizer usage?

When such algae blooms die off, the water oxygen levels plummet and the water becomes anaerobic and a mass die off follows. I believe this happens annually where the Mississippi River dumps into the Gulf of Mexico. Farming fertilizers creating the nutrients for the explosion in algae.

If the pond has normal levels of aquatic life that is a good sign. If the pond is dead, I would probably run.

Green algae is usually good. A lot of health conscious people consume spirulina...which is algae. Cyanobacteria is a slime, often reddish, and may be confused with algae. Cyanobacteria is bad and is never green in my experience or readings.
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Old 03-16-2018, 10:59 AM
 
Location: British Columbia ~🌄 ☀️ ♥ 🍁 ♥ ☀️🌄~
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Quote:
Originally Posted by hunterseat View Post
interesting side note: neighbor in Mississippi (Marshall Co)wanted to build up a driveway to his little barn on his wooded property. He hired a guy who used nearby dirt, creating a hole in the ground. The hole filled with rainwater and, years later there are fish! Lucky for them he's a vegetarian!

OP I hope you get it!

Interesting side note in response: I have heard similar stories and have no doubt they're true. In the mid 19th century when immigrant homesteaders dug out seep reservoirs on the prairies for their livestock many of those ponds ended up eventually having fish show up in them. One theory I've heard about how fish get to isolated bodies of water is that fish eggs may get transported to the ponds on or in the bodies of waterfowl who visit the ponds. Another theory I've heard is that some fish or their eggs may travel or be carried via underground spring systems that feed into the ponds.


.
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Old 03-16-2018, 12:32 PM
 
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Some mountain lakes are that color because of rock flour from glaciers.

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Color_of_water "Some mountain lakes and streams with finely ground rock, such as glacial flour, are turquoise."
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Old 03-16-2018, 04:34 PM
 
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Z, I think the birds are the vectors.
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Old 03-16-2018, 05:17 PM
 
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Quote:
Originally Posted by ss20ts View Post
Algae. There are toxic types of algae. Blue Green Algae is toxic to humans and animals. Yes, it can kill a dog from drinking it. I'd stay far away from that water unless you know for a fact it's been tested and what the cause is.
Blue green algae is not an algae it is technically bacteria. Some of them are toxic, some are not.

For all of the people recommending an algacide, without addressing what is causing the bloom, killing of what maybe an innocuous algae could possible leave an opening for a more noxious organism to grow in its place, sort of the way over use of antibiotics gave rise to MRSA.

Test before using any algacide. If this is a natural bloom or non harmful algae just wait awhile.
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Old 03-16-2018, 05:20 PM
 
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Quote:
Originally Posted by rhbj03 View Post
I will be asking broker questions about the lake.

For now I would like to explore the worst case scenario: Suppose that green color is indeed from the algae and the toxic type. Is this treatable with some reasonable effort? Or will I be stuck with a Superfund site?

I really like the location and geographical situation with this body of water. I would like to bid for it if this problem is not prohibitive.
Maybe I should have prefaced my replies with the statement that I am a marine scientist/oceanographer and have been actively involved in water quality projects for many years. . Anyway, even if it is a potentially toxic alga you can best treat by removing the nutrient source that is feeding the lake. There is nothing from eutrophication that would make a pond a superfund site.

What are your end goals for this pond? Are you hoping to swim in it? That could effect treatment.
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Old 03-16-2018, 05:24 PM
 
16,833 posts, read 14,734,019 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by rhbj03 View Post
Extensive tests likely will not be viable, since the owner has shown the house twice and will likely get an offer soon. I may hold out but others may not. This is seller's market now.

Property is in El Dorado County.
It is likely given the spring fed nature it is like metallic salts like copper. It is a simple test and if you can get a sample of water you can call around to the local garden supply places many have a water feature specialist who can test for a small fee. If they use a colormetric test it would be isntaneous.
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Old 03-17-2018, 05:18 PM
 
Location: Mendocino, CA
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Here are more pictures of the lake/pond. Any more thoughts from these? Agent says it's just a regular lake/pond, no known issue with it; there is fish. The lake is 100+ feet deep and is rumored to be an old mining hole. I won't be able to do a water test as you know real estate market in CA can be a bit crazy; things happen fast. So I can only go by that little info plus these pictures.

Is it natural for a mountain lake to be this emerald in color?-9.jpg

Is it natural for a mountain lake to be this emerald in color?-8.jpg

Is it natural for a mountain lake to be this emerald in color?-7.jpg

Is it natural for a mountain lake to be this emerald in color?-6.jpg

Is it natural for a mountain lake to be this emerald in color?-5.jpg

Is it natural for a mountain lake to be this emerald in color?-4.jpg

Is it natural for a mountain lake to be this emerald in color?-3.jpg

Is it natural for a mountain lake to be this emerald in color?-2.jpg

Is it natural for a mountain lake to be this emerald in color?-1.jpg
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